Doctor who exposed Blair found murdered
The Death of Dr. David Kelly

 

David Kelly's Death

Mystery of the helicopter that landed at scene of Dr Kelly's death after his body was found
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1386967/Mystery-helicopter-landed-scene-Dr-Kellys-death-body-found.html#ixzz1MJBt6sB8

 

Slideshow Slideshow: Weapons Expert Found Dead in Britain
Death deals devastating blow to Iraq arms hunt

Martin Bright
Sunday July 20, 2003
The Observer


David Kelly was about to lead the British hunt for weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and had contacted former UN inspectors as recently as two weeks ago to sound them out about a new mission.

He was acting as the senior British scientific adviser to the Iraq Survey Group, the body set up by the US Government at the end of May to replace the United Nations weapons inspection regime.

One former UN inspector, who worked with Kelly on two missions to Iraq in the Nineties, said he had received an email from the scientist two weeks ago asking him join the survey group mission. Kelly was working directly under Brigadier John Deverell, the British second in command of the survey group.

The unit was set up in May and is led by Major-General Keith Dayton, director of operations for the US Defence Intelligence Agency. With offices in Iraq, near Baghdad airport, and a logistics base in Qatar, the survey group has a staff of around 1,400 people drawn from the US, Britain and Australia.

Former inspectors said the death of the British Government's most senior chemical and biological weapons scientist would be a devastating blow to the survey group.

'Everybody very much deferred to him. Other experts turned to him, he was a leader and people always listened when he spoke,' one former inspector who had worked with Kelly said.

The news that Kelly was to play a central role in the coalition's search for WMD will provoke further questions about the Ministry of Defence's decision to identify him and place him at the centre of a row between Downing Street and the BBC.

His prominence also contradicts briefings from the MoD that the man they believed to be the source of BBC reports that the Government had 'sexed up' its claims about Saddam Hussein's arsenal was a junior figure.

The survey group has already seized thousands of documents, computer records and reports that are believed to have informed the Government's view that some evidence of WMD programmes would be found, if not the weapons themselves.

His death was described as a devastating blow to the search for WMDs by colleagues who had worked with him in Iraq. 'All his knowledge died with him,' a former soldier who worked with him in Iraq said.

A UN nuclear inspector said Kelly was present when he was debriefed by the intelligence services on his return from Iraq. 'He was the boffin who used to sit in the background and ask questions. He was very senior on the weapons team in the Nineties and was very trusted by the MoD.'

Colleagues said they were appalled that such a senior and respected scientist has been treated so disrespectfully by the Foreign Affairs Select Committee. 'I found that particularly unpleasant,' one said.

'It was nasty and unprofessional. The people who were doing the interrogation were not fit to sharpen his pencils.'

The work of hunting for weapons of mass destruction after the war was originally carried out by the 75th Exploitation Task Force of the US army.

Despite international demands for the job to be passed to the UN the allies set up the survey group with the aim of combining the work of US, British and Australian intelligence under one roof.

Although the US Government refused to allow the post-war inspections to be run under UN auspices, most of the senior staff are former UN weapons inspectors with many years of experience searching for Saddam's weapons of mass destruction.
http://observer.guardian.co.uk/iraq/story/0,12239,1001793,00.html

======================================================

CHERDAV
Doctor who exposed Blair found murdered
Fri Jul 18 13:29:18 2003
208.152.73.146

-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Doctor who exposed Blair found murdered
Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2003 08:53:47 EDT
From: CHERDAV44@aol.com
To: apfn@apfn.org

British Doctor who Told BBC that Blair had Doctored Iraq Dossier
Has Apparently Been Found Murdered

British authorities say they believe a body found this morning in Oxfordshire is that of
Dr. David Kelly, a WMD expert who broke the story of how the Blair dossier on Iraq had
been doctored. How convenient for this apparent murder to have occurred during the very
48 hour period that Tony Blair is well removed from the scene of the crime, eh?

The British government is already defending itself: "The ministry said Dr Kelly had at
no point been threatened with suspension or dismissal for speaking to Mr Gilligan,"
reports the BBC, "'It was made clear to him that he had broken civil service rules by
having unauthorised contact with a journalist, but "that was the end of it", said a
spokesman." Or...was it the end of Dr. Kelly?


Body 'matches' Iraq expert
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/3076801.stm

A body matching the description of Dr David Kelly - the weapons expert at the centre of the Iraq dossier row - has been found at a beauty spot close to his home in Oxfordshire.

