Iraqis Tortured and Abused by US Personnel

Part 5

BCST 8/27/06
C-SPAN BOOK TV - 9/11 COMMISSION INTERVIEW
9/11 ACCOUNTABILTY Vs. "The Case For Impeachment"
AUDIO (ABOUT 55 MINUTES)
http://www.apfn.net/pogo/L002I060827-911-impeachment2.MP3

9/11 ACCOUNTABILITY....WE WHERE VERY UNJUDGEMENTAL
THE 9/11 COMMISSION....THESE GUYS ARE SHOCKING!!!!
AUDIO:
http://www.apfn.net/pogo/L001I060827-911-impeachment1.MP3

Shocking photos; Part of a wider pattern?
Paul Adams, BBC News. April 30, 2004 (RealMedia, 2:45 min video)

Iraqis Being Abused by US Personnel

Part 1 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW.htm 
Part 2 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW2.htm 
Part 3 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW3.htm 
Part 4 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW4.htm 
Part 6 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW6.htm 
Part 7 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW7.htm 
Part 8 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW8.htm
Part 9 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW9.htm 

53 Page Prison Abuse Report http://www.apfn.org/apfn/Prison_abuse_report.pdf
24 Page Red Cross Report http://www.apfn.org/pdf/Red-Cross-report.pdf

Iraqis Abused by U.S. Personnel - Military Documents
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/pow_legal_doc.htm

Intelligence Interrogation
Legal Documents and punishments
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/pow_legal_doc.htm

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PAINFUL REMINDER
of 4 days of incarceration
in March. His arrest was
a mistake. Time Magazine.

http://www.time.com/time/covers/1101040517/photoessay/index.html

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CAPTIVE: A hooded detainee sits in a car pit under the surveillance of US Marines from the1st Marine Expeditionary Force on April 7, 2004 in Fallujah, Iraq.

A Pattern of Abuse?
For two years reports have piled up about "stress and duress" techniques military and CIA officers are using on al-Qaeda and Iraqi captives

Posted Sunday, May 9, 2004
While nothing compared to the horrors of Saddam Hussein's regime, the actions of U.S. soldiers at Abu Ghraib unquestionably violated international law. What's more, for two years reports have piled up about "stress and duress" techniques military and CIA officers are using on al-Qaeda and Iraqi captives. Those tactics—torture lite—also go against international rules; their practice may have encouraged the crimes at Abu Ghraib.

The Techniques

Prisoners and human rights groups have described various coercive methods used by the U.S. on captives held overseas. U.S. officials admit to some of them.

Sleep Deprivation
Interrogators keep captives awake for days with bright lights and loud music.

Uncomfortable Positions
Prisoners are forced to stand or squat in positions for hours or are held in cramped spaces where they cannot sit, stand or lie down.

Shock Therapy
Soldiers "soften" captives before handing them over to interrogators. Prisoners are beaten, stripped, doused with water and subjected to drastic swings in temperature. They are often made to remain naked even while watched by female guards.

Sensory Deprivation
To disorient captives, interrogators place hoods, duct tape or darkened goggles over their eyes for hours at a time. Mind Games Interrogators cajole, scare or confuse prisoners. They threaten to send captives to countries with a known history of torture, like Egypt or Morocco. Occasionally the U.S. has carried out that threat.

The Law

The Third Geneva Convention forbids subjecting POWs to "cruel treatment and torture, outrages upon personal dignity and humiliating treatment." U.S. officials say Iraqi and Taliban captives are covered by the convention but al-Qaeda members are unlawful combatants and thus not covered. The convention says tribunals must decide a prisoner's status.

The Convention Against Torture defines torture as any act that inflicts severe pain or suffering, physical or mental. When the U.S. ratified the convention in 1990, it defined torture as anything cruel and unusual under the Eighth Amendment. The convention prohibits countries from handing over captives to another state known to employ torture.


The Challenges

Lawyers for Guantanamo detainees argued before the U.S. Supreme Court last month that their clients deserve access to courts to challenge their imprisonment.

The Center for Constitutional Rights filed suit against the Justice Department in January on behalf of Maher Arar, a Canadian arrested during a layover in New York City because of suspected al-Qaeda ties. He was deported to Syria, where the C.C.R. alleges he was tortured for months before winning release.

Justice Department and Pentagon Investigators are examining multiple prisoner deaths in Afghanistan and Iraq. Three of those captives died while under interrogation by the CIA.

http://www.time.com/time/covers/1101040517/wgraphics.html

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Delta Force,
Navy SEALs involved in abuse?
Iraqi died while being interrogated at prison

By Andrea Mitchell
Correspondent
NBC News
Updated: 6:15 p.m. ET May 06, 2004As the investigation expands, officials tell NBC News that special operations forces, including both Delta Force and Navy SEALs, were possibly also involved in abusing prisoners in Iraq.

In fact, one prisoner, Mon Adel al Jamadi, died while being interrogated in Abu Ghraib by a CIA officer last November, shortly after being captured by Navy SEALs. Al Jamadi was being questioned about a plot to attack U.S. forces with plastic explosives.

An autopsy revealed al Jamadi had broken ribs and had been “badly beaten.” His CIA interrogator has told investigators the prisoner was injured before he was turned over to the CIA — something the Navy denies.

In a second case, the CIA is being investigated for the death of Iraqi Gen. Abed Hamed Mowhoush near the Syrian border, also last November. The CIA says he died several days after they questioned him.

A third CIA prisoner died last June in Afghanistan — also after a severe beating.

Did the CIA or other intelligence agencies tell the guards to get the prisoners to talk? According to former CIA officer Robert Baer, “I can’t believe that those MPs knew enough about Arab culture to systematically do this.… Somebody prompted them.”

Intelligence officials deny directing the abuse. But the Army’s investigation said military intelligence and “other government agencies” — the Army’s code for the CIA, Defense Intelligence Agency and special operations forces, “actively requested that MP guards set physical and mental conditions for favorable interrogation of witnesses.”

The general who was in charge of the prison says it got out of hand. Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski remembers, “They said, ‘Hey, that worked pretty well.’ They told us to take the clothes away from those six prisoners, and nobody seemed to think that that was wrong, so let’s take clothes away from 12 of them.”

Now the CIA confirms that some of its officers hid prisoners from watchdog groups like the Red Cross — violations also under investigation.

2004 MSNBC Interactive
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4917567
http://bellaciao.org/en/article.php3?id_article=953

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 CONTRACTORS:
TITAN CORP & CACI INFO:


Titan Corporation & Homeland Security
http://www.titan.com/

Press Releases
May 3, 2004
Titan Reports First Quarter Revenues of $459 Million, Up 21%
http://www.titan.com/investor/press-releases/press_releases_display_2004.html?id=28&select=6

Titan's business focus includes:
Homeland Security and War on Terrorism;
http://www.titan.com/about/

Titan Board of Directors
http://www.titan.com/about/board.html?select=4

-------------------------------------
CACI CORP ("At CACI supporting America's National Security is more than just words it's our business....")
http://www.caci.com
CACI Board of Directors
http://www.caci.com/about/management.shtml

CACI INVESTORS INFO & LOGO

http://www.caci.com/investor.shtml 
CACI SEC FILINGS: http://www.shareholder.com/caci/sec.cfm?DocType=&Year= 


CACI NEWS RELEASE CONCERNING THE ABUSED IRAQI PRISONERS
http://www.caci.com/about/news/news2004/05_05_04_NR.html

Is Torture the American Way?

EXCERPT:
http://www.aljazeerah.info/Opinion%20editorials/2004%20opinions/May/8o/Is%20Torture%20the%20American%20Way%20Michael%20Saba.htm
Much has yet to be revealed in the Abu Gharib aftermath. We already know much about the torture thanks to journalists like Sy Hersh who wrote an expose of the torture incidents and released information on a previously secret lengthy report on Abu Gharib by Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba. Taguba is incidentally only the second Filipino-American to become an army general and, as a minority in the American military, he showed great sensitivity to the plight of the Iraqi prisoners. Taguba pointed out that, though soldiers pictured in the torture photos were complicit in their actions, it was the ultimate responsibility of various private contractors and the soldiers’ superiors who gave the orders.

Various individuals working for US military contractors, CACI and Titan were cited in the Taguba report. Those individuals included Steven Stephanowicz and John Israel. CACI is a huge private military contractor for the US military. It provides information and translation relation services to the armed forces. CACI has strong links to Israel as well. The CEO of CACI, J.P. “Jack” London was awarded the Albert Einstein Technology Award by the Jerusalem Fund of Aish HaTorah which was presented by Israeli Defense Minister Shaul Mofaz in January. At that juncture, CACI proudly announced that as a provider of information technology to help fight the war on terrorism, it was helping to transform the Middle East “from a source of global instability into a peaceful, stable region.” London visited Israel earlier this year with a delegation for a homeland security conference. Hersh in a previous article pointed out that during the course of the war in Iraq, a stronger Israeli-US alliance has been taking covert shape. Hersh stated “Israeli commandos and intelligence units have been working closely with their American counterparts at the Special Forces training base at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, and in Israel to help them prepare for operations in Iraq. Israeli commandos are expected to serve as ad-hoc advisers — again, in secret— when full-field operations begin”. The Guardian newspaper has also reported on Israeli military activities with American forces training for and based in Iraq. It also appears that Israeli interrogation/torture methods used on the Palestinians for many years might also have found their way into Iraqi prison camps.

