Patrick J. Fitzgerald Investigating Bush Administration

LEAKGATE: This White House Scandal Finally Tips the Scale!
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/leakgate.htm

11/17/06 "The Charles Goyette Show"
Interview: Peter Lance.... Author: 9/11 Cover Up, New: Triple Cross
Patrick Fitzgerald is a doublecrosser.....etc. WOW!

Audio: http://www.apfn.net/pogo/A002I061127-goyette2.MP3

Special prosecutor, Patrick J. Fitzgerald, is investigating the outing CIA agent Valerie Plame Wilson. Suspicions have been solidly cast upon Karl Rove and Scooter Libby. There is no doubt that the crime wasn't committed alone or without the help of others.

Fitzgerald Launches Web Site
http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/index.html 
Article: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2005/04/11/LI2005041100879.html

Patrick J, Fitzgerald - Press Release 10/28/05
http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/documents/libby_pr_28102005.pdf 
Mirrored: http://www.apfn.org/pdf/5.102805Fitzpressrelease.pdf 

October 28, 2005 Indictment: US v Libby
http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/documents/libby_indictment_28102005.pdf

In Re: Special Counsel Investigation
http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/legal_proceedings.html

Office of Special Counsel
Legal Proceedings

http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/legal_proceedings.html

Take a look at this August 8th video clip from PBS NewsHour for more background on Patrick Fitzgerald. (Windows Media format)

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Patrick J. Fitzgerald (born 1961) is the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois. On December 31, 2003, he made national headlines by being appointed to continue the investigation into the Valerie Plame CIA leak, a case sometimes referred to by the media as "Leakgate".[1] Fitzgerald was named to this role after Attorney General John Ashcroft recused himself from the case.[2]

Fitzgerald attended Amherst College and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1985. After practicing civil law, he became an Assistant United States Attorney in New York in 1988. He handled drug-trafficking cases and in 1993 helped prosecute John Gambino of the Gambino mafia family. In 1994, he became the prosecutor in the case against Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman and 11 other individuals charged in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.[3]

In 1996, Fitzgerald became the National Security Coordinator for the Office of the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York. There, he served on a team of prosecutors investigating Osama bin Laden.[4] He served as chief counsel in prosecutions related to the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa.[5]

Patrick Fitzgerald was nominated for his position as U.S. Attorney on September 19, 2001 on the recommendation of U.S. Senator Peter Fitzgerald (R-IL), and confirmed on October 24, 2001. Peter Fitzgerald and Patrick Fitzgerald are not related.[6]  http://patrick-fitzgerald.biography.ms/


Patrick J. Fitzgerald

Patrick J. Fitzgerald began serving as the United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois on September 1, 2001. Mr. Fitzgerald was initially appointed on an interim basis by Attorney General John Ashcroft before being nominated by President George W. Bush. The United States Senate confirmed his nomination by unanimous consent on October 23, 2001, and President Bush signed his commission on October 29, 2001.

Mr. Fitzgerald served on the Attorney General's Advisory Committee from 2001-2005, and he remains Chair of that Committee's sub-committee on terrorism. He is also a member of the President's Corporate Fraud Task Force. In December 2003, he was named Special Counsel to investigate the alleged disclosure of the identity of a purported employee of the Central Intelligence Agency.

As U.S. Attorney, Mr. Fitzgerald serves as the district's top federal law enforcement official. He manages of staff of approximately 300 employees, including approximately 150 Assistant U.S. Attorneys, who handle civil litigation and criminal investigations and prosecutions involving public corruption, narcotics trafficking, violent crime and white-collar fraud. The Northern District of Illinois covers 18 northern Illinois counties across the top tier of the state, with a population of approximately nine million people. The USAO has a branch office in Rockford staffed by seven attorneys.

During the last three years, Mr. Fitzgerald has provided leadership and played a personal role in many significant investigations involving terrorism financing, public corruption, corporate fraud, and violent crime, including narcotics and gang prosecutions.

In Chicago, Mr. Fitzgerald has supervised the continuing public corruption investigation known as Operation Safe Road, which began in 1998, and which resulted in the convictions of more than 65 defendants, including more than 30 public employees and officials. In 2004, he has overseen the beginning of an investigation of the City of Chicago's Hired Truck Program. Mr. Fitzgerald has also committed himself personally to the implementation of Project Safe Neighborhoods as part of a concerted effort with the Chicago Police Department and other state and federal law enforcement agencies to reduce gun violence.

Mr. Fitzgerald also served as trial counsel in United States v. Arnaout, in which the executive director of Benevolence International Foundation, Inc., a charitable organization based in south suburban Chicago, was sentenced to 11 years in prison after pleading guilty to racketeering conspiracy for fraudulently obtaining charitable donations to provide financial assistance to persons engaged in violent activities overseas, including to fighters in Chechnya and Bosnia, instead of using donations strictly for peaceful, humanitarian purposes.

Previously, Mr. Fitzgerald served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney in the United States Attorney's Office for the Southern District of New York for 13 years. He served as Chief of the Organized Crime-Terrorism Unit since December 1995, in addition to holding other supervisory positions during his tenure in that office.

In New York, Mr. Fitzgerald participated in the prosecution of United States v. Usama Bin Laden, et al., in which 23 defendants were charged with various offenses, including conspiracy to murder United States nationals overseas and the August 1998 bombings of the United States embassies in Nairobi, Kenya, and Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Four defendants went on trial in January 2001 in New York, and a jury returned guilty verdicts against all four on May 29, 2001. All four were sentenced to life in prison on Oct. 18, 2001.

Mr. Fitzgerald also participated in the trial of United States v. Omar Abdel Rahman, et al., a nine-month trial in 1995 of 12 defendants who participated in a seditious conspiracy that involved the February 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center and a spring 1993 plot to bomb the United Nations, the FBI building in New York, and the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, as well as a conspiracy to assassinate President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt. He also supervised the case of United States v. Ramzi Yousef, et al., the 1996 prosecution of three defendants who participated in a conspiracy in the Philippines in late 1994 and early 1995 to detonate bombs simultaneously on 12 American airliners. In 1993, Mr. Fitzgerald participated in the six-month trial of United States v. John Gambino, et al., the prosecution of a Gambino crime family capo and his crew for narcotics trafficking, murder, racketeering, jury tampering and other charges.