The government says an independent judicial inquiry will be held into the circumstances of his death if the body is confirmed to be that of the MoD adviser.

The discovery was made at 0920 BST by a member of the police team searching for Dr Kelly in a wooded area at Harrowdown Hill, near Faringdon.

Dr Kelly, 59, had been caught up in a row between the BBC and the government about the use of intelligence reports in the run-up to the war with Iraq.

On Tuesday he told the Foreign Affairs select committee he had spoken to BBC reporter Andrew Gilligan but denied he was the main source for a story about claims that a dossier on Iraq had been "sexed up".

Dr Kelly left his home in Southmoor, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, at about 1500 BST on Thursday and his family reported him missing at 2345 BST the same day.

The body was found lying on the ground, around five miles from Dr Kelly's home, a police spokeswoman said.

Acting superintendent Dave Purnell said formal identification would take place on Saturday and the case was being treated as an "unexplained death".

"We will be awaiting the results of the post mortem and also waiting while the forensic examination continues at the scene at Harrowdown Hill," he added.

Attention

The government announcement of an inquiry if the body is Dr Kelly's came from the prime minister's plane as he flew for a visit to Tokyo.


"He is not used to the media glare, he is not used to the intense spotlight he has been put under"

Mr Blair's spokesman said: "The prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family.

"If it is Dr Kelly's body, the Ministry of Defence will hold an independent judicial inquiry into the circumstances leading up to his death."

Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said Mr Blair should consider cutting short his trip to the Far East.

Robert Jackson, the Conservative MP in whose constituency Dr Kelly lived, said the "responsibility of the BBC should not go unmentioned" in the case.

"The pressure was significantly increased by the fact the BBC refused to make it clear he was not the source," he said.

A BBC spokesman said: "We are shocked and saddened to hear what has happened and we extend our deepest sympathies to Dr Kelly's family and friends.

Shock

"Whilst Dr Kelly's family await the formal identification, it would not be appropriate for us to make any further statement."

Earlier this week, Dr Kelly denied being the BBC's main source for the story claiming Downing Street had "sexed up" the dossier about Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.

MPs on the Commons foreign affairs committee, which questioned Dr Kelly earlier this week, reacted with shock and disbelief at news of his disappearance.

Huge media attention has been on Dr Kelly since the Ministry of Defence said he had come forward to admit meeting Andrew Gilligan, the BBC correspondent behind the controversial Iraq story.

Mr Gilligan said a source had told him that the dossier on Iraq had been "transformed" by Downing Street.

The BBC correspondent has refused to name his source, but the MoD said Dr Kelly had come forward to say it may have been him.

Sensitive

Government ministers have said they believe he was the source for Mr Gilligan's story.

Supt Purnell said a police family liaison officer is with Dr Kelly's family. The official and wife Janice have three daughters, Sian, 32, and twins Rachel and Ellen, 30.

Ann Lewis, a neighbour of Dr Kelly, told BBC News Online she was "devastated" for his family, especially his children.

She said: "He was a quiet man. He was a man who showed great care and concern for others."

Craig Foster, 36, landlord of the Blue Boar public house in nearby Longworth, said Dr Kelly was "a very well liked gentleman".

Police say Dr Kelly is an avid walker and has good local knowledge of the many footpaths surrounding his home.

A Ministry of Defence spokeswoman said: "We are aware that Dr David Kelly has gone missing and we are obviously concerned."

Rules

The ministry said Dr Kelly had at no point been threatened with suspension or dismissal for speaking to Mr Gilligan.

It was made clear to him that he had broken civil service rules by having unauthorised contact with a journalist, but "that was the end of it", said a spokesman.

There must be more to this than we had thought. I do not know what that means, I just think there is
John Maples
Foreign affairs committee

Profile: Dr David Kelly
Downing Street says "normal personnel procedures" were followed after Dr Kelly volunteered that he might have been the source of Mr Gilligan's report.

It was made clear to Dr Kelly that his name was likely to become public knowledge because he was one of only a small number of people it could have been about, a spokesman said.

After questioning Dr Kelly earlier this week, the Commons foreign affairs select committee said it was "most unlikely" he was the main source for the BBC story.

And they said Dr Kelly, who has worked as a weapons inspector in Iraq, had been "poorly treated" by the government - a charge strongly rejected by the MoD.

Committee chairman Donald Anderson told the BBC his "heart went out" to Dr Kelly's family as the search for the official went on.