Jason Raimondo in Antiwar.com also mentions that one of the American interrogators at Abu Gharib, Joe Ryan, in posting his diary on a website stated, “I went through the DOD Strategic Debriefer Course, Israeli Interrogation Course, and the SCAN Course.” So the Israelis and their friends such as Alan Dershowitz seem to be setting the agenda again. On the other hand, it may be just as US Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld said recently, “I’m not a lawyer. My impression is that what has been charged thus far is abuse, which I believe technically is different from torture.” As Pogo, the cartoon character once said, “We have met the enemy and he is us.”
http://www.aljazeerah.info/Opinion%20editorials/2004%20opinions/May/8o/Is%20Torture%20the%20American%20Way%20Michael%20Saba.htm
Also see Part 6 http://www.apfn.org/apfn/POW6.htm

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PoW abuse: Troops punished, contractors get away
FARAH STOCKMAN

WASHINGTON, MAY 4: A legal loophole could allow four American civilian contractors allegedly involved in the abuse of Iraqi prisoners to escape punishment, US Military officials and specialists said on Monday.

US commanders in Iraq announced that seven military supervisors have received administrative reprimands over the alleged abuse at Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad. Lt Gen Ricardo Sanchez, commander of US forces in Iraq, said the probe into the supervisors was complete and they would not face further proceedings.

Letters of reprimand were issued to the seven on Saturday, a Pentagon spokesman said, adding that two of the supervisors were relieved of their positions of responsibility. Another six soldiers are already facing criminal charges before a court martial.

But the four civilian workers identified in an internal Army report for their involvement in the physical and sexual mistreatment of the prisoners — including the alleged rape of one detainee — cannot be punished under military law.

The Army report — written in February and obtained by The New Yorker magazine — found evidence that civilian interrogators employed by the Virginia-based firm CACI and civilian interpreters with the San Diego-based Titan Corp were directly involved in the abuses. The internal Army investigation, written by Army Major General Antonio M. Taguba, recommended that CACI employee Steven Stephanowicz be fired and also identified civilian translators Adel L. Nakhla and John Israel, for their alleged roles in the mistreatment of prisoners according to The New Yorker, which said Taguba reserved his ‘‘harshest criticism for civilian contractors’’.

The allegations of prisoner abuse range from sodomising a prisoner with a chemical lightstick to forcing Iraqi prisoners to simulate sex acts on film and connecting wires to the genitals of one prisoner. One US spokeswoman in Baghdad said the military usually refers such cases back to the companies that employ them, and she believed that is what is being done in this case. ‘‘The Military can make recommendations, but it is going to be up to the employer to decide what measures to take.’’

But CACI chief executive Jack London said on Monday that the firm has not received any information from the US government or military about the alleged crimes.
http://www.indianexpress.com/full_story.php?content_id=46331

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Prisoner-Abuse Report Adds to Titan's Troubles
Lockheed Plan to Buy Firm Already Stalled

By Renae Merle
Washington Post Staff Writer
Friday, May 7, 2004; Page E03

When Lockheed Martin Corp. announced plans last September to acquire Titan Corp., a San Diego defense contractor, Wall Street cheered the move as a solid technology buy that would attract profitable contracts.

Eight months later, the proposed acquisition has stalled as Titan seeks to resolve allegations of unethical conduct. Titan's latest hurdle: An Army investigation has found that at least one of the firm's translators may have been involved in abuses of Iraqi detainees at the Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad. Titan is already awaiting completion of a Justice Department investigation into allegations that its consultants made improper payments to foreign officials.

"It couldn't be worse from a PR standpoint. The allegation and what seems to have happened [in Iraq], it's terrible. [But] one would hope that this would be viewed as anomaly," said Mark Jordan, industry analyst for A.G. Edwards & Sons.

"Certainly if you're Lockheed Martin, you don't want to buy a company that could sully your reputation, which is the most important thing a government contractor has," said Tim Quillin, an industry analyst at Stephens Inc.

Still, Wall Street analysts do not expect Titan's Iraq troubles to derail Lockheed's acquisition of the company, whose translation business has proved particularly lucrative. "I don't think this will have any impact," said Brett Lambert, defense consultant for DFI International. "This is an isolated exposure. As a negotiating strategy it may have some relevance, but as a fundamental issue . . . there is nothing that would cause a pause or a delay."

Titan and CACI International Inc., which provided interrogators to the prison, are part of the Pentagon's efforts to have private industry fill a gap in military capabilities, industry analysts said. If the Pentagon punished the companies, that could deter others from offering outsourcing services, they said.

"The implications on this issue [are] substantially larger than this one contract. It impacts DOD's outsourcing strategy, and therefore they will be looking for solutions to address the issue, rather than point a finger at the contractors and have them reluctant to remain in this business," said Jon B. Kutler, chairman and chief executive officer of Quarterdeck Investment Partners LLP.

Titan's role in translating grew from its acquisition in 2001 of Fairfax-based BTG Inc. In 1999, BTG was awarded a five-year contract with the Army Intelligence and Security Command to provide translators. The contract was originally valued at $10 million. But in its 2003 annual report, Titan listed its translator services as one of its largest sources of income, accounting for 7 percent of its $1.8 billion in revenue.

"It was by far their biggest driver of growth in 2003," said Quillin.

Lockheed declined to comment on whether the prison investigation would influence its pursuit of Titan. Wil Williams, a Titan spokesman, said the company had not been notified that Titan employees were under investigation, and added that all workers were still on the job. He declined to comment on how the controversy might affect the company.

The Army report identifies John Israel as a Titan employee, but Williams said Israel worked for a subcontractor, which he declined to identify. Adel Nakhla, a Titan employee, is described in the report as a suspect and a witness. The report identifies another Titan employee, Torin S. Nelson, but doesn't indicate Nelson's involvement. None could be reached for comment.

Titan refused to detail its contract with the Pentagon. Most of the company's translators have security clearances and all are approved by the Pentagon after a background check, Williams said.

Titan has experienced other problems with the contract. A Titan translator stationed in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was indicted last year for mishandling sensitive information and making false statements to federal officials. Earlier this year, the Pentagon questioned Titan's billing for services.

The Justice Department bribery investigation poses a greater danger to Titan than the Iraq prison abuse inquiry, because the former could result in significant fines and limits on exports, analysts said. The company isn't likely to be held responsible in the prison abuse inquiry even if its employees are prosecuted, analysts said.

The bribery investigation prompted Lockheed to lower its bid for Titan by $200 million to $2.2 billion, including the assumption of debt. The closing date on the deal has been postponed twice.

Lockheed has said it won't close the Titan deal until the bribery investigation is completed.


The Washington Post  

=======================================================

05/06/04 Washington Post More Pictures Emerge

Iraqi Prisoners Controversy
Editor's Note: Some images in this gallery may be disturbing because of their violent or graphic nature.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A43783-2004May20.html

 Demonic 'Sadistic' Practices Used On Iraqi Prisoners

More Iraq prison photos emerge
Graphic images may provide more evidence of abuse


The Washington Post
A naked detainee at the Abu Ghraib prison is tethered by a leash to prison guard Army Pvt. Lynndie England in this photograph.

May 6: The new Washington Post photographs provide more damaging evidence in the scandal. NBC's Jim Miklaszewski reports.

By Christian Davenport

Updated: 10:13 a.m. ET May 06, 2004The collection of photographs begins like a travelogue from Iraq. Here are U.S. soldiers posing in front of a mosque. Here is a soldier riding a camel in the desert. And then: a soldier holding a leash tied around a man’s neck in an Iraqi prison. He is naked, grimacing and lying on the floor.

Mixed in with more than 1,000 digital pictures obtained by The Washington Post are photographs of naked men, apparently prisoners, sprawled on top of one another while soldiers stand around them. There is another photograph of a naked man with a dark hood over his head, handcuffed to a cell door. And another of a naked man handcuffed to a bunk bed, his arms splayed so wide that his back is arched. A pair of women’s underwear covers his head and face.

• Photo gallery (Editor's Note: Some images in this gallery may be disturbing because of their violent or graphic nature.)

The graphic images, passed around among military police who served at the Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad, are a new batch of photographs similar to those broadcast a week ago on CBS’s “60 Minutes II” and published by the New Yorker magazine. They appear to provide further visual evidence of the chaos and unprofessionalism at the prison detailed in a report by Army Maj. Gen. Antonio M. Taguba. His report, which relied in part on the photographs, found “numerous incidents of sadistic, blatant, and wanton criminal abuses” that were inflicted on detainees.

This group of photographs, taken from the summer of 2003 through the winter, range widely, from mundane images of everyday military life to pictures showing crude simulations of sex among soldiers. The new pictures appear to show American soldiers abusing prisoners, many of whom wear ID bands, but The Post could not eliminate the possibility that some of them were staged.