Among Mr. Fitzgerald's awards and honors are the Attorney General's Award for Exceptional Service in 1996, the Stimson Medal from the Association of the Bar of the City of New York in 1997 and the Attorney General's Award for Distinguished Service in 2002.

Mr. Fitzgerald, 44, is a native of Brooklyn, N.Y. He joined the U.S. Attorney's Office in Manhattan in 1988 after three years as a litigation associate at the New York law firm, Christy & Viener. He graduated from Amherst College, Phi Beta Kappa, with a bachelor's degree in economics and mathematics in 1982, and from Harvard Law School in 1985. http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/aboutus/patrickjfizgerald.html


A Warning to Traitors: Fitzgerald pursues 'man at the top'

U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald has prosecuted mobsters, terrorists and even journalists. He has investigated and charged state and city officials in this notoriously crooked state with pit bull tenacity.

And always, he has methodically, inexorably pursued his investigations to target the man at the top of the organizational pyramid.
...
The 6-foot, 2-inch, 215-pound former rugby player is considered one of the most aggressive and uncompromising prosecutors in the country.
...
He won the high-profile job in Chicago when Illinois' maverick senator, Peter Fitzgerald, (no relation) recommended him to the White House as someone who would be "untouchable" -- a modern-day Elliot Ness -- by the political power brokers in the state.
...
People who have watched Mr. Fitzgerald operate in Chicago, and before that as assistant U.S. Attorney in New York City, are not surprised by his zeal in pursuing the journalists. But don't expect him to stop there.

That's how he operates: Apply maximum pressure to reluctant witnesses in order to build an air-tight case against the most senior member of a criminal conspiracy.
...
Cindy Canary, executive director of the Illinois Campaign for Political Reform, said Mr. Fitzgerald has "stepped up the pace of prosecutions tremendously" since taking the job in September, 2001.

"You get the sense that there are absolutely no sacred cows with him. He aims straight for the top." http://www.bradblog.com/archives/00001743.htm


Fitzgerald Launches Web Site
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2005/04/11/LI2005041100879.html

By Dan Froomkin
Special to washingtonpost.com
Friday, October 21, 2005; 1:00 PM

Special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald has just launched his own brand-new Web site.

 SEE http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/iln/osc/index.html

Could it be that he's getting ready to release some new legal documents? Like, maybe, some indictments? It's certainly not the action of an office about to fold up its tents and go home.

Fitzgerald spokesman Randall Samborn minimized the significance of the Web launch in an interview this morning.

"I would strongly caution, Dan, against reading anything into it substantive, one way or the other," he said. "It's really a long overdue effort to get something on the Internet to answer a lot of questions that we get . . . and to put up some of the documents that we have had ongoing and continued interest in having the public be able to access."

OK, OK. But will the Web site be used for future documents as well?

"The possibility exists," Samborn said.

Among the documents currently available on the site:

* The December 30, 2003, memo, memo from then-acting attorney general James B. Comey establishing Fitzgerald as an independent special counsel with "all the authority of the Attorney General with respect to the Department's investigation into the alleged unauthorized disclosure of a CIA employee's identity."

* A Feb. 6, 2004, follow-up, follow-up confirming that his mandate "includes the authority to investigate and prosecute violations of any federal laws related to the underlying alleged unauthorized disclosure, as well as federal crimes committed in the course of, and with intent to interfere with, your investigation."

The Web site is "bare bones" and is "still a work in progress," Samborn said. "We have some document formatting issues that we're still resolving." As a result, the site has not yet been officially announced -- although there is a link from Fitzgerald's home page as the US Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois.

Up until now, the only official repository for documents related to the special counsel's investigation had been a page  on the U.S. District Court's Web site. But it only included court motions and rulings.

Incidentally, if you call the number the new Web site lists for Fitzgerald's D.C. office, the phone is somewhat mysteriously answered "counterespionage section."

But as Samborn explained to me, that's because the special prosecutor is borrowing space in the Justice Department's Bond Building from the counterespionage section. "The office of special counsel doesn't really have its own dedicated space," he said. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/linkset/2005/04/11/LI2005041100879.html


UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. I LEWIS LIBBY: 10-28-05
http://news.findlaw.com/hdocs/docs/plame/usvlibby102805ind.pdf

Cheney, Libby Blocked Papers to Senate Intelligence Panel
http://www.truthout.org/docs_2005/102805I.shtml
Vice President Cheney and his chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, decided to
withhold crucial documents from the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2004 when the
panel was investigating the use of pre-war intelligence that erroneously concluded
Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction

Full Text: U.S. v. Libby Indictment

Office of Special Counsel
Friday, October 28, 2005; 1:49 PM

Following is the full text of the indictment of Vice President Cheney's chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, after a two-year investigation into the leak of a CIA agent's identity:

IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

Holding a Criminal Term

Grand Jury Sworn in on October 31, 2003

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA v. I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY"

Criminal No.

GRAND JURY ORIGINAL

Count 1: Obstruction of Justice (18 U.S.C. Section 1503)

Counts 2-3: False Statements (18 U.S.C. Section 1001(a)(2))

Counts 4-5: Perjury (18 U.S.C. Section 1623)

INDICTMENT

COUNT ONE (Obstruction of Justice)

THE GRAND JURY CHARGES:

1. At times material to this indictment:

Defendant's Employment and Responsibilities

a. Beginning on or about January 20, 2001, and continuing through the date of

this indictment, defendant I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY," was employed

as Assistant to the President of the United States, Chief of Staff to the Vice President of the United States, and Assistant to the Vice President for National Security Affairs. In the course of his work, LIBBY had frequent access to classified information and frequently spoke with officials of the U.S. intelligence community, as well as other government officials, regarding sensitive national security matters.

b. In connection with his role as a senior government official with responsibilities for national security matters, LIBBY held security clearances entitling him to access to classified information. As a person with such clearances, LIBBY was obligated by applicable laws and regulations, including Title 18, United States Code, Section 793, and Executive Order 12958 (as modified by Executive Order 13292), not to disclose classified information to persons not authorized to receive such information, and otherwise to exercise proper care to safeguard classified information against unauthorized disclosure. On or about January 23, 2001, LIBBY executed a written "Classified Information Nondisclosure Agreement," stating in part that "I understand and

accept that by being granted access to classified information, special confidence and trust shall be placed in me by the United States Government," and that "I have been advised that the unauthorized disclosure, unauthorized retention, or negligent handling of classified information by me could cause damage or irreparable injury to the United States or could be used to advantage by a foreign nation."