Another member of the committee, Tory John Maples said he was "speechless" after hearing of the discovery of a body.

"If it is (Dr Kelly), it is just awful. What can you say? Nothing," he said.

"There must be more to this than we had thought. I do not know what that means, I just think there is."

Tory MP Richard Ottaway, another committee member, said: "He is not used to the media glare, he is not used to the intense spotlight he has been put under."

The BBC has rejected Mr Anderson's claim that Mr Gilligan was an "unreliable witness" who had changed his story about the Iraq dossier claims when he met the committee in private on Thursday.

=======================
The BBC's Helen Simms
"His wife is reported to have said he was extremely angry about recent events"
watch:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/media/video/39295000/rm/_39295033_kelly16_simms_vi.ram

MoD expert 'unused to spotlight'
A profile of Iraq weapons expert Dr David Kelly.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3076869.stm

BBC NEWS UPDATES:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/

APFN
Body found in wood matches UK weapons inspector
Fri Jul 18 12:56:29 2003
208.152.73.146

Body found in wood matches UK weapons inspector
By Gideon Long
http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/reuters07-18-072017.asp?reg=MIDEAST

LONGWORTH, England, July 18 — British police found a body on Friday matching that of a mild-mannered scientist who disappeared after becoming unwittingly embroiled in a furious political dispute about the Iraq war.

The softly spoken 59-year-old had been thrust into the limelight by a row over whether the British government hyped the threat from Iraq in order to justify joining the U.S.-led war.
The political fallout was almost immediate. Prime Minister Tony Blair's government promised an independent judicial inquiry into events leading up to the death of Dr David Kelly, if it is confirmed.
Blair has refused previous calls for a wider inquiry into the government case for war in Iraq.
Kelly's family reported him missing overnight after he went for a walk in the Oxfordshire countryside on Thursday with no coat and stayed out despite a rainstorm. Police found a body in a wood near his home earlier on Friday.
''We can confirm that the body matches the description of Dr Kelly. The body has not been formally identified,'' a police spokeswoman said.
Kelly, a microbiologist at the Defence Ministry who had worked for U.N. inspectors in Iraq, had been grilled by parliamentarians on Tuesday after admitting he spoke to a reporter for Britain's BBC radio.
The reporter, Andrew Gilligan, said in May a senior intelligence source had told him the government ''sexed up'' data to emphasise the threat from Iraq.
That report sparked parliamentary hearings into how the government made the case for war, forced Blair onto the defensive and pitted government officials against the broadcaster in a heated war of words.
Blair spoke to top officials about the case from aboard a flight to Tokyo from Washington.
''The prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family of Dr Kelly,'' a spokesman said aboard the flight.
If the death is confirmed the defence ministry would hold an independent judicial inquiry, presided over by a judge with access to all government papers, he added.
Kelly's discomfort in the spotlight was evident from his demeanour at the foreign affairs committee hearing.
Speaking so softly he could barely be heard, he admitted he had met Gilligan but denied telling him Blair's communications chief Alastair Campbell had ordered intelligence on suspected Iraqi banned weapons to be hyped.
Kelly appeared shell-shocked when parliamentarians at the hearing described him as ''chaff'' and a government ''fall guy,'' put forward to shield top officials from blame.
Kelly's wife Jane described him as deeply upset by the hearing, family friend Tom Mangold, a television journalist, told ITV News.
''She told me he had been under considerable stress, that he was very very angry about what had happened at the committee..,'' Mangold said.
Copyright 2003 Reuters Limited. All rights reserved. Republication or redistribution of Reuters content is expressly prohibited without the prior written consent of Reuters.
----------------------------------------------------------
Body Found in Hunt for U.K. Expert in Iraqi Arms Row (Update7)
http://quote.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000102&sid=ax7JO_mmxKEY&refer=uk

uly 18 (Bloomberg) -- A body has been found today during a hunt for a missing armaments expert named by the U.K.'s Ministry of Defense as a possible source for a report that a dossier on Iraq's weapons of mass destruction was ``sexed up,'' police said.

A police helicopter was dispatched to help search for David Kelly, who failed to return to his home in Southmoor, Oxfordshire, northwest of London, yesterday, Thames Valley Police said.

The body of a man matching Kelly's description was found face down in a wooded area near his home at 9:20 a.m. London time, police said. ``The body matches the description in terms of height, age, hair color, that sort of thing,'' police spokeswoman Kate Smith said. The body will be formally identified tomorrow, police said. No information was available on the cause of death.