The photographs were taken by several digital cameras and loaded onto compact discs, which circulated among soldiers in the 372nd Military Police Company, an Army Reserve unit based in Cresaptown, Md. The pictures were among those seized by military investigators probing conditions at the prison, a source close to the unit said.

The investigation has led to charges being filed against six soldiers from the 372nd. “The allegations of abuse were substantiated by detailed witness statements and the discovery of extremely graphic photographic evidence,” Taguba’s report states.

For many units serving in Iraq, digital cameras are pervasive and yet another example of how technology has transformed the way troops communicate with relatives back home. From Basra to Baghdad, they e-mail pictures home. Some soldiers, including those in the 372nd, even packed video cameras along with their rifles and Kevlar helmets.

Bill Lawson, whose nephew, Staff Sgt. Ivan L. “Chip” Frederick, is one of the soldiers charged in the incident, said that Frederick sent home pictures from Iraq on a few occasions. They were “just ordinary photos, like a tourist would take” and nothing showing prisoner abuse, he said.

“I would say that’s something that’s very common that’s going on in Iraq because it’s so convenient and easy to do,” Lawson said of troops sending pictures home. He added that his nephew also mailed videocassettes “of him talking into a camcorder to [his wife] when he was going on his rounds.”

But in the case of prisoner abuse, the ubiquity of digital cameras has created a far more combustible international scandal than would have been sparked only by the release of Taguba’s searing written report. Since the “60 Minutes II” broadcast, pictures of abuse have been posted on the Internet and shown on television stations worldwide.

'Utter humiliation'
The photographs have been condemned by U.S. military commanders, President Bush and leaders around the world. They have sparked particularly strong indignation in the Middle East, where many people see them as reinforcing the notion “that the situation in Iraq is one of occupation,” said Shibley Telhami, who holds the Anwar Sadat Chair for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland.

The impact is heightened by religion and culture. Arabs “are even more offended when the issue has to do with nudity and sexuality,” he said. “The bottom line here is these are pictures of utter humiliation.”

It is unclear who took the photographs, or why.

Lawyers representing two of the accused soldiers, and some soldiers’ relatives, have said the pictures were ordered up by military intelligence officials who were trying to humiliate the detainees and coerce other prisoners into cooperating.

“It is clear that the intelligence community dictated that these photographs be taken,” said Guy L. Womack, a Houston lawyer representing Spec. Charles A. Graner Jr., 35, one of the soldiers charged.

The father of another soldier facing charges, Spec. Jeremy C. Sivits of Hyndman, Pa., also said his son was following orders. “He was asked to take pictures, and he did what he was told,” Daniel Sivits said in a telephone interview last week.

Military spokesmen at the U.S. Central Command in Qatar and at the Combined Joint Task Force 7 headquarters in Baghdad referred requests for comment about those claims to Col. Jill Morgenthaler, a U.S. military spokeswoman. Morgenthaler could not be reached by telephone yesterday and did not return requests to comment by e-mail. Requests to speak with Col. Thomas M. Pappas—who commands the 205th Military Intelligence Brigade, based in Germany, and whose troops were stationed at Abu Ghraib—were declined by a U.S. military spokesman for the Army’s V Corps in Heidelberg, Germany.

'That's not Lynn'
Yesterday, in Fort Ashby, W.Va., two siblings and a friend identified Pfc. Lynndie England, 21, as the soldier appearing in a picture holding a leash tied to the neck of a man on the floor. England, a member of the 372nd, has also been identified in published reports as one of the soldiers in the earlier set of pictures that were made public, which her relatives also confirmed yesterday. England has been reassigned to Fort Bragg, N.C., her family said. Attempts to reach her were unsuccessful. The military has not charged her in the case.

England’s friends and relatives said the photographs must have been staged. “It just makes me laugh, because that’s not Lynn,” said Destiny Goin, 21, a friend. “She wouldn’t pull a dog by its neck, let alone drag a human across a floor.”

England worked as a clerk in the unit, processing prisoners before they were put in cells, taking their names, fingerprinting them and giving them identification numbers, her family said. Other soldiers would ask her to pose for photographs, said her father, Kenneth England. “That’s how it happened,” he said.

Soon after CBS aired its photographs, Terrie England said she received a call from her daughter.

“ ‘Mom,’ she told me, ‘I was in the wrong place at the wrong time,’ “ Terrie England said.

The pictures obtained by The Post include shots of soldiers simulating sexually explicit acts with one another and shots of a cow being skinned and gutted and soldiers posing with its severed head. There are also dozens of pictures of a cat’s severed head.

Other photographs show wounded men and dead bodies. In one, a dead man is lying in the back of a truck, his shirt, face and left arm covered in blood. His right arm is missing. Another photograph shows a dead body, gray and decomposing. A young soldier is leaning over the corpse, smiling broadly and giving the “thumbs-up” sign.

And in another picture a young woman lifts her shirt, exposing her breasts. She is wearing a white band with numbers on her wrist, but it is unclear whether she is a prisoner.

Staff writers Michael Amon, Scott Higham and Josh White contributed to this report.

2004 The Washington Post Company
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A43783-2004May20.html


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Republicans put heat on Rumsfeld over Iraqi abuses
New photos surface on eve of Senate testimony

NBC, MSNBC and news services
Updated: 12:24 p.m. ET May 06, 2004WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, reportedly already admonished by President Bush, was feeling the heat Thursday as new Iraqi prisoner abuse photos surfaced and Senate Republicans made clear they were unhappy with Rumsfeld's handling of the scandal.

A senior Republican Senate aide told NBC's Norah O'Donnell that Sen. John Warner, R-Va. and chairman of the Armed Services Committee, "is trying to throw Rumsfeld a life line, but there is real outrage about this."

Rumsfeld was called to testify Friday before the committee, but rejected Warner's request that he appear alone and for a reasonable period of time. Rumsfeld instead insisted on a two-hour limit and that three other Pentagon officials join him.

"You can see what is going on here," said the aide.

Congressional sources earlier told NBC News that Warner intended to hold up military promotions until high-ranking military officers were disciplined.

Republicans also fault the Army for coming to the Hill last Monday without the internal report spelling out the abuses at the Abu Ghraib prison outside Baghdad. Senators instead were forced to download it online.

In an editorial, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch called for Rumsfeld to resign over the “botched handling” of the investigation and over earlier Iraq war decisions. And New York Times columnist Thomas L. Friedman called on Bush to fire Rumsfeld “today, not tomorrow or next month.”


Should Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld be fired? * 36463 responses


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70%

No
30%

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Asked about the column, Republican Sen. John McCain told CBS that “I don’t presume to tell the president what he should do, but it’s obvious that there’s a lot of explaining that Secretary Rumsfeld and others have to do.”

McCain also said the Abu Ghraib prison should be razed because it is a symbol of torture and mistreatment “both from the Saddam Hussein regime and this one.”

Some top Democrats called Thursday for Rumsfeld's removal, including Sen. Tim Harkin, D-Iowa, and House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.

“If he does not resign forthwith, the president should fire him,” said Harkin, whose statement came as White House spokesman Scott McClellan said President Bush “absolutely” wants his defense secretary to remain in office.

Bush 'absolutely' confident in Rumsfeld
Bush on Wednesday tried to calm the anger with interviews on Arab television, and White House sources said he privately admonished Rumsfeld for not having told him that photos of some of the abuses had been taken.

• New photos
May 6: New photos provide more damaging evidence in the scandal. NBC's Jim Miklaszewski reports.

One White House source said Rumsfeld himself did not know about the images of naked prisoners and gloating U.S. soldiers until CBS broadcast them last week.

New photos emerged Thursday to fuel the fire.

The Washington Post said it had obtained a new batch of more than 1,000 digital photos from Iraq. The newspaper said the photos ranged from snapshots depicting everyday military life to graphic images of various kinds of abuse.

A front page photo showed a female soldier holding a leash around a naked man’s neck at Abu Ghraib prison. Friends and relatives of the soldier with the leash said the photo must have been staged, the Post said.

Red Cross: We asked for changes
The International Red Cross, for its part, said Thursday that months before the abuse cases surfaced it had repeatedly asked U.S. authorities to improve conditions at Abu Ghraib prison.

Noting that Red Cross representatives had been visiting the prison and talking privately with detainees, spokeswoman Nada Doumani said in Geneva, “We were aware of what was going on, and based on our findings we have repeatedly requested the U.S. authorities to take corrective action.”

The Bush administration is also dealing with the Army’s acknowledgment that at least a dozen deaths at prisons and detention camps remained under scrutiny by criminal investigators.

The CIA’s inspector general also was looking into three deaths that may have involved agency officers or contractors, intelligence officials said. It was unclear how many of these CIA investigations involved the same prison deaths as the military’s investigators, although Army officials said at least one did.

Politic fallout
Sen. John Kerry, Bush’s Democratic rival, said the president did not go far enough Wednesday in telling Arab television viewers that the behavior of a few soldiers was "abhorrent" and that those responsible would be "brought to justice."