The Central Intelligence Agency

c. The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was an agency of the United States whose mission was to collect, produce, and disseminate intelligence and counterintelligence information to officers and departments of the United States government, including the President, the National Security Council, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

d. The responsibilities of certain CIA employees required that their association with the CIA be kept secret; as a result, the fact that these individuals were employed by the CIA was classified. Disclosure of the fact that such individuals were employed by the CIA had the potential to damage the national security in ways that ranged from preventing the future use of those individuals in a covert capacity, to compromising intelligence-gathering methods and operations, and endangering the safety of CIA employees and those who dealt with them.

Joseph Wilson and Valerie Plame Wilson

e. Joseph Wilson ("Wilson") was a former career State Department official who had held a variety of posts, including United States Ambassador. In 2002, after an inquiry to the CIA by the Vice President concerning certain intelligence reporting, the CIA decided on its own initiative to send Wilson to the country of Niger to investigate allegations involving Iraqi efforts to acquire uranium yellowcake, a processed form of uranium ore. Wilson orally reported his findings to the CIA upon his return.

f. Joseph Wilson was married to Valerie Plame Wilson ("Valerie Wilson"). At all relevant times from January 1, 2002 through July 2003, Valerie Wilson was employed by the CIA, and her employment status was classified. Prior to July 14, 2003, Valerie Wilson's affiliation with the CIA was not common knowledge outside the intelligence community.

Events Leading up to July 2003

2. On or about January 28, 2003, President George W. Bush delivered his State of the Union address which included sixteen words asserting that "The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa."

3. On May 6, 2003, the New York Times published a column by Nicholas Kristof which disputed the accuracy of the "sixteen words" in the State of the Union address. The column reported that, following a request from the Vice President's office for an investigation of allegations that Iraq sought to buy uranium from Niger, an unnamed former ambassador was sent on a trip to Niger in 2002 to investigate the allegations. According to the column, the ambassador reported back to the CIA and State Department in early 2002 that the allegations were unequivocally wrong and based on forged documents.

4. On or about May 29, 2003, in the White House, LIBBY asked an Under Secretary of State ("Under Secretary") for information concerning the unnamed ambassador's travel to Niger to investigate claims about Iraqi efforts to acquire uranium yellowcake. The Under Secretary thereafter directed the State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research to prepare a report concerning the ambassador and his trip. The Under Secretary provided LIBBY with interim oral reports in late May and early June 2003, and advised LIBBY that Wilson was the former ambassador who took the trip.

5. On or about June 9, 2003, a number of classified documents from the CIA were faxed to the Office of the Vice President to the personal attention of LIBBY and another person in the Office of the Vice President. The faxed documents, which were marked as classified, discussed, among other things, Wilson and his trip to Niger, but did not mention Wilson by name. After receiving these documents, LIBBY and one or more other persons in the Office of the Vice President handwrote the names "Wilson" and "Joe Wilson" on the documents.

6. On or about June 11 or 12, 2003, the Under Secretary of State orally advised LIBBY in the White House that, in sum and substance, Wilson's wife worked at the CIA and that State Department personnel were saying that Wilson's wife was involved in the planning of his trip.

7. On or about June 11, 2003, LIBBY spoke with a senior officer of the CIA to ask about the origin and circumstances of Wilson's trip, and was advised by the CIA officer that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA and was believed to be responsible for sending Wilson on the trip.

8. Prior to June 12, 2003, Washington Post reporter Walter Pincus contacted the Office of the Vice President in connection with a story he was writing about Wilson's trip. LIBBY participated in discussions in the Office of the Vice President concerning how to respond to Pincus.

9. On or about June 12, 2003, LIBBY was advised by the Vice President of the United States that Wilson's wife worked at the Central Intelligence Agency in the Counterproliferation Division. LIBBY understood that the Vice President had learned this information from the CIA.

10. On June 12, 2003, the Washington Post published an article by reporter Walter Pincus about Wilson's trip to Niger, which described Wilson as a retired ambassador but not by name, and reported that the CIA had sent him to Niger after an aide to the Vice President raised questions about purported Iraqi efforts to acquire uranium. Pincus's article questioned the accuracy of the "sixteen words," and stated that the retired ambassador had reported to the CIA that the uranium purchase story was false.

11. On or about June 14, 2003, LIBBY met with a CIA briefer. During their conversation he expressed displeasure that CIA officials were making comments to reporters critical of the Vice President's office, and discussed with the briefer, among other things, "Joe Wilson" and his wife "Valerie Wilson," in the context of Wilson's trip to Niger.

12. On or about June 19, 2003, an article appeared in The New Republic magazine online entitled "The First Casualty: The Selling of the Iraq War." Among other things, the article questioned the "sixteen words" and stated that following a request for information from the Vice President, the CIA had asked an unnamed ambassador to travel to Niger to investigate allegations that Iraq had sought uranium from Niger. The article included a quotation attributed to the unnamed ambassador alleging that administration officials "knew the Niger story was a flat-out lie." The article also was critical of how the administration, including the Office of the Vice President, portrayed intelligence concerning Iraqi capabilities with regard to weapons of mass destruction, and accused the administration of suppressing dissent from the intelligence agencies on this topic.

13. Shortly after publication of the article in The New Republic, LIBBY spoke by telephone with his then Principal Deputy and discussed the article. That official asked LIBBY whether information about Wilson's trip could be shared with the press to rebut the allegations that the Vice President had sent Wilson. LIBBY responded that there would be complications at the CIA in disclosing that information publicly, and that he could not discuss the matter on a non-secure telephone line.

14. On or about June 23, 2003, LIBBY met with New York Times reporter Judith Miller. During this meeting LIBBY was critical of the CIA, and disparaged what he termed "selective leaking" by the CIA concerning intelligence matters. In discussing the CIA's handling of Wilson's trip to Niger, LIBBY informed her that Wilson's wife might work at a bureau of the CIA.