Kelly, 59, a U.K. government weapons adviser, said he met a BBC journalist a week before a government dossier was published that said Iraq was capable of firing weapons of mass destruction with 45 minutes' notice and was a threat to other countries. He denied he told the journalist there was concern in intelligence circles that the dossier exaggerated Iraq's weapons capability.

Judicial Inquiry

If it is determined that the body is Kelly's, there will be a full, independent judicial inquiry into his death, Godric Smith, a spokesman for Prime Minister Tony Blair, told reporters traveling with him to Tokyo today for the start of an Asian tour. Blair was informed of the body's discovery during the flight.

``This is very distressing news,'' Smith said. ``People should not jump to conclusions.''

If there is an inquiry, Downing Street will cooperate fully by providing materials and witnesses, he said. From the plane, Blair spoke with government defense and legal officials in London about Kelly's disappearance, Smith said.

``The prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family,'' Smith said.

A BBC report on the alleged ``sexing up'' of the dossier caused a rift with the government that has dominated the domestic media agenda. There have been calls by legislators for Blair to resign for ``misleading parliament'' over the reasons for going to war with Iraq. No weapons of mass destruction have been found in Iraq since a U.S.-led coalition invaded it in March.

The prime minister's Asian tour follows his stopover in Washington yesterday, where he received 17 standing ovations by U.S. lawmakers during a speech in which he defended his support for the war against Iraq.

Publicly Questioned

Kelly was publicly questioned Tuesday over the row by a House of Commons committee. He said he didn't believe he was the main source for the BBC story. He also said he didn't think the intelligence services were unhappy with the dossier.

The BBC has refused to say whether it relied solely on Kelly for the information.

Kelly is a microbiologist and former senior United Nations weapons inspector. He visited Iraq on 37 occasions. Kelly went for a walk at 3 p.m. London time yesterday without wearing a coat on a stormy day. His family called police when he had failed to return home by 11:45 p.m. London time, police said.

The BBC report on the allegations surrounding the government dossier was compiled by journalist Andrew Gilligan.

Donald Anderson, chairman of the Foreign Affairs Select Committee that questioned Kelly, said the weapons adviser had been ``poorly treated'' by the Ministry of Defense since telling officials he had met Gilligan. The Ministry of Defense has challenged that accusation.

``He seemed pretty composed,'' Anderson said of Kelly's appearance before the committee. ``I don't feel the grilling was particularly aggressive.''

Some members of parliament have said Kelly was the ``fall guy'' in an episode that was embarrassing for the government.

Pressure

``He did give a hint of the pressure he was under when he said he was unable to get to his house at the moment because of the media intrusion,'' the BBC cited Richard Ottaway, an opposition Conservative member of parliament, as saying. ``He is not used to the media glare. He is not used to the intense spotlight he has been under.''

Ottaway called for an inquiry ``at the highest level'' into the treatment of Kelly. His demand was echoed by Peter Kilfoyle, a member of Blair's Labour Party.

``Dr. Kelly was a reluctant witness,'' said Labour lawmaker Eric Illsley, member of the committee. ``He obviously didn't want to be in the public spotlight.''

Blair Aide Cleared

The Foreign Affairs Select Committee cleared the government's director of communications, Alastair Campbell, of ``sexing up'' the dossier. It said the ``jury was still out'' over case for war in Iraq. Anderson said it was ``most unlikely'' that Kelly was Gilligan's source.

Smith declined to say whether Blair spoke with Campbell after word reached Blair's plane about Kelly's disappearance. Campbell flew back to London from Washington after Blair's visit.

Blair's Downing Street office said Kelly had volunteered the fact that he had met Gilligan and as a result may have been thought of as the source of the information in the BBC report. It was made clear to him his name would be put in the public domain, a U.K. official said.

Kelly had said he ``deeply, deeply disliked'' what had happened to him, and his wife said he was angry about it, the BBC's political editor, Andrew Marr, reported.
Last Updated: July 18, 2003 10:31 EDT

Guardian UK
Timeline: Dr David Kelly
Sat Jul 19 04:26:12 2003
208.152.73.91

Timeline: Dr David Kelly
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000991,00.html

Friday July 18, 2003

July 8
At 5.55pm the government issues a statement saying a Ministry of Defence official has come forward and admitted meeting BBC defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan on May 22. The official said he met Gilligan, whom he had known for "some months", at a central London hotel, and that he had been asked about weapons of mass destruction and Alastair Campbell.