“The president of the United States needs to offer the world an explanation and needs to take appropriate responsibility,” Kerry said. “And if that includes apologizing for the behavior of those soldiers and what happened, they ought to do that.”

May 5: President Bush did not apologize for the abuse in two interviews hastily arranged to contain outrage in the Arab world. NBC’s David Gregory reports.
Nightly News

The difficulty of Bush’s task became clear in the first question from an Arab TV interviewer who said there was evidence of torture that made many Arabs believe the United States was no better than Saddam Hussein’s government, notorious for torture and murder. The president murmured under his breath at the comparison.

Bush said the abuses were “terrible” for America’s image abroad. “I think people in the Middle East who want to dislike America will use this as an excuse to remind people about their dislike,” he told Al-Arabiya television, a satellite channel based in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, that is popular around the Arab world.

Afterward, White House press secretary Scott McClellan later used the word “sorry” a half-dozen times in a briefing for reporters. “The president is sorry for what occurred and the pain it has caused,” he said.

Asked why Bush himself had not apologized, McClellan said: “I’m saying it now for him.”

In Iraq, Maj. Gen. Geoffrey Miller, the new commander of U.S.-run prisons, apologized Wednesday for the abuse and said he would invite observers from the Red Cross and Iraqi government to open offices at Abu Ghraib prison.

Reaction in the region to Bush’s remarks was generally skeptical.

“Bush’s statements today will not restore the dignity which the tortured detainees lost,” said Sari Mouwaffaq, a Baghdad mechanic. “Bush’s apology, or his attempt to find excuses, has no value to us.”

But Raad Youssef, a 49-year-old teacher in Baghdad, said that during Saddam’s rule, “there were many genocides that were committed and nobody dared to reveal them at that time and now officials of the former regime did not try to apologize. Bush’s attempt to repair the damage is a good thing in my opinion.”

Allegations, and the accused
Six military police officers were charged with criminal violations on March 20. Seven other officers, all of them military police, have been given noncriminal punishment — in six of the cases, letters of reprimand.

The Army’s report on the investigation, which was begun in January by Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba, condemns a “pervasive atmosphere” of laxness at Abu Ghraib. It describes the abuses depicted in the photographs as “horrific” and “wanton acts of soldiers in an unsupervised and dangerous setting.”

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/4855930/

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Posted on Thu, May. 06, 2004

CONFLICT IN IRAQ

Detainees' abuse called illegal, immoral

The humiliation of Iraqi prisoners by U.S. troops was a violation of the Geneva Conventions and 'the greatest self-inflicted wound we could have had,' experts said.

BY AMY DRISCOLL AND DANIEL de VISE

Miami Herald

Iraqi detainees at the Abu Ghraib prison don't fall under the rules that apply to prisoners of war, but the abuse from U.S. troops still violates the most basic rules of international law and military engagement, experts said Wednesday.

''This stuff crossed the line -- it's both immoral and illegal,'' said Robert K. Goldman, professor of law at American University in Washington, D.C.

''If these are peaceable civilians -- and I understand most of them are -- they are entitled to protection under the Geneva Conventions,'' he said. ``Even if they were part of the resistance, they are protected. You can't beat them up, you can't humiliate them. You're not supposed to torture, no matter what.''

GLOBAL OUTRAGE

Labeled Wednesday as ''abhorrent'' by President Bush, treatment of the prisoners became the subject of international outrage after the first pictures of the abuse surfaced a week ago. The photos, showing American GIs grinning over nude prisoners, sparked calls for a Senate resolution to condemn the abuses.

''Bin Laden couldn't have bought this if he tried. This is the greatest self-inflicted wound we could have had in the Middle East,'' Goldman said.

The Geneva Conventions of 1949, to which the U.S. is a party, require that all detainees be treated humanely, including noncombatant civilians captured during an armed conflict. U.S. military rules have similar provisions.

Goldman, who teaches a course in the law of war, says the revelations of abuse come at a time of increasing ''outsourcing'' of traditionally military activities to private contractors or other governmental agencies, including the CIA, that may operate outside normal channels of discipline and oversight.

''There is an unease, and you hear people in this city wondering whether part of this comes from the highest level, and that maybe people think this is a different kind of war and anything goes,'' Goldman said. ``There's an odor here of something like ends justify the means.''

But is it legal to put a bag over the head of a detainee during interrogation? Make him stand for a long period of time?

''That's not clear. There's no consensus. Certainly, U.S. interrogators didn't seem to think it was wrong,'' said Joe Stork, Washington director of the Middle East division of Human Rights Watch. ``It's not torture to keep a person standing -- depending on how long.''

Stripping a person to make sure he isn't a suicide bomber is one thing; stripping him and forcing him into a human pyramid and then snapping his picture is something else entirely, experts said.

NOT EASY TO EXPLAIN

On Wednesday, the government portrayed the abuse as illegal acts by renegade soldiers, promising a full investigation and appropriate punishment, but Stork said the incidents -- including a photo of a servicewoman grinning and giving a thumbs-up sign over a pyramid of captives apparently simulating sodomy -- aren't that easy to explain away.

''Torture is cruel and degrading -- you don't have to read a handbook to know that. And certainly if you were a prison guard, as some were, they should have known,'' he said.

And in the Arab world, the sexual nature of the humiliation is even greater than most Americans can imagine, representing a grave violation of cultural codes and a broad affront to centuries of buttoned-down sexual tradition.

The sexually humiliating photographs, some depicting simulated sodomy or masturbation, offend human decency. But Arab and Muslim scholars in America say they have even greater power to shock the Arab public because they defy age-old Arab taboos against seeing people in any stage of undress -- especially in a sexual context -- outside the marital bed.

''There are no words in the English language that can express the anger and the outrage that the people of the Muslim world are using to describe this,'' said Moataz Fattah, assistant professor of political science at Central Michigan University.

It is a central tenet of Muslim faith that God has put men and women on Earth to live modest and decent lives. And the broader Arab world, including Christian communities, remains deeply traditional by comparison to mainstream America, scholars say.

''Generally, throughout the Middle East, people are very closed about showing their bodies,'' said Gordon Newby, professor of Middle Eastern studies at Emory University in Atlanta. ``The display of the human body, and particularly the sexual areas of the human body, are things that just aren't done.''

Most damaging, those scholars say, are a handful of photographs that show the captives in sexual situations that go beyond the imaginings of most Arabs. One shows a female U.S. soldier pointing at an Iraqi man masturbating.

''When men are shown not only in the nude but forced to masturbate by a woman who's not even their wife, you are then heaping a series of almost deliberate cultural humiliations onto that individual,'' said Akbar Ahmed, chair of Islamic studies at American University in Washington, D.C.

``What she's really saying is, I represent the conquering civilization. I am the conqueror. I am the victor.''

MEANING KNOWN

Ahmed allows that this violation of Muslim and Arab standards by the American soldiers may have resulted from ''gross ignorance or prejudice or stupidity.'' But the more common view, among several Islamic scholars interviewed Wednesday, was that the soldiers and their overseers knew the symbolic meaning of the sexual acts and meant to exploit it, presumably to ''break'' the captives so that they would talk.

''American soldiers are well-versed. They are well-trained. They have been in Iraq for over a year now. They understand the Muslim religion,'' said Altaf Ali, Florida spokesman for the Council on American-Islamic Relations. ``They know by now that being portrayed in public naked is something horrendous.''

http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/nation/8604609.htm?1c

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Experts agree: Geneva rules broken
Thursday, May 06, 2004

By Lillian Thomas and Steve Levin, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Iraqi prisoners hooded, naked and posed. American soldiers laughing, pointing and mocking.

The recent photographs of U.S. military personnel humiliating and abusing Iraqi captives in the notorious Abu Ghraib prison have appalled political and military leaders. Court martial proceedings already are under way, and President Bush yesterday expressed his sorrow at the abuse to Iraq and the Arab world on satellite TV.

The complicity of the American soldiers in those abuses as well as in the deaths of 10 Iraqi prisoners has led to soul-searching questions. Was it a breakdown in training and leadership or a lack of morality? Are these war crimes or just an example of the measures societies must be willing to accept in the course of war?

"The rules of war and the rules of captivity are the same," said Gary Solis, an adjunct professor of law at Georgetown University Law Center who teaches a course called "The Law of War."

Solis, who served two tours of duty in Vietnam as a Marine, said he could "appreciate the need for intel gathering, of wringing from POWs every bit of information one can without resorting to physical violence.

"But as an academician, I know they can't do that."

The reason, he said, is the Third Geneva Convention, which was ratified in 1929 and adopted in 1950 as part of the Geneva Conventions. The third convention regards the treatment of prisoners of war. Two of its articles are applicable to the current situation in Iraq.

Among the many prohibitions in Article 3 concerning treatment of prisoners of war are "outrages upon personal dignity, in particular, humiliating and degrading treatment."

Article 13 stipulates that "prisoners of war must at all times be humanely treated."

And, Solis said, it doesn't matter that Iraqis were responsible for the gruesome killing of four American contract workers in March. After they were killed, Iraqis burned the bodies, dragged them behind vehicles through downtown Fallujah and then hung at least two corpses from a bridge.