The July 6 "Op Ed" Article by Wilson

15. On July 6, 2003, the New York Times published an Op-Ed article by Wilson entitled "What I Didn't Find in Africa." Also on July 6, 2003, the Washington Post published an article about Wilson's 2002 trip to Niger, which article was based in part upon an interview of Wilson. Also on July 6, Wilson appeared as a guest on the television interview show "Meet the Press." In his Op-Ed article and interviews in print and on television, Wilson asserted, among other things, that he had taken a trip to Niger at the request of the CIA in February 2002 to investigate allegations that Iraq had sought or obtained uranium yellowcake from Niger, and that he doubted Iraq had obtained uranium from Niger recently, for a number of reasons. Wilson stated that he believed, based on his understanding of government procedures, that the Office of the Vice President was advised of the results of his trip.

LIBBY's Actions Following Wilson's July 6 "Op Ed" Column

16. On or about July 7, 2003, LIBBY had lunch with the then White House Press Secretary and advised the Press Secretary that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA and noted that such information was not widely known.

17. On or about the morning of July 8, 2003, LIBBY met with New York Times reporter Judith Miller. When the conversation turned to the subject of Joseph Wilson, LIBBY asked that the information LIBBY provided on the topic of Wilson be attributed to a "former Hill staffer" rather than to a "senior administration official," as had been the understanding with respect to other information that LIBBY provided to Miller during this meeting. LIBBY thereafter discussed with Miller Wilson's trip and criticized the CIA reporting concerning Wilson's trip. During this discussion, LIBBY advised Miller of his belief that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA.

18. Also on or about July 8, 2003, LIBBY met with the Counsel to the Vice President in an anteroom outside the Vice President's Office. During their brief conversation, LIBBY asked the Counsel to the Vice President, in sum and substance, what paperwork there would be at the CIA if an employee's spouse undertook an overseas trip.

19. Not earlier than June 2003, but on or before July 8, 2003, the Assistant to the Vice President for Public Affairs learned from another government official that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA, and advised LIBBY of this information.

20. On or about July 10, 2003, LIBBY spoke to NBC Washington Bureau Chief Tim Russert to complain about press coverage of LIBBY by an MSNBC reporter. LIBBY did not discuss Wilson's wife with Russert.

21. On or about July 10 or July 11, 2003, LIBBY spoke to a senior official in the White House ("Official A") who advised LIBBY of a conversation Official A had earlier that week with columnist Robert Novak in which Wilson's wife was discussed as a CIA employee involved in Wilson's trip. LIBBY was advised by Official A that Novak would be writing a story about Wilson's wife.

22. On or about July 12, 2003, LIBBY flew with the Vice President and others to and from Norfolk, Virginia, on Air Force Two. On his return trip, LIBBY discussed with other officials aboard the plane what LIBBY should say in response to certain pending media inquiries, including questions from Time reporter Matthew Cooper.

23. On or about July 12, 2003, in the afternoon, LIBBY spoke by telephone to Cooper, who asked whether LIBBY had heard that Wilson's wife was involved in sending Wilson on the trip to Niger. LIBBY confirmed to Cooper, without elaboration or qualification, that he had heard this information too.

24. On or about July 12, 2003, in the late afternoon, LIBBY spoke by telephone with Judith Miller of the New York Times and discussed Wilson's wife, and that she worked at the CIA.

The Criminal Investigation

25. On or about September 26, 2003, the Department of Justice authorized the Federal Bureau of Investigation ("FBI") to commence a criminal investigation into the possible unauthorized disclosure of classified information regarding the disclosure of Valerie Wilson's affiliation with the CIA to various reporters in the spring of 2003.

26. As part of the criminal investigation, LIBBY was interviewed by Special Agents of the FBI on or about October 14 and November 26, 2003, each time in the presence of his counsel. During these interviews, LIBBY stated to FBI Special Agents that:

a. During a conversation with Tim Russert of NBC News on July 10 or 11, 2003, Russert asked LIBBY if LIBBY was aware that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA. LIBBY responded to Russert that he did not know that, and Russert replied that all the reporters knew it. LIBBY was surprised by this statement because, while speaking with Russert, LIBBY did not recall that he previously had learned about Wilson's wife's employment from the Vice President.

b. During a conversation with Matthew Cooper of Time magazine on or about July 12, 2003, LIBBY told Cooper that reporters were telling the administration that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, but that LIBBY did not know if this was true; and

c. LIBBY did not discuss Wilson's wife with New York Times reporter Judith Miller during a meeting with Miller on or about July 8, 2003.

27. Beginning in or about January 2004, and continuing until the date of this indictment, Grand Jury 03-3 sitting in the District of Columbia conducted an investigation ("the Grand Jury Investigation") into possible violations of federal criminal laws, including: Title 50, United States Code, Section 421 (disclosure of the identity of covert intelligence personnel); and Title 18, United States Code, Sections 793 (improper disclosure of national defense information), 1001 (false statements), 1503 (obstruction of justice), and 1623 (perjury).

28. A major focus of the Grand Jury Investigation was to determine which government officials had disclosed to the media prior to July 14, 2003 information concerning the affiliation of Valerie Wilson with the CIA, and the nature, timing, extent, and purpose of such disclosures, as well as whether any official making such a disclosure did so knowing that the employment of Valerie Wilson by the CIA was classified information.

29. During the course of the Grand Jury Investigation, the following matters, among others, were material to the Grand Jury Investigation:

i. When, and the manner and means by which, defendant LIBBY learned that Wilson's wife was employed by the CIA;

ii. Whether and when LIBBY disclosed to members of the media that Wilson's wife was employed by the CIA;

iii. The language used by LIBBY in disclosing any such information to the media, including whether LIBBY expressed uncertainty about the accuracy of any information he may have disclosed, or described where he obtained the information;

iv. LIBBY's knowledge as to whether any information he disclosed was classified at the time he disclosed it; and

v. Whether LIBBY was candid with Special Agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation in describing his conversations with the other government officials and the media relating to Valerie Wilson.

LIBBY's Grand Jury Testimony

30. On or about March 5 and March 24, 2004, LIBBY testified before Grand Jury 03-3.

On each occasion of LIBBY's testimony, the foreperson of the Grand Jury administered the oath to LIBBY and LIBBY swore to tell the truth in the testimony he was about to give.