"He says that when Mr Gilligan asked about the role of Alastair Campbell with regard to the 45 minute issue, he made no comment and explained that he was not involved in the process of drawing up the intelligence parts of the dossier," the statement said.

"He made no other comment about Mr Campbell. When Mr Gilligan asked him why the 45 minute point was in the dossier, he says he commented that it was 'probably for impact'. He says he did not see the 45 minute intelligence report on which it was based."

The government says the official is not one of the senior officials involved in drawing up the September dossier, but an expert who has advised ministers on weapons of mass destruction.

The BBC responds, saying the description issued by the government does not match Gilligan's source in important ways - "Mr Gilligan's source does not work in the Ministry of Defence and he has known the source for a number of years, not months," the BBC says in a statement.

July 9
Geoff Hoon, the defence secretary, writes to BBC chairman Gavyn Davies asking him to confirm or deny whether Dr David Kelly, a renowned microbiologist and advisor to the Ministry of Defence, was the original source of Gilligan's story. The BBC steadfastly refuses to reveal any information about its source, saying it will not be drawn into a trap.

Tony Blair's spokesman says the approach is "not an assault on journalistic sources, this is not an assault on the BBC, it is not a vendetta". He insists it is a "genuine attempt to get at the truth behind what is one of the most serious allegations you can make against a government".

The BBC responds by saying the story has descended into farce. "The MoD has lost all credibility on this issue. It completely changed its story overnight for spurious reasons, and we intend to draw a line under the matter. We are not going to discuss our source," the corporation says in a statement.

The MoD issues a statement saying it has named the official who has come forward in a letter to the BBC, but not naming the source. However, by the end of the day some lobby journalists have mysteriously learnt of his identity.

When the Times political reporting team contacts the MoD and put Dr Kelly's name to the department, his name is confirmed. By 11.40pm he has been named as Gilligan's source on the Press Association newswire.

Downing Street categorically denies being the source of the leak. In its report on July 10, the Times says Downing Street is "99% convinced" that Dr Kelly is Gilligan's source.

July 15
Dr Kelly is called to give evidence before the foreign affairs select committee. Asked by MPs whether he thinks he is the main source for Gilligan's story he says: "No." He admits meeting Gilligan on three occasions since September 2002, including a meeting on May 22 at the Charing Cross hotel in central London.

Dr Kelly says that while certain aspects of Gilligan's report tallied with their conversation, his account of Campbell's intervention in the September dossier was not "a factual record of my interaction with him". "From the conversations I had with him, I don't know how he could have had the authority to make the statements he is making," Dr Kelly told the committee.

He also admits meeting with Newsnight science correspondent Susan Watts after a talk he had given on November 5 last year, and to speaking to her in several telephone conversations subsequently.

MPs on the committee back Dr Kelly's denial, issuing a statement saying he was "most unlikely" to have been the source behind the "sexed up" dossier claim and criticising the government's treatment of him. The committee says Dr Kelly has been "poorly treated" by the defence minister, and Labour member Andrew Mackinlay says he had been used as a "fall guy".

Donald Anderson, the chairman of the committee, writes to foreign secretary Jack Straw demanding an apology for the way Dr Kelly was treated.

July 16
Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith calls on Tony Blair to apologise for the treatment of Dr Kelly. Speaking at prime minister's questions, Mr Blair refuses to apologise and once again calls on the BBC to name Gilligan's source.

"The Ministry of Defence made it clear that of course they don't know who the source is. There's only one body that does - the BBC. All they have to do is say yes or no - why don't they?" asks the prime minister.

July 17
At 3pm Dr Kelly leaves his home at Southmoor, near Abingdon in Oxfordshire, telling his wife he is going for a walk. Although he is accustomed to walking for several hours at a time in the footpaths near his home, he is dressed inappropriately for the wet weather, wearing only a shirt and not taking a coat with him. When he fails to return home by 11.45pm, his family contacts the police.

July 18
Dr Kelly is reported missing by Thames Valley Police. Around 9.20am, police find the body of a male at Harrowdown Hill near to Dr Kelly's home. There are no other reported missing persons in the area, and Dr Kelly is known to have enjoyed walking near the hill, about 45 minutes to an hour from his home.


18.07.2003: Timeline: the Gilligan affair
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,994896,00.html

 



Related articles
18.07.2003: Body found in search for MoD 'mole'
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000903,00.html

Body found in search for MoD 'mole'

Chris Tryhorn
Friday July 18, 2003


 

Kelly: Police are searching for missing scientist.
 