"You can't justify our wrongdoing by the fact that they did it," he said. "We don't judge events by comparing them to other events."

Steven R. Ratner, a professor of international law at the University of Texas at Austin, called the American abuse of Iraqi prisoners "a war crime."

"It's a grave breach of the Geneva Conventions," he said. "There's no question that these actions are a violation of that convention. The obligations could not be clearer.

"This inhumane treatment and this kind of humiliation is a war crime."

But a military interrogator says that using methods that make people queasy is not more outrageous than killing or maiming them in the course of war.

Mike Ritz, a former U.S. Army interrogator, said that what appears to have taken place at Abu Ghraib prison indicates a breakdown in command that resulted in poor procedures, but that the broader question of what measures societies are willing to accept in the course of war is being lost in the chorus of angry responses.

"I don't think society is ready for it: If we abuse this person, we're going to save lives," said Ritz, who now runs Team Delta, a Philadelphia-based firm that trains interrogators.

"We're all upset with the idea of prisoners being stripped naked and humiliated, but if we have true confidence that it will save lives, why is that? Don't we at the same time accept that we bomb and kill people to save lives?"

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., a prisoner of war for five years in Vietnam, said that the humane treatment of prisoners is fundamental for both ethical and practical reasons.

"It's one thing to have people fighting in combat in relatively equal terms and it's another to deal with people who are defenseless," McCain said. "In addition, we can't hope our soldiers will be treated fairly as prisoners of war if we don't treat prisoners well."

McCain said that during his captivity he was not treated according to the Geneva Conventions.

"More of my comrades would have returned from prison had we been treated that way," he said.

Richard Godlewski was an 18-year-old U.S. Army private when he was captured by Chinese troops in February 1951 near Hongsong, South Korea. When he asked to be treated according to the Geneva Conventions, a guard hit him in the mouth with a rifle butt, breaking several teeth.

"They're throwing the Geneva Conventions around like it was something great," said Godlewski, now 71 and living in Carteret, N.J. "I was in Korea and they didn't follow the Geneva Conventions. I didn't hear the American public make a big hullabaloo about that."

During his 30 months of captivity, Godlewski lost 70 pounds and, after a failed escape, was forced to live for stretches of time in a 4-by-4-by-4 enclosure. Desperate for food, he ate meat from a maggot-infested dead mule and drank his own urine.

Ritz said interrogations can be improved through the use of what he called "effective" torture.

"There are forms of mild torture that are effective," he said. "The problem is, if you're not good at questioning, you'll get answers you're looking for, not the truth."

A skilled interrogator rarely has to resort to violence, Ritz said, but he certainly uses deceit and psychological warfare to get information.

Becoming a skilled interrogator takes years of training, he said, but many Army interrogators receive only about a year's worth of basic training. Military police have no training in interrogating prisoners, since their role is to be "passive" gatherers of information.

"The MP is your eyes and ears," Ritz said. "He's listening to the prisoners, he lives with them practically. By no means should the MP be actively involved in interrogation."

The MP can tell interrogators who appears to be the leader, who's talkative, who's depressed, he said.

"But without good training and supervision, a situation can get out of hand quickly. Those people on the bottom rung, those lower-rank soldiers, they're young, immature, frightened. You start to lose sight of the fact that in front of us are human beings."

A famous experiment at Stanford University showed how quickly it can happen. In 1971, a group of young men who had agreed to participate in a psychology experiment were randomly divided into two groups -- one was given uniforms and told that they would be the guards; the others were the prisoners.

"In a few days, the role dominated the person," said Philip Zimbardo, the professor who designed and ran the experiment, in an interview for The Stanford Report.

"They became guards and prisoners," he said. The guards became so sadistic and the prisoners so depressed that Zimbardo called off the experiment after six days.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(Lillian Thomas can be reached at 412-263-3566 or lthomas@post-gazette.com . Steve Levin can be reached at 412-263-1919 or slevin@post-gazette.com http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/04127/311907.stm

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How Bush was caught out by torture furore
By David Rennie
(Filed: 06/05/2004)

As the Bush administration reeled from the worst scandal of the war on terrorism, one question baffled Washington yesterday: why did President George W Bush and his top aides not see this coming?


The Pentagon's leadership has known about the Abu Ghraib abuses for months. Gen Richard Myers, the top US commander as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, knew weeks ago that CBS television was to break the story in its 60 Minutes II documentary programme.

His response was to ask CBS to hold the story for two weeks to avoid inflaming unrest in the city of Fallujah.

The Pentagon's response did not include warning Congress, who learned about Abu Ghraib the way the rest of official Washington did: from CBS television last week.

The administration has been well served in the past by its focus on secrecy, news management and avoiding leaks. This time, however, Mr Bush has been left scrambling to catch up with an explosion of global outrage.

As late as Sunday, Gen Myers admitted he had not read a highly critical report into abuses at Abu Ghraib, completed in March by an army general, Antonio Taguba. This week, Mr Rumsfeld admitted he too had only reviewed a summary of the report.

Gen Peter Pace, the vice chairman of the joint chiefs, denied all talk of a cover-up. He protested that Brig Gen Mark Kimmitt, the US military spokesman in Baghdad, had alerted the media to allegations of abuse as early as mid-January and in March said six military personnel had been charged.

However, when pressed, senior Pentagon officials conceded that those two announcements were buried, or sneaked out, over a weekend. Gen Pace was technically correct to say that, on March 20, Brig Kimmitt told reporters in Baghdad that six soldiers had been charged with assault, indecency and cruelty against prisoners.

But the briefing took place at the weekend, was not relayed to the press in Washington, as normally happens, and is not included in the Pentagon's official media archives.

A senior defence official said there was no apparent record of Brig Kimmitt's January announcement that abuse allegations were being investigated. "I believe he did speak with reporters about the investigation being under way. I think it might have been a background briefing."

Now, thanks to the leaks of the past week, the world knows the details of the official investigation by Maj Gen Taguba and its findings that "numerous incidents of sadistic, blatant and wanton criminal abuses were inflicted on detainees".

Gen Taguba's findings go beyond the shocking photographs of abuse broadcast on worldwide television.

He reported male detainees were kept naked for several days at a time; detainees were sodomised with a chemical light and, possibly, a broomhandle; detainees were attacked with dogs; phosphoric acid was poured on detainees and male prisoners were forced to wear female underwear.

A dog chain was placed around a naked prisoner's neck so a woman soldier could pose for a photograph. Groups of male prisoners were forced to masturbate while being videotaped. Prisoners were forcibly arranged in sexually explicit positions for photographing.

A prisoner alleged to have raped a 15-year-old fellow detainee was photographed naked with "I am a rapeist" [sic] written on his leg. A male military policeman had sex with a female detainee.

The Pentagon said on Monday that criminal investigations are under way into 25 detainee deaths and 10 assaults in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The administration and senior US officers have portrayed the abuses as the acts of a small number of "bad apples", pleading with Americans to remember the good works of US troops.

But senior Republicans and Democrats in Congress have dismissed that explanation, pointing to the general's conclusion that military policemen were not acting alone. Gen Taguba found that military and civilian intelligence officers "actively requested that [military police] guards set physical and mental conditions for favourable interrogation of witnesses".

The report also sheds some light on the role played by private contractors hired by the CIA and other agencies as interrogators, whose murky legal status could yet see them avoid prosecution.

One of the killings being investigated involves a CIA contract interrogator in Afghanistan.

A 34-year-old Iraqi man identified himself as the prisoner at the centre of one of the most chilling pictures of abuse, writes Alec Russell.

Hayder Sabbar told the New York Times that he was the man photographed wearing nothing but a hood, with his hands on his head and a grinning American woman soldier at his side pointing at his genitals.

Speaking of his shame at the abuse he endured last November, he said he was never interrogated and never charged with a crime.