31. In or about March 2004, in the District of Columbia,

I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY,"

defendant herein, did knowingly and corruptly endeavor to influence, obstruct and impede the due administration of justice, namely proceedings before Grand Jury 03-3, by misleading and deceiving the grand jury as to when, and the manner and means by which, LIBBY acquired and subsequently disclosed to the media information concerning the employment of Valerie Wilson by the CIA.

32. It was part of the corrupt endeavor that during his grand jury testimony, defendant LIBBY made the following materially false and intentionally misleading statements and

representations, in substance, under oath:

a. When LIBBY spoke with Tim Russert of NBC News, on or about July 10, 2003:

i. Russert asked LIBBY if LIBBY knew that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, and told LIBBY that all the reporters knew it; and

ii. At the time of this conversation, LIBBY was surprised to hear that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA;

b. LIBBY advised Matthew Cooper of Time magazine on or about July 12, 2003, that he had heard that other reporters were saying that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, and further advised him that LIBBY did not know whether this assertion was true; and

c. LIBBY advised Judith Miller of the New York Times on or about July 12, 2003 that he had heard that other reporters were saying that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA but LIBBY did not know whether that assertion was true.

33. It was further part of the corrupt endeavor that at the time defendant LIBBY made each of the above-described materially false and intentionally misleading statements and representations to the grand jury, LIBBY was aware that they were false, in that:

a. When LIBBY spoke with Tim Russert of NBC News on or about July 10, 2003:

i. Russert did not ask LIBBY if LIBBY knew that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did he tell LIBBY that all the reporters knew it; and

ii. At the time of this conversation, LIBBY was well aware that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA; in fact, LIBBY had participated in multiple prior conversations concerning this topic, including on the following occasions:

In or about early June 2003, LIBBY learned from the Vice President that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA in the Counterproliferation Division;

 

Cheney, Libby Blocked Papers to Senate Intelligence Panel
http://www.truthout.org/docs_2005/102805I.shtml
Vice President Cheney and his chief of staff, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, decided to withhold crucial documents from the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2004 when the panel was investigating the use of pre-war intelligence that erroneously concluded Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.
  • On or about June 11, 2003, LIBBY was informed by a senior CIA officer that Wilson's wife was employed by the CIA and that the idea of sending him to Niger originated with her;

  • On or about June 12, 2003, LIBBY was informed by the Under Secretary of State that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA;

  • On or about June 14, 2003, LIBBY discussed "Joe Wilson" and "Valerie Wilson" with his CIA briefer, in the context of Wilson's trip to Niger;

  • On or about June 23, 2003, LIBBY informed reporter Judith Miller that Wilson's wife might work at a bureau of the CIA;

  • On or about July 7, 2003, LIBBY advised the White House Press Secretary that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA;

  • In or about June or July 2003, and in no case later than on or about July 8, 2003, LIBBY was advised by the Assistant to the Vice President for Public Affairs that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA;

  • On or about July 8, 2003, LIBBY advised reporter Judith Miller of his belief that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA; and

  • On or about July 8, 2003, LIBBY had a discussion with the Counsel to the Office of the Vice President concerning the paperwork that would exist if a person who was sent on an overseas trip by the CIA had a spouse who worked at the CIA;

    b. LIBBY did not advise Matthew Cooper, on or about July 12, 2003, that LIBBY had heard other reporters were saying that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did LIBBY advise him that LIBBY did not know whether this assertion was true; rather, LIBBY confirmed to Cooper, without qualification, that LIBBY had heard that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA; and

    c. LIBBY did not advise Judith Miller, on or about July 12, 2003, that LIBBY had heard other reporters were saying that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did LIBBY advise her that LIBBY did not know whether this assertion was true;

    In violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1503.

    COUNT TWO

    (False Statement)

    THE GRAND JURY FURTHER CHARGES:

    1. The Grand Jury realleges Paragraphs 1-26 of Count One as though fully set forth herein.

    2. During the course of the criminal investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Department of Justice, the following matters, among others, were material to that investigation:

    a. When, and the manner and means by which, defendant LIBBY learned that Wilson's wife was employed by the CIA; b. Whether and when LIBBY disclosed to members of the media that Wilson's wife was employed by the CIA;

    c. The language used by LIBBY in disclosing any such information to the media, including whether LIBBY expressed uncertainty about the accuracy of any information he may have disclosed, or described where he obtained the information; and

    d. LIBBY's knowledge as to whether any information he disclosed was classified at the time he disclosed it.

    3. On or about October 14 and November 26, 2003, in the District of Columbia,

    I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY,"

    defendant herein, did knowingly and willfully make a materially false, fictitious, and fraudulent statement and representation in a matter within the jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, an agency within the executive branch of the United States, in that the defendant, in response to questions posed to him by agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, stated that:

    During a conversation with Tim Russert of NBC News on July 10 or 11, 2003, Russert asked LIBBY if LIBBY was aware that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA.

    LIBBY responded to Russert that he did not know that, and Russert replied that all the reporters knew it. LIBBY was surprised by this statement because, while speaking with Russert, LIBBY did not recall that he previously had learned about Wilson's wife's employment from the Vice President.

    4. As defendant LIBBY well knew when he made it, this statement was false in that when LIBBY spoke with Russert on or about July 10 or 11, 2003:

    a. Russert did not ask LIBBY if LIBBY knew that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did he tell LIBBY that all the reporters knew it; and

    b. At the time of this conversation, LIBBY was well aware that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA; In violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1001(a)(2).

    COUNT THREE

    (False Statement)

    THE GRAND JURY FURTHER CHARGES:

    1. The Grand Jury realleges Paragraphs 1 and 2 of Count Two as though fully set forth herein.

    2. On or about October 14 and November 26, 2003, in the District of Columbia,

    I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY,"

    defendant herein, did knowingly and willfully make a materially false, fictitious, and fraudulent statement and representation in a matter within the jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, an agency within the executive branch of the United States, in that the defendant, in response to questions posed to him by agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, stated that:

    During a conversation with Matthew Cooper of Time magazine on July 12, 2003, LIBBY told Cooper that reporters were telling the administration that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, but LIBBY did not know if this was true.

    3. As defendant LIBBY well knew when he made it, this statement was false in that:

    LIBBY did not advise Cooper on or about July 12, 2003 that reporters were telling the administration that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did LIBBY advise him that LIBBY did not know whether this was true; rather, LIBBY confirmed for Cooper, without qualification, that LIBBY had heard that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA;

    In violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1001(a)(2).