Police searching for David Kelly, the alleged mole at the centre of the Iraq dossier row, have found the body of a man.

The team of police looking for Dr Kelly throughout the night found a body at 9.20am, nearly 10 hours after Dr Kelly's wife raised the alarm that he was missing.

The body was found on Harrowdown Hill, near Dr Kelly's home at Southmoor in Oxfordshire.

Police said inquiries were continuing at the scene, and could not give any further details about the body.

"The identification of the person has not been established," a police spokesman said.

"The body is a male. We have not ruled anything out. Inquiries are ongoing, people are at the scene now.

"This is a very early stage in the inquiry and we are waiting for further information to be made available."

The spokesman said Dr Kelly's family had been kept abreast of what the police had been doing in relation to the civil servant's disappearance yesterday.

He called for news reporters not to contact the Kelly family and to treat them with respect during what is a "sensitive inquiry".

Dr Kelly went out for a walk yesterday afternoon and has not been seen since.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857

 


18.07.2003: 'BBC mole' reported missing
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000932,00.html

'BBC mole' reported missing

Ciar Byrne
Friday July 18, 2003


David Kelly, the government adviser named as the possible source for the BBC's report claiming the government "sexed up" a key intelligence dossier on Iraq, has been reported missing by his family.

The 59-year-old went missing from his home in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, at 3pm yesterday afternoon after telling his wife he was going for a walk, according to Thames Valley Police.

His family contacted police when he had failed to return by 11.45pm yesterday, four days after he gave evidence to a parliamentary inquiry into the affair.

"We have launched a major search operation. We are very concerned for his wellbeing and are searching all the possible areas where he may be. His family have said this is completely out of character," a spokeswoman for Thames Valley Police told Sky News.

Dr Kelly, who volunteered to give evidence to the foreign affairs select committee, admitted to MPs last week he had met the BBC defence correspondent, Andrew Gilligan, on three occasions since September 2002.

With two defence ministry police sitting behind him, Dr Kelly confirmed he met Gilligan in a central London hotel on the same day that the reporter said he met his sole source at a central London hotel.

But Dr Kelly said he did not believe he could be the primary source of the report at the centre of a bitter row between the BBC and No 10.

"I believe I am not the main source. From the conversation I had with him I don't see how he could make the authoritative statements he was making from the comments that I made," Dr Kelly said.

Committee members were critical of the government's handling of Dr Kelly, saying he had been the "fall guy" and had been "poorly treated" by the defence minister.

However, the Ministry of Defence has stood by its claims that Dr Kelly was the sole source of the story, pointing to Gilligan's evidence that he had relied on one source and that three other sources mentioned had not discussed the September dossier or had done so only later.

Dr Kelly has been under enormous pressure since he admitted making contact with Gilligan.

He was officially reprimanded for having an "unauthorised" meeting with a journalist, and recently complained that his home was surrounded by journalists.

The chairman of the foreign affairs committee, Donald Anderson, said he was "shocked" by the news of Dr Kelly's disappearance.

"When he appeared before the committee, yes, he was softly spoken, but he seemed to be pretty relaxed and the committee was not at all aggressive or hostile in our questioning of him," he told Sky News.

Dr Kelly was described by police as an avid walker with good local knowledge of the many footpaths surrounding his home, which is near the river Thames.

Police said it was not unusual for him to walk for two or three hours at a time, but unusual for him to do this alone.

Thames Valley Police has scheduled a news conference on Dr Kelly's disappearance for 10.30am this morning.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857



18.07.2003: Profile: Dr David Kelly
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000919,00.html

Profile: Dr David Kelly

Matthew Tempest, political correspondent
Friday July 18, 2003


It was on July 9 that Dr David Kelly - a former senior UN weapons inspector - broke into the public consciousness, named in the papers as someone who had had an "unauthorised" meeting with the BBC journalist Andrew Gilligan.

According to Dr Kelly's own evidence to the foreign affairs select committee this week he had informed his "line manager" at the MoD himself that he had met Mr Gilligan and could, therefore, at least be perceived to be the source of the Today programme's allegations that the government's dossier was "sexed up".

Dr Kelly, an adviser to the government and an expert in biological warfare, had previously worked at the Porton Down research centre.

A renowned microbiologist he was an adviser to the Foreign Office before moving to the MoD. He spent seven years as an Unscom inspector in the 1990s, visiting Iraq on 37 occasions.