"The truth is that we were not terrorists," he said. "We were just ordinary people and American intelligence knew this."
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/northamerica/usa/1461150/How-Bush-was-caught-out-by-torture-furore.html

==================================================================

A look at life for the hundreds held in Abu Ghraib prison

CAMERON SIMPSON May 06 2004

WAVING a prosthetic leg over his head, one prisoner shouted: "Where's the freedom Bush? Is this freedom?"
Another read a message through a megaphone, protesting about the abuse of Iraqis' freedom, dignity, and rights.
The men were among hundreds of prisoners who clamoured to be heard yesterday as the US military took journalists to see Abu Ghraib prison, where American troops are accused of torturing and humiliating Iraqis.
Although desperate to limit the damage from a widening prisoner-abuse scandal, journalists were not allowed to film, photograph or talk to prisoners and their access was restricted to parts of the facility that US forces wanted to show them.
At least 10 of the prisoners were on crutches – apparently wounded in a recent mortar bombardment of the prison which killed 22 detainees.
Some of the inmates appeared to be in their early teens. Others were old and bearded and walked with the aid of sticks. One young man, who appeared to be blind, was escorted by a friend who desperately tried to point out his incapacity.
Major General Geoffrey Miller, brought in to run the jail after the dismissal of Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, who was in charge when the abuses are alleged to have taken place last year, said the ages of detainees ranged from 12 to 80.
About 3900 prisoners are held at Abu Ghraib, Iraq's largest prison and notorious under Saddam Hussein for torture, abuse, and executions. The vast majority were arrested for "anti-coalition activities".
They are mostly held in outdoor encampments, razor-wire zones measuring about 300 yards by 300 yards containing around two dozen large tents, erected on hard mud. There is running water for the 400 or so prisoners housed in each of eight camps, Major Miller said.
Air-conditioning will be installed this month, as temperatures rise rapidly towards the worst of summer, when they can hit 120F, he said. Lookout towers stand throughout the complex and high-powered lamps ring the perimeter of the razor-wire pens.
Major Miller, who used to run the Guantanamo Bay "Camp X-ray" facility, took around 30 journalists to see a new medical wing built in the past three months, including a ward with 10 patients, most strapped to the beds by leather restraints on one arm and a leg.
He then showed off a collection of recently-constructed interrogation rooms, complete with one-way mirrors for secret monitoring, where detainees are questioned by military intelligence or other officials through a translator.
Colonel Foster Payne, head of the military intelligence brigade at Abu Ghraib, said his men used only standard interrogation methods and never resorted to violence or intimidation. He said he had had no reports of abuse on his watch.
Major Miller also took the group to see wing 1A and 1B, where the worst abuses are alleged to have taken place. The wing, comprising 103 tight, windowless cells, is now occupied by five women accused of anti-coalition activities.
WAVING a prosthetic leg over his head, one prisoner shouted: "Where's the freedom Bush? Is this freedom?"
Another read a message through a megaphone, protesting about the abuse of Iraqis' freedom, dignity, and rights.
The men were among hundreds of prisoners who clamoured to be heard yesterday as the US military took journalists to see Abu Ghraib prison, where American troops are accused of torturing and humiliating Iraqis.
Although desperate to limit the damage from a widening prisoner-abuse scandal, journalists were not allowed to film, photograph or talk to prisoners and their access was restricted to parts of the facility that US forces wanted to show them.
At least 10 of the prisoners were on crutches – apparently wounded in a recent mortar bombardment of the prison which killed 22 detainees.
Some of the inmates appeared to be in their early teens. Others were old and bearded and walked with the aid of sticks. One young man, who appeared to be blind, was escorted by a friend who desperately tried to point out his incapacity.
Major General Geoffrey Miller, brought in to run the jail after the dismissal of Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, who was in charge when the abuses are alleged to have taken place last year, said the ages of detainees ranged from 12 to 80.
About 3900 prisoners are held at Abu Ghraib, Iraq's largest prison and notorious under Saddam Hussein for torture, abuse, and executions. The vast majority were arrested for "anti-coalition activities".
They are mostly held in outdoor encampments, razor-wire zones measuring about 300 yards by 300 yards containing around two dozen large tents, erected on hard mud. There is running water for the 400 or so prisoners housed in each of eight camps, Major Miller said.
Air-conditioning will be installed this month, as temperatures rise rapidly towards the worst of summer, when they can hit 120F, he said. Lookout towers stand throughout the complex and high-powered lamps ring the perimeter of the razor-wire pens.
Major Miller, who used to run the Guantanamo Bay "Camp X-ray" facility, took around 30 journalists to see a new medical wing built in the past three months, including a ward with 10 patients, most strapped to the beds by leather restraints on one arm and a leg.
He then showed off a collection of recently-constructed interrogation rooms, complete with one-way mirrors for secret monitoring, where detainees are questioned by military intelligence or other officials through a translator.
Colonel Foster Payne, head of the military intelligence brigade at Abu Ghraib, said his men used only standard interrogation methods and never resorted to violence or intimidation. He said he had had no reports of abuse on his watch.
Major Miller also took the group to see wing 1A and 1B, where the worst abuses are alleged to have taken place. The wing, comprising 103 tight, windowless cells, is now occupied by five women accused of anti-coalition activities.
WAVING a prosthetic leg over his head, one prisoner shouted: "Where's the freedom Bush? Is this freedom?"
Another read a message through a megaphone, protesting about the abuse of Iraqis' freedom, dignity, and rights.
The men were among hundreds of prisoners who clamoured to be heard yesterday as the US military took journalists to see Abu Ghraib prison, where American troops are accused of torturing and humiliating Iraqis.
Although desperate to limit the damage from a widening prisoner-abuse scandal, journalists were not allowed to film, photograph or talk to prisoners and their access was restricted to parts of the facility that US forces wanted to show them.
At least 10 of the prisoners were on crutches – apparently wounded in a recent mortar bombardment of the prison which killed 22 detainees.
Some of the inmates appeared to be in their early teens. Others were old and bearded and walked with the aid of sticks. One young man, who appeared to be blind, was escorted by a friend who desperately tried to point out his incapacity.
Major General Geoffrey Miller, brought in to run the jail after the dismissal of Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, who was in charge when the abuses are alleged to have taken place last year, said the ages of detainees ranged from 12 to 80.
About 3900 prisoners are held at Abu Ghraib, Iraq's largest prison and notorious under Saddam Hussein for torture, abuse, and executions. The vast majority were arrested for "anti-coalition activities".
They are mostly held in outdoor encampments, razor-wire zones measuring about 300 yards by 300 yards containing around two dozen large tents, erected on hard mud. There is running water for the 400 or so prisoners housed in each of eight camps, Major Miller said.
Air-conditioning will be installed this month, as temperatures rise rapidly towards the worst of summer, when they can hit 120F, he said. Lookout towers stand throughout the complex and high-powered lamps ring the perimeter of the razor-wire pens.
Major Miller, who used to run the Guantanamo Bay "Camp X-ray" facility, took around 30 journalists to see a new medical wing built in the past three months, including a ward with 10 patients, most strapped to the beds by leather restraints on one arm and a leg.
He then showed off a collection of recently-constructed interrogation rooms, complete with one-way mirrors for secret monitoring, where detainees are questioned by military intelligence or other officials through a translator.
Colonel Foster Payne, head of the military intelligence brigade at Abu Ghraib, said his men used only standard interrogation methods and never resorted to violence or intimidation. He said he had had no reports of abuse on his watch.
Major Miller also took the group to see wing 1A and 1B, where the worst abuses are alleged to have taken place. The wing, comprising 103 tight, windowless cells, is now occupied by five women accused of anti-coalition activities.
WAVING a prosthetic leg over his head, one prisoner shouted: "Where's the freedom Bush? Is this freedom?"
Another read a message through a megaphone, protesting about the abuse of Iraqis' freedom, dignity, and rights.
The men were among hundreds of prisoners who clamoured to be heard yesterday as the US military took journalists to see Abu Ghraib prison, where American troops are accused of torturing and humiliating Iraqis.
Although desperate to limit the damage from a widening prisoner-abuse scandal, journalists were not allowed to film, photograph or talk to prisoners and their access was restricted to parts of the facility that US forces wanted to show them.
At least 10 of the prisoners were on crutches – apparently wounded in a recent mortar bombardment of the prison which killed 22 detainees.
Some of the inmates appeared to be in their early teens. Others were old and bearded and walked with the aid of sticks. One young man, who appeared to be blind, was escorted by a friend who desperately tried to point out his incapacity.
Major General Geoffrey Miller, brought in to run the jail after the dismissal of Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, who was in charge when the abuses are alleged to have taken place last year, said the ages of detainees ranged from 12 to 80.
About 3900 prisoners are held at Abu Ghraib, Iraq's largest prison and notorious under Saddam Hussein for torture, abuse, and executions. The vast majority were arrested for "anti-coalition activities".
They are mostly held in outdoor encampments, razor-wire zones measuring about 300 yards by 300 yards containing around two dozen large tents, erected on hard mud. There is running water for the 400 or so prisoners housed in each of eight camps, Major Miller said.
Air-conditioning will be installed this month, as temperatures rise rapidly towards the worst of summer, when they can hit 120F, he said. Lookout towers stand throughout the complex and high-powered lamps ring the perimeter of the razor-wire pens.
Major Miller, who used to run the Guantanamo Bay "Camp X-ray" facility, took around 30 journalists to see a new medical wing built in the past three months, including a ward with 10 patients, most strapped to the beds by leather restraints on one arm and a leg.
He then showed off a collection of recently-constructed interrogation rooms, complete with one-way mirrors for secret monitoring, where detainees are questioned by military intelligence or other officials through a translator.
Colonel Foster Payne, head of the military intelligence brigade at Abu Ghraib, said his men used only standard interrogation methods and never resorted to violence or intimidation. He said he had had no reports of abuse on his watch.
Major Miller also took the group to see wing 1A and 1B, where the worst abuses are alleged to have taken place. The wing, comprising 103 tight, windowless cells, is now occupied by five women accused of anti-coalition activities.
WAVING a prosthetic leg over his head, one prisoner shouted: "Where's the freedom Bush? Is this freedom?"
Another read a message through a megaphone, protesting about the abuse of Iraqis' freedom, dignity, and rights.
The men were among hundreds of prisoners who clamoured to be heard yesterday as the US military took journalists to see Abu Ghraib prison, where American troops are accused of torturing and humiliating Iraqis.
Although desperate to limit the damage from a widening prisoner-abuse scandal, journalists were not allowed to film, photograph or talk to prisoners and their access was restricted to parts of the facility that US forces wanted to show them.
At least 10 of the prisoners were on crutches – apparently wounded in a recent mortar bombardment of the prison which killed 22 detainees.
Some of the inmates appeared to be in their early teens. Others were old and bearded and walked with the aid of sticks. One young man, who appeared to be blind, was escorted by a friend who desperately tried to point out his incapacity.
Major General Geoffrey Miller, brought in to run the jail after the dismissal of Brigadier General Janis Karpinski, who was in charge when the abuses are alleged to have taken place last year, said the ages of detainees ranged from 12 to 80.
About 3900 prisoners are held at Abu Ghraib, Iraq's largest prison and notorious under Saddam Hussein for torture, abuse, and executions. The vast majority were arrested for "anti-coalition activities".
They are mostly held in outdoor encampments, razor-wire zones measuring about 300 yards by 300 yards containing around two dozen large tents, erected on hard mud. There is running water for the 400 or so prisoners housed in each of eight camps, Major Miller said.
Air-conditioning will be installed this month, as temperatures rise rapidly towards the worst of summer, when they can hit 120F, he said. Lookout towers stand throughout the complex and high-powered lamps ring the perimeter of the razor-wire pens.
Major Miller, who used to run the Guantanamo Bay "Camp X-ray" facility, took around 30 journalists to see a new medical wing built in the past three months, including a ward with 10 patients, most strapped to the beds by leather restraints on one arm and a leg.
He then showed off a collection of recently-constructed interrogation rooms, complete with one-way mirrors for secret monitoring, where detainees are questioned by military intelligence or other officials through a translator.
Colonel Foster Payne, head of the military intelligence brigade at Abu Ghraib, said his men used only standard interrogation methods and never resorted to violence or intimidation. He said he had had no reports of abuse on his watch.
Major Miller also took the group to see wing 1A and 1B, where the worst abuses are alleged to have taken place. The wing, comprising 103 tight, windowless cells, is now occupied by five women accused of anti-coalition activities.
http://lists.econ.utah.edu/pipermail/a-list/2004-May/048622.html
==================================================