    COUNT FOUR

    (Perjury)

    THE GRAND JURY FURTHER CHARGES:

    1. The Grand Jury realleges Paragraphs 1-30 of Count One as though fully set forth herein.

    2. On or about March 5, 2004, in the District of Columbia,

    I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY,"

    defendant herein, having taken an oath to testify truthfully in a proceeding before a grand jury of the United States, knowingly made a false material declaration, in that he gave the following testimony regarding a conversation that he represented he had with Tim Russert of NBC News, on or about July 10, 2003 (underlined portions alleged as false):

    . . . . And then he said, you know, did you know that this -- excuse me, did you know that Ambassador Wilson's wife works at the CIA? And I was a little taken aback by that. I remember being taken aback by it. And I said -- he may have said a little more but that was -- he said that. And I said, no, I don't know that. And I said, no, I don't know that intentionally because I didn't want him to take anything I was saying as in any way confirming what he said, because at that point in time I did not recall that I had ever known, and I thought this is something that he was telling me that I was first learning. And so I said, no, I don't know that because I want to be very careful not to confirm it for him, so that he didn't take my statement as confirmation for him.

    Now, I had said earlier in the conversation, which I omitted to tell you, that this -- you know, as always, Tim, our discussion is off-the-record if that's okay with you, and he said, that's fine. So then he said -- I said -- he said, sorry -- he, Mr. Russert said to me, did you know that Ambassador Wilson's wife, or his wife, works at the CIA? And I said, no, I don't know that. And then he said, yeah -- yes, all the reporters know it. And I said, again, I don't know that. I just wanted to be clear that I wasn't confirming anything for him on this. And you know, I was struck by what he was saying in that he thought it was an important fact, but I didn't ask him anymore about it because I didn't want to be digging in on him, and he then moved on and finished the conversation, something like that.

    3. In truth and fact, as LIBBY well knew when he gave this testimony, it was false in that:

    a. Russert did not ask LIBBY if LIBBY knew that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did he tell LIBBY that all the reporters knew it; and

    b. At the time of this conversation, LIBBY was well aware that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA;

    In violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1623.

    COUNT FIVE

    (Perjury)

    THE GRAND JURY FURTHER CHARGES:

    1. The Grand Jury realleges Paragraphs 1-30 of Count One as though fully set forth herein.

    2. On or about March 5, 2004 and March 24, 2004, in the District of Columbia,

    I. LEWIS LIBBY, also known as "SCOOTER LIBBY,"

    defendant herein, having taken an oath to testify truthfully in a proceeding before a grand jury of the United States, knowingly made a false material declaration, in that he gave the following testimony regarding his conversations with reporters concerning the employment of Joseph Wilson's wife by the CIA (underlined portions alleged as false):

    a. Testimony Given on or about March 5, 2004 Regarding a Conversation With Matthew Cooper on or About July 12, 2003:

    Q. And it's your specific recollection that when you told Cooper about Wilson's wife working at the CIA, you attributed that fact to what reporters --

    A. Yes.

    Q. -- plural, were saying. Correct?

    A. I was very clear to say reporters are telling us that because in my mind I still didn't know it as a fact. I thought I was -- all I had was this information that was coming in from the reporters.

    . . . .

    Q. And at the same time you have a specific recollection of telling him, you don't know whether it's true or not, you're just telling him what reporters are saying?

    A. Yes, that's correct, sir. And I said, reporters are telling us that, I don't know if it's true. I was careful about that because among other things, I wanted to be clear I didn't know Mr. Wilson. I don't know -- I think I said, I don't know if he has a wife, but this is what we're hearing.

    b. Testimony Given on or about March 24, 2004 Regarding Conversations With Reporters:

    Q. And let me ask you this directly. Did the fact that you knew that the law could turn, the law as to whether a crime was committed, could turn on where you learned the information from, affect your account for the FBI when you told them that you were telling reporters Wilson's wife worked at the CIA but your source was a reporter rather than the Vice-President?

    A. No, it's a fact. It was a fact, that's what I told the reporters.

    Q. And you're, you're certain as you sit here today that every reporter you told that Wilson's wife worked at the CIA, you sourced it back to other reporters?

    A. Yes, sir, because it was important for what I was saying and because it was -- that's what -- that's how I did it.

    . . . .

    Q. The next set of questions from the Grand Jury are -- concern this fact. If you did not understand the information about Wilson's wife to have been classified and didn't understand it when you heard it from Mr. Russert, why was it that you were so deliberate to make sure that you told other reporters that reporters were saying it and not assert it as something you knew?

    A. I want -- I didn't want to -- I didn't know if it was true and I didn't want people -- I didn't want the reporters to think it was true because I said it. I -- all I had was that reporters are telling us that, and by that I wanted them to understand it wasn't coming from me and that it might not be true. Reporters write things that aren't true sometimes, or get things that aren't true. So I wanted to be clear they didn't, they didn't think it was me saying it. I didn't know it was true and I wanted them to understand that. Also, it was important to me to let them know that because what I was telling them was that I don't know Mr. Wilson. We didn't ask for his mission. That I didn't see his report. Basically, we didn't know anything about him until this stuff came out in June. And among the other things, I didn't know he had a wife. That was one of the things I said to Mr. Cooper. I don't know if he's married. And so I wanted to be very clear about all this stuff that I didn't, I didn't know about him. And the only thing I had, I thought at the time, was what reporters are telling us.

    . . . .

    Well, talking to the other reporters about it, I don't see as a crime. What I said to the other reporters is what, you know -- I told a couple reporters what other reporters had told us, and I don't see that as a crime.

    3. In truth and fact, as LIBBY well knew when he gave this testimony, it was false in that LIBBY did not advise Matthew Cooper or other reporters that LIBBY had heard other reporters were saying that Wilson's wife worked for the CIA, nor did LIBBY advise Cooper or other reporters that LIBBY did not know whether this assertion was true;

    In violation of Title 18, United States Code, Section 1623.

    A TRUE BILL:

    FOREPERSON

    PATRICK J. FITZGERALD

    Special Counsel

  •  http://www.apfn.org/apfn/leakgate.htm
    10-28-05: Here is Fitzgerald.