Although he appeared tentative, quietly spoken but calm before MPs, it was in fact his second appearance before the FAC - he also gave evidence last September.

Dr Kelly's surprising identification by the MoD came about when the defence secretary, Geoff Hoon, wrote to the BBC chairman, Gavyn Davies, demanding to know whether the official who had come forward was the source of Gilligan's original story which sparked the row.

Mr Hoon gave Mr Davies Dr Kelly's name, asking the corporation to confirm or deny that it was the same person as Gilligan's source.

Tony Blair's spokesman insisted at the time its approach was "not an assault on journalistic sources, this is not an assault on the BBC, it is not a vendetta". He described it as a "genuine attempt to get at the truth behind what is one of the most serious allegations you can make against a government".

How Dr Kelly's identity came into the public domain is unclear.

In his session before the FAC, Dr Kelly was accompanied by two MoD "minders" who sat behind the scientist as he was questioned by the panel of MPs.

That questioning often became aggressive, with Labour MP Andrew Mackinlay, in particular, first assaulting him for refusing to say, without checking his diary, which other journalists he may have met in the month of May.

Later Mr Mackinlay changed tack, dubbing Dr Kelly "chaff" and a fall guy. At all times, Dr Kelly merely retorted that he "accepted the process" of both the MoD's operations, and the FAC inquiry, although, in a comment which received little attention at the time, he said he was unable to check his diary since he was unable to get to his house - presumably due to the media encamping outside.

In his evidence on Tuesday, he also admitted meeting Susan Watts of Newsnight, and having met Mr Gilligan on three occasions. He conceded that he may have met other journalists, none of which were authorised by the MoD, but that he had experience of dealing with journalists in the past.

However, it was unclear from his evidence whether or not he was the main source of Mr Gilligan's evidence. He denied it, although the dates, and some of the topics discussed, fitted Mr Gilligan's story.

Dr Kelly is a former UN weapons inspector and now advises British ministers on weapons of mass destruction an adviser in the proliferation and arms control secretariat.

He came from a background in agricultural science. He was chief science officer at Britain's natural environment research council institute of virology and the head of microbiology at the chemical defence establishment in Porton Down from 1984 to 1992.

Dr Kelly became senior adviser on biological warfare for the UN in Iraq in 1994, holding the post until 1999.

Between 1991 and 1998 he played a key role in inspecting Iraqi weapons after the Gulf war, once saying during a lecture: "When Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990, little did I realise that Saddam Hussein would dictate the next 10 years of my life."

He also led all the visits and inspections of Russian biological warfare facilities from 1991 to 1994 under the 1992 trilateral agreement between the US, UK and Russia.

In September last year he gave evidence to a Commons committee probing the war on terrorism. He was speaking in his role as chief scientific officer and senior adviser to the proliferation and arms control secretariat of the Ministry of Defence, and the non-proliferation department of the Foreign Office.

When he spoke to the foreign affairs committee this week, it was in very different circumstances - and under a much brighter media spotlight.


18.07.2003: MPs accuse Gilligan of changing story
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000678,00.html

MPs accuse Gilligan of changing story

Michael White, political editor
Friday July 18, 2003
The Guardian


MPs investigating the Iraqi weapons controversy last night accused the BBC reporter at the heart of the row of being an "unsatisfactory witness" who no longer claimed that Alastair Campbell had "sexed up" the key intelligence dossier.

Though the claim by the Labour-dominated Commons foreign affairs committee (FAC) was endorsed by a senior Conservative, it was angrily denied by the BBC, which accused the politicians of staging "an exceptionally aggressive and accusatory" ambush.

After interviewing defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan a second time for almost two hours behind closed doors, Labour and Conservative members of the FAC announced that it had been "an unsatisfactory session with an unsatisfactory witness".

The reporter, the MPs said, may have unfairly maligned the No 10 communications director by blaming him for the crucial insertion into the September dossier of a claim that Iraq could have weapons of mass destruction ready within 45 minutes.

"There is a grave danger of unfairness to Mr Campbell as a result," the MPs said after completing a brief formal report to the Commons.

Mr Gilligan immediately took to the airwaves to deny changing his story. "This was an ambush by a hanging jury with only one opposition member [Tory, Sir John Stanley] present for the relevant section of the meeting."

Mark Damazar, the BBC's deputy director of news, who attended the session as a non-participant observer, backed Mr Gilligan. "They started with and barely desisted from an unrelentingly hostile tone," he told the Guardian.