Rumsfeld in the hot seat on Iraq abuses
Wednesday, May 5, 2004 Posted: 11:00 PM EDT (0300 GMT)

Bush publicly voiced confidence in Rumsfeld despite the blunt private meeting.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld has become something a lightning rod over the way the Pentagon has handled reports that U.S. soldiers abused Iraqi detainees at Abu Ghraib prison near Baghdad.

President Bush told Rumsfeld on Wednesday that he was "not satisfied" at the way he received information about the allegations, a senior administration official told CNN, and members of Congress are complaining they were not informed of the investigation of the abuses.

At a private Oval Office meeting, Bush complained about learning of the existence of photographs showing Iraqi prisoners being humiliated and degraded from the media, the official said.

"He was not happy, and he let Secretary Rumsfeld know about it," the official said.

Bush also voiced concern that he was not kept up to speed on the scope of the problem -- and how the Pentagon was handling it, the official said.

The Army's investigation of the allegations found that soldiers at Abu Ghraib committed "egregious acts" and "grave breaches of international law."

Six soldiers have been criminally charged in the case and six others have been reprimanded, with two of those relieved of duty, Rumsfeld said at a Pentagon briefing Tuesday.

Investigators interviewed dozens of witnesses and looked at "numerous photos and videos portraying in graphic detail actual detainee abuse" taken by detention facility personnel at the prison. (Full story)

It was the CBS network's broadcast of those photos last week that set off the current controversy.

The question of when Rumsfeld told Bush of the allegations came up at the daily White House briefing Wednesday.

White House press secretary Scott McClellan said he did not know when Rumsfeld informed the president, but he pointed out that U.S. Central Command issued a news release on the investigation January 16.

"It was some time after Secretary Rumsfeld became aware of it," McClellan said, indicating the president was informed of the allegations in a general way, but he didn't learn of the severity of the abuses until last week.

The investigation was completed in mid-March, Gen. Peter Pace, vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said at the Pentagon briefing Tuesday. (Full story)

Rumsfeld goes before the Senate Armed Services Committee for two hours in an open hearing Friday to tell his side of the story. Afterward, he will appear before the full Senate in a closed hearing, said the panel's chairman, Republican Sen. John Warner of Virginia.

Rumsfeld will be accompanied by Gen. Richard Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and by a high-ranking official of the Department of the Army, Warner said.

"He's going to be grilled pretty good about what happened, how it happened, and how far up the chain it looks like it went," said Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss of Georgia, a committee member.

For his part, Rumsfeld says the Pentagon has done everything right.

"This is a serious problem, and it's something the department is addressing," he told the Pentagon briefing Tuesday. "The system works. The system works."

But at his meeting with Bush, Rumsfeld also made clear that he also felt "he didn't know some things he should have," according to the senior administration official, along with another official.

In appearances on two morning news shows Wednesday, Rumsfeld made no apologies for his handling of the scandal, and stopped short of issuing a full apology to the Iraqi people.

"Any American who sees the photographs that we've seen has to feel apologetic to the Iraqi people who were abused," he said on ABC's "Good Morning America."

Rumsfeld is equally reserved in characterizing how the abuse reports might have damaged the chances for U.S. success in Iraq.

"It is clearly, you know, unhelpful in a fundamental way. It's harmful," he told the Tuesday briefing.

At least one senator, Joseph Biden of Delaware, the ranking Democrat on the Foreign Relations Committee, has suggested that if Congress doesn't get satisfactory answers from senior Pentagon officials, "resignations should be sought" -- including Rumsfeld's.

"You know there's this tradition in the United States Navy that if a captain of a ship goes up on the shoals, almost regardless of whether it's his fault or not, he loses command," Biden said Wednesday on CNN. Rumsfeld is a former Navy pilot.

http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/05/05/iraq.abuse.rumsfeld/ 

================================================

Report singles out leaders of LI MP unit

Excerpt

http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/world/ny-usbrig0506,0,2008875.story?coll=ny-worldnews-headlines

Trouble at the top

Regarding Abu Ghraib, Karpinski has said in media interviews that she did not know of the abuses at the time, and blamed military interrogators for the abuses, saying they encouraged military police under her command to humiliate the prisoners as a way to break them down before questioning.

The 800th Military Police Brigade is based at Uniondale, where a roughly 120-member headquarters and headquarters company unit is based, headed by Karpinski. Karpinski lives in South Carolina and took over the 800th last June, joining the unit when it was already in Iraq.

The report suggests that Karpinski's management failures extended to her own senior staff, the top members of the 800th Brigade command team.

"Numerous witnesses" said a senior personnel official, Maj. David Hinzman, and a senior supply officer, identified only as "Maj. Green" were "essentially dysfunctional" but that Karpinski did not replace them despite repeated complaints, according to the report.

In addition, the Brigade Command Judge Advocate, Lt. Col. James O'Hare, "appears to lack initiative and was unwilling to accept responsibility for any of his actions," the report states. O'Hare, speaking from his Staten Island home, declined to comment on what the report said about him, but said, "I was very upset at what happened, what the soldiers did. It's not consistent with Army values."

Taguba also singles out Lt. Col. Gary Maddocks, the Brigade's executive officer, saying he "did not properly supervise the Brigade staff by failing to lay out staff priorities, take overt corrective action when needed and supervise their daily functions."

Maddocks and Hinzman could not be reached for comment. Army Reserve officials said they could not help a reporter contact them because the Reserve is not allowed to comment on the Taguba report -- in fact, one spokesman said his superiors have told him and others not to read the report, even though it is widely available on the Internet, because it remains classified.

Taguba's report also criticizes the 310th MP Battalion for allowing prison escapes on three occasions in January from a detention facility called Camp Bucca in southern Iraq.

Explaining an alleged escape early Jan. 7, the report cited "inexperienced guards, lapses in accountability, complacency, lack of leadership presence, poor visibility and lack of clear and concise communication between the guards and the leadership."

On Jan. 12, another seven prisoners escaped -- five were quickly apprehended -- due partly to "overcrowding and poor communications," the report said. Several prisoners also escaped Jan. 26.

http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/world/ny-usbrig0506,0,2008875.story?coll=ny-worldnews-headlines
=========================================

Soldiers in Iraqi Abuse Case Are Scapegoats: Wife

Agencies, Arab News

WASHINGTON, 5 May 2004 — US soldiers accused of abusing Iraqi prisoners were following orders and are being used as scapegoats to protect their superiors, the wife of one of the soldiers and the lawyer for another said yesterday.

Martha Frederick defended her husband, a soldier who faces prosecution for the abuse of Iraqis at the Abu Gharib prison near Baghdad.

“He was told to do these things and when he did them he thought that he was doing them in the sense of national security,” Frederick said.