    * Investigators are set up to gather the facts ... who, what, when, where, and why

    * Investigations have to be done in secrecy, especially if it involves national security

    * You have to have the fact before you let the information out; no charges, no leads

    * This was conducted in secrecy because it shows the integrity of the law as well as the dafeguards afforded to citizens put to trial under our countries laws

    * This was not just done to Valerie Plame, this was done to all of us

    * Obstruction of justice charges as no less than leak of information charges because this has compromised national security

    * Scooter Libby is innocent until proven guilty

    * The investigation was about gathering information for evidence that there was wrongdoing

    * I cannot give you any information or give you any names ... I can't tell you want I am working on ... I don't like this but it's the law ... and I think the law is right

    * People in the CIA need to know other government officials are not going to

    * Witnesses are not bound by the secrecy of a grand jury but everybody else working on it are --we could go to jail if we leaked any information

    * My job is to investigate if Scooter Libby can be charged

    * "I wished Ms. Miller would not have spent a minute in jail but I think it has to be done"
    There is a lot to learn from a reporter, especially as to how a crime is not committed but when you have a reporter who is a witness of the crime, you haev to do whatever it takes to get the facts [ By the way, this is the one moment he got emotional about this whole case].

    * He does not have the jurisdiction for writing a final report. He believes it should stay as a criminal investigation.

    * I am not an independent counsel and I am very comfortable with that.

    * We have to deal with false statements and obstruction of justice all the time ... our jobs in the criminal justice system is to have people tell us the truth ...

    * Might as well hand our jobs if we don't hold high ranking officials to the same standards

    http://www.culturekitchen.com/archives/003539.html


    PLAME INVESTIGATOR THREATENED WITH "CONSEQUENCES" IF HE DELIVERS INDICTMENTS

    The word inside the Beltway is that if Fitzgerald delivers indictments against senior White House officials, he will face unspecified "consequences."

    Oct. 14, 2005
    http://www.waynemadsenreport.com/

    October 14, 2005 -- To all those who have been kind with their support for this site, thanks again so much! Now, let me report to you what I discovered prowling Washington last night on the CIA Leakgate story, the "October Surprise" scandal that threatens the survival of the G.W. Bush/Cheney administration.


    Political insiders tracking this scandal are reporting that the GOP and neo-con political machines, which have also targeted Travis County, Texas, District Attorney Ronnie Earle in retaliation for his indictments of Tom DeLay and other Texas GOP operatives, are also setting their sights on CIA Leakgate special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald.

    For an example of this new strategy of attacking Fitzgerald, see this Washington Post OP-ED piece by Richard Cohen.
    The word inside the Beltway is that if Fitzgerald delivers indictments against senior White House officials, he will face unspecified "consequences."
    "It's a sign of desperation on the part of the White House and Karl Rove's machine," said one individual familiar with the case. Another informed observer pointed out that Fitzgerald "is the last guy the White House would want to threaten with retaliation."
    This morning, Rove testified for the fourth time before the grand jury investigating the CIA leak and the associated conspiracy to obstruct justice by the White House Iraq Group (WHIG). There are reports that former Secretary of State Colin Powell provided the grand jury with a mother lode of evidence on the role of the WHIG in its conspiracy against Valerie Plame Wilson, Ambassador Joseph Wilson, and the lies and forgeries used to lay the groundwork for the war against Iraq.

    Legal experts believe that with political pressure being brought to bear on his investigation, it is in Fitzgerald's interest to issue any indictments as soon as possible and not request an extension for the grand jury, which is due to adjourn on October 28 http://www.waynemadsenreport.com/

    Why Patrick Fitzgerald Gets It

    By Larry Johnson | bio
    Mr. Johnson worked with the Central Intelligence Agency (1985-1989)
    http://www.tpmcafe.com/story/2005/10/13/21472/723

    From: Politics
    Federal prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald understands very well that something beyond a crime was committed when Karl Rove, Scooter Libby, and other White House operatives spread the name of undercover CIA officer, Valerie Plame, around Washington as part of a coordinated effort to discredit her husband, Ambassador Joe Wilson. Someone needs to alert Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen that he is a nitwit and moron for trying to advance White House supplied talking points that no real crime occurred.

    Here are some of the facts that will come out when Fitzgerald ends his investigation:

    1. Valerie Plame was still a non-official cover officer in July 2003 when her identity was revealed by colostomy bag Bob Novak.

    2. Valerie Plame had traveled overseas on secret missions using that cover as required under the statute in question.

    3. Valerie Plame's exposure also almost compromised the identity of other non-official cover officers.

    4. Valerie Plame did not have the authority to send her husband on the Niger mission and in fact did not make the decision.

    Other mental midgets like Cohen, such as Victoria Toensing, continue to insist that no crime could have been committed because Valerie Plame, "worked at a desk job". Newsflash for these so-called Washington insiders who have proven they know nothing about the intelligence community--at least 40% of the people working at CIA Headquarters are working undercover. Just because they may physically go to the CIA building in McLean, Virginia everyday does not mean that their relationship with the CIA is acknowledged.

    During my four years of sitting at a desk at CIA I was undercover. My position with the CIA was not even known by my own parents. Only my wife was privy to that secret. Many of the undercover folks still working at CIA are at headquarters on a temporary basis. Some travel overseas on temporary assignments that last less than a month. Others await a semi-permanent posting for a two or three year stint overseas.

    The point that Cohen and the other White House hacks have missed is that protecting the identities of intelligence officers, whether they are working under official or non-official cover, is part of national defense. To compromise these identities is to commit an act of treason.

    Patrick Fitzgerald understands that he must prosecute within the confines of the law. However, he also understands that what was done to the wife of Ambassador Joe Wilson was more than a rough game of inside the beltway hardball. Karl Rove told Chris Matthews that "Wilson's wife is fair game". Not only was she an unfair target, but in going after her the White House political crew unwittingly exposed several intelligence assets and caused the loss of intelligence assets overseas.

    Richard Cohen is dead wrong to argue that the best thing Patrick Fitzgerald can do is leave town. To the contrary, the best thing Patrick Fitzgerald can do is a send a clear message to politicians in both parties that when it comes to political hardball intelligence assets must be kept out of the game. At the end of the day our nation's security is no game, it is a matter of life and death.


    Oct 13, 2005 -- 09:47:02 PM EST
    Why Patrick Fitzgerald Gets It | 23 comments (23
    http://www.tpmcafe.com/story/2005/10/13/21472/723


    Bush Without Rove Is Hard to Imagine

    AP / NEDRA PICKLER, Associated Press Writer Oct 12, 1:20 am show options
    Note: The author of this message requested that it not be archived. This message
    will be removed from Groups in 5 days (Oct 19, 1:20 am).

    WASHINGTON (AP) -- Karl Rove's fingerprints are all over
    everything at the White House, from politics to policy to the shape
    of President Bush's entire career in government.
    It's hard to imagine Bush without Rove, and vice versa. But
    the question of what would happen if Rove were forced to resign is
    something to contemplate, now that the grand jury is pressing the
    president's aide-de-camp in its investigation into who leaked the
    identity of a covert CIA officer.
    White House insiders speaking privately say Rove would be
    irreplaceable. While Bush has a few other close confidants in aides
    like chief of staff Andy Card and counselor Dan Bartlett, none
    combine such an intimate working knowledge of politics and policy
    with such a long trusted relationship with the president.
    The two have been working together since the 1970s, when
    Rove was helping lay the groundwork for the Bush's father to win the
    presidency and trying to get the younger Bush elected to Congress.
    George W. Bush lost, but it was his last failed campaign.
    With Rove as his political strategist, Bush won two Texas
    gubernatorial races and two terms in the White House.
    Stephen Hess, a presidential scholar and political analyst
    at the Brookings Institution, said that it might appear to many
    outsiders that Bush would have a hard time getting along without his
    trusted aide. But Bush would manage, Hess said, just as some other
    presidents in the past have under similar circumstances.
    Richard Nixon's aides H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman left
    amid the Watergate scandal. Jimmy Carter accepted the resignation of
    budget director Bert Lance amid allegations of financial
    irregularities at two banks where the adviser previously worked.
    George H.W. Bush lost chief of staff John Sununu after it surfaced
    that he was using government airplanes for personal trips. President
    Eisenhower's senior aide, Sherman Adams, left after accepting a fur
    coat and an oriental rug from a man with business before the federal
    government.
    "People said it would be very hard for Eisenhower to get
    along without Sherman Adams, but he did," said Hess, a former
    Eisenhower speechwriter. "We quickly realized that it was Eisenhower
    who was running the administration all along."
    Rove has already testified three times in the probe into
    whether an administration official deliberately leaked the identity
    of covert CIA operative Valerie Plame, whose husband is an
    administration critic. Rove has agreed to testify again, possibly
    this week, and prosecutors have told him they can no longer assure
    him he'll escape indictment.
    Knowingly revealing the identity of a covert agent is a
    federal crime.
    Special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald is trying to determine
    whether White House aides violated the law in an attempt to get back
    at Plame's husband, former career diplomat Joseph Wilson for his
    assertions that the administration intentionally exaggerated Iraq's
    nuclear capability to pump up support for an invasion.
    Rove has acknowledged that he discussed Wilson's allegations
    with reporters, but he said he was not the one who revealed Plame's
    identity. Vice President Dick Cheney's chief of staff, Lewis Libby,
    also has acknowledged talking to reporters about the Plame case.
    People familiar with Rove's testimony have told The
    Associated Press that Bush asked him in the fall of 2003 for
    assurances he was not involved in an effort to divulge Plame's
    identity and punish Wilson -- and Rove told the president he was not.
    At first, the White House denied that Rove had been
    involved. Bush promised to fire anyone on his staff responsible for
    such a leak. He later stepped back, saying just that he would remove
    aides who committed crimes.
    At a news conference last week, Bush declined to say whether
    he would remove an aide under indictment. On Tuesday, he told NBC's
    "Today" show: "I'm not going to talk about the case."
    If Rove is forced to resign, it would be a major blow to a
    presidency already reeling from low approval ratings, the war in
    Iraq, rising gas prices and the aftermath of two Gulf Coast
    hurricanes.
    Some Republicans suggest the investigation has already taken
    a toll, weakening and distracting Rove. Some even suggest the
    botched early response to Hurricane Katrina and the flash of
    indignation from the political right over the Harriet Miers Supreme
    Court nomination might have been averted had Rove been more
    hands-on.
    Frank Luntz, a pollster and analyst who often works for
    Republicans, counsels against counting Rove out based on what may
    look like ominous signs from the grand jury.
    "Rove has always been a survivor. He's brilliant at
    understanding the right thing to do at the right moment. He
    specializes in the ability to handle a crisis. What he has done for
    the president, I actually expect him now to do for himself," Luntz
    said. "He'll know what to do and what to say."
    ------
    EDITOR'S NOTE -- Nedra Pickler covers the White House for The
    Associated Press.
    http://groups.google.com/group/clari.usa.gov.politics/browse_thread/thread/f50394002ae6a71f/2e05b1c1dbe7d8b5?lnk=st&q=patrick+fitzgerald+prosecutor+removed&rnum=7&hl=en#2e05b1c1dbe7d8b5


    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Treasongate:_Beyond_Karl_Rove


    A Second Take on Scooter-gate. Itís all about treason

    http://bellaciao.org/en/article.php3?id_article=8690

    Marc Rich and then-wife Denise in a 1986 photo

    CLINTON FURTHER PAYS OFF THE ISRAELIS
    MARC RICH WAS "A MOSSAD" SPY FOR ISRAEL

    http://www.apfn.org/apfn/rich.htm

    William Jefferson Clinton
    & Hillary Clinton
    Clinton Pardon's List includes 'Marc Rich'

    http://www.apfn.org/apfn/clintons.htm


     

    Patrick Fitzgerald
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patrick_Fitzgerald

    Treasongate: Beyond Karl Rove
    http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Treasongate:_Beyond_Karl_Rove

    Patrick J. 'Bulldog' Fitzgerald, American Insurgent
    Occupied Washington under siege

    http://www.antiwar.com/justin/?articleid=6711

    The Prosecutor Never Rests
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A55560-2005Feb1_4.html

    Why Did Attorney General Ashcroft Remove Himself
    From The Valerie Plame Wilson Leak Investigation?

    http://www.dissidentvoice.org/Jan04/Dean0108.htm

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