The US military has brought charges of assault, cruelty and maltreatment against six soldiers, members of a military police battalion. It has also reprimanded six officers in connection with abuses at the Abu Gharib prison after photographs were broadcast around the world showing naked Iraqi prisoners stacked in a pyramid or positioned to simulate sex acts.

In e-mails to his wife, Staff Sgt. Ivan Frederick questioned some of the abuses he witnessed, such as leaving inmates naked in their cells or making them wear female underwear and handcuffing them to the doors of their cells.

“He questioned it from my understanding and he even tried to come up with some rules knowing that pretty much this was something he did not normally do,” said his wife in an interview on NBC’s “Today” show.

She complained her husband was being thrust into the limelight while others were protected. “Those who are responsible are standing behind the curtain and watching him take the fall for it. It’s almost like being a pawn in a chess game,” she said.

Houston lawyer Guy Womack, who is representing reservist Charles Graner in the abuse case, said his client should not be court-martialed and that pictures taken of him abusing Iraqi prisoners were staged.

“You court-martial the right person. You don’t court-martial the soldier who is following orders. He was under the command and the direction of intelligence officers, both military and civilian,” Womack told NBC’s “Today” show.

Graner, who was a corrections officer at a North Carolina prison, was on duty in Iraq for a military police unit.

Womack said the pictures were staged and part of the psychological manipulation of prisoners, adding that his client was told to smile for the camera along with a female soldier who was pointing at a prisoner’s genitals.

“These pictures themselves are abhorrent, but you have to put them in context,” Womack said.

Reserve Brig. Gen. Janis Karpinski, who oversaw prison facilities in Iraq, said she took responsibility for some of what had happened but pointed out military intelligence was in charge of interrogations — not the military police under her command.

Her lawyer, Neal Puckett, told CNN, “What’s clear in all of this and what’s apparently yet to be investigated is that the military intelligence personnel were the folks that had complete, exclusive control over what went on in the interrogation rooms.”

Congress Should Condemn Abuse

The US Senate’s top Democrat yesterday said Congress should condemn the “appalling” alleged abuse of Iraqi prisoners by US troops, and called on Pentagon top brass to provide a full accounting of events.

Tom Daschle, Senate Minority Leader, expressed “grave concern” about “the extraordinary impact the scandal has had our efforts to succeed” in Iraq.

Daschle called on Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to come to Congress to brief lawmakers on the matter.

“I would hope no later than the end of this week, the secretary could come to the Senate...and explain to us what they know (about) what happened, and what is going to be done about it,” he said.
http://www.aljazeerah.info/News%20archives/2004%20News%20archives/May/5%20n/Soldiers%20in%20Iraqi%20Abuse%20Case%20Are%20Scapegoats%20Wife.htm

======================================

 "PA" NEWS
Thu 6 May 2004
12:16am (UK)
Rumsfeld Faces Senate Grilling as Prisoner Death Probes Reach 14
Excerpt:
Tomorrow, Rumsfeld will testify to the Senate Armed Services Committee, whose chairman, John Warner, a Virginia Republican, said he had confidence in the secretary. But some Democrats seemed less sure.
Senator Joseph Biden, a Delaware Democrat, said that if adequate answers to questions about the abuse of prisoners were not forthcoming, then top officials, including Rumsfeld, should step down.
“If it goes all the way to Rumsfeld, then he should resign,” Biden told NBC’s Today programme. “Who is in charge?”
Coupled with the Iraq war’s mounting death toll – it rose to 758 US troops yesterday, according to the Pentagon’s count – and rising financial costs of the war, the prisoner abuse story has become a major political burden for the White House during an election year.
http://news.scotsman.com/latest.cfm?id=2884617

============================================

Will Rumsfeld survive abuse scandal?
Congress doesn't have a lot of goodwill left for defense chief

May 6, 2004, WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld’s job security was the hot topic in Washington on Thursday as he prepared to undergo a grilling by the Senate Armed Services Committee on Friday.

In past presidencies, defense secretaries have survived worse catastrophes than the abuse scandal at the Abu Ghraib prison, but with the presidential election only six months away, President Bush and his strategists are faced with the calculation of how much damage Rumsfeld has done to the president’s Iraq strategy and to his chances of winning a second term.

To be sure, the urgent idea of the moment — firing Rumsfeld — is less of a headline-making slogan for the Democrats precisely because some of them, including presidential hopeful John Kerry, have been calling for his dismissal for months.

Last September, Kerry said Rumsfeld was handling Iraq "in an arrogant, inappropriate way that has frankly put America at jeopardy."

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi called Thursday for Rumsfeld to quit.

And Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., often cited in news media reports as evidence that “even Republicans are criticizing the administration,” has long quarreled with Rumsfeld in public hearings of the Armed Services Committee and not bothered to conceal his contempt for the defense secretary.

Rumsfeld’s reservoir of goodwill on Capitol Hill is close to empty, especially because he has angered members who argue that he did not send enough troops to Iraq last year to accomplish the mission.

A key barometer of support for Rumsfeld and Bush's Iraq policy is the sentiment among hawkish House Democrats who represent the blue-collar and rural districts where many military enlisted personnel come from.

Murtha voices anger
The point man for such Democrats, Rep. John Murtha of Pennsylvania, an ex-Marine who won a Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts in the Vietnam War, denounced the Pentagon leadership in a press conference Thursday with Pelosi standing at his side.

“Today our forces in Iraq are undermanned, under-resourced, inadequately trained, and poorly supervised. There is a lack of leadership stemming from the very top,” Murtha said. Former Army chief of Staff Eric Shinseki "said you need 200,000 people” to pacify Iraq, Murtha noted, and Rumsfeld ignored his advice, which Murtha said turned out to have been correct.

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“This (Abu Ghraib) prison did not have enough people,” Murtha said. “How many other installations are undermanned? How many people are sent over there without the proper training to do the job they’re doing?”

Referring to the photos from Abu Ghraib, Murtha said, “We’re not going to recover from this damage. ... This one incident destroyed our credibility in Iraq and in all the Arab world.”

He added, “We cannot prevail in this war as the policy is going today. We either have to mobilize or we have to get out. ... The direction has got to be changed or it’s unwinnable.”

It was a thorough and damning indictment of Rumsfeld.

No call to resign
Despite his podium-pounding anger, Murtha, oddly enough, did not demand Rumsfeld’s resignation.

“I’m not willing at this point to say he ought to go,” Murtha told reporters, noting that since becoming Secretary of Defense, Rumsfeld has often called him to ask for advice. “Up until this point, he’s briefed me almost every week,” Murtha noted.

• Finger-pointing at Rumsfeld
May 5: The Pentagon’s handling of the abuse scandal created outrage on Capitol Hill, with much of the anger directed at Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. NBC’s Jim Miklaszewski reports.

For now, many members of Congress are biding their time, emphasizing that it is always up to a president to do his own hiring and firing.

For their part, Bush aides spread the word that the ice on which Rumsfeld is skating has grown perilously thin.

An anonymous “senior White House official” told the Washington Post that Bush had privately admonished Rumsfeld on Wednesday.

The unnamed official told the Post that Bush was "not happy" with the belated way Rumsfeld told him about the Abu Ghraib investigation.

Similar situations
After the worst military catastrophe in American history up to that point, the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, President Roosevelt did not fire Secretary of War Henry Stimson, and for good reason: Stimson, who’d served as Secretary of State and Secretary of War in earlier Republican administrations, gave bipartisan weight and credibility to FDR’s war effort.

But after the “Black Hawk Down” incident in Somalia in 1993, President Bill Clinton’s Defense Secretary Les Aspin was forced to step down because he'd lost Clinton’s support.

It’s not yet clear whether Rumsfeld is a Stimson or an Aspin.

Kerry, the man who could benefit from the dire events in Iraq, moved very cautiously Wednesday, saying only that “if I were president, we'd have a very different set of activities going on in Iraq today.”

With American troops in the field under fire, there is no majority in Congress that would choose the most dramatic way to cast a vote of “no confidence” in the Bush-Rumsfeld Iraq policy: a vote to cut off funds for Iraq operations as of a certain date.

Kerry has not taken a position on the additional $25 billion that Bush is seeking for operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Murtha said he will continue to vote to fund operations in Iraq. “Absolutely,” he said. “I’m going to support the troops. That’s my history. I’m going to do everything I can to help the troops.”

He sounded decidedly pessimistic, however, about what will play out over the next several months in Iraq, Rumsfeld or no Rumsfeld.

“It would be a devastating international blow to us if we were to get out (of Iraq), but I don’t know (if) we have the will to mobilize now that the public has turned against it,” Murtha said.

2004 MSNBC Interactive
http://msnbc.msn.com/id/4916525/

==================================================

(Excerpt) -

The Geneva Convention:

Article 17

No physical or mental torture, nor any other form of coercion, may be inflicted on prisoners of war to secure from them information of any kind whatever. Prisoners of war who refuse to answer may not be threatened, insulted, or exposed to any unpleasant or disadvantageous treatment of any kind.

Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/prisoners.htm

CBSNEWS.COM VIDEOS:  http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/04/27/60II/main614063.shtml

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