In public and in private the MPs remained equally emphatic and promised to publish the transcript of their evidence within a week.

"Mr Gilligan clearly changed his mind in the course of the evidence, in particular in relation to serious allegations concerning Mr Campbell," said the chairman, Labour's Donald Anderson.

"We just couldn't believe it. In the middle bit he was back-tracking," one Labour MP said later. Another claimed he was "increasingly unconvincing" and "came full circle in two hours". But Mr Damazar said that Mr Gilligan had denied - several times - that he was back-tracking during the cross-examination.

In a bizarre twist, the former Tory minister John Maples, who did not attend yesterday's FAC session, protested on Channel 4 that the meeting was held without proper notice and that he wanted to "dissociate" himself from it.

Mr Maples and Richard Ottaway, another Tory MP absent yesterday, had opposed the recall of Mr Gilligan in the wake of last week's evidence from weapons specialist Dr David Kelly, who defence officials believe was the prime source of the BBC story, though Gilligan and the BBC refuse to either confirm or deny it.

The BBC accused the MPs of bad faith, saying that they had failed to provide the corporation with copies of their own dossier of Mr Gilligan's work over many years and had also failed to provide prior notice of the hearing.

"The committee was determined to find fault with Mr Gilligan's story but did not succeed. Mr Gilligan defended his journalism with vigour, pointing out among other things that many of his source's allegations have now been corroborated by other evidence. We deeply resent the way the committee was used to attack Mr Gilligan's integrity," said a BBC statement.

MPs claimed that at one point Mr Gilligan had said he had tried to convince his source "to come forward and go public, but I failed". Did that mean Dr Kelly was not the source? Mr Gilligan did not answer. The FAC has decided that he could not be, though he did meet Mr Gilligan in a London hotel on May 22, the same day as the vital source.

The prime minister's official spokesman said: "The FAC's statement this evening underlines once again that all the questions are now for the BBC to answer.

"It should answer those questions rather than criticise a parliamentary committee for expressing a view it does not like.

"They are: 1. Do the BBC and its governors still stand by the story in the broadcast on May 29 which was repeated by its defence correspondent in the Mail on Sunday on June 1?

"2. Does the BBC still believe that the government, in particular Alastair Campbell, inserted the 45-minute intelligence into the September dossier against the wishes of the intelligence agencies, knowing it to be false?"



17.07.2003: BBC row with government deepens
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000346,00.html

BBC row with government deepens

Lisa O'Carroll
Thursday July 17, 2003


 

Gilligan: 'Absolutely' has backing of BBC bosses
 

A new and furious row has flared up between the BBC and the government today after Andrew Gilligan, the journalist who claimed Alastair Campbell "sexed up" intelligence on Iraq, was tonight accused of changing his story by MPs.

He was branded an "unsatisfactory witness" by the Commons foreign affairs select committee after giving evidence in a private session today that lasted for more than an hour and a half.

The BBC journalist was invited to give evidence for a second time following the appearance of David Kelly, the Ministry of Defence microbiologist who admitted having an unauthorised meeting with Gilligan before the controversial broadcast which contained the allegations about Mr Campbell.

But Gilligan hit back immediately, accusing the FAC of "deliberately misinterpreting" his evidence.

"I have not changed my story in any way," Mr Gilligan said.

He added: "This was an ambush by a hanging jury, with only one opposition member present for the relevant section of the meeting."

The committee's chairman, Donald Anderson, said: "Mr Gilligan clearly changed his mind in the course of the evidence, in particular in relation to serious allegations concerning Mr Campbell."

He said it was now up to the public to decide who they believed, once a transcript of a private session is made public within the next seven days.

But in an interview with Sky News at 7pm, Gilligan said it was he who had asked for the transcript to be published.

"I defended my journalism with vigour. ..I am really very shocked with the way in which this inquiry has been turned and diverted into the Alastair Campbell witch-hunt against me."

"The committee's inquiry is into whether the government gave accurate information in the run up the Iraq war. It is not into whether Andrew Gilligan's source was right or not, it wasn't into whether Andrew Gilligan is a good journalist or not," he told Sky News.

Asked whether he had full backing of his BBC bosses he said: "Absolutely".

The latest development is a setback for the BBC, which had been hoping to draw a line under the affair.

The corporation has consistently refused to confirm or deny whether Dr Kelly, the MoD scientist, was the single source that inspired the Gilligan story.

Following this afternoon's meeting, the BBC hit back furiously with a statement denying that Gilligan had changed his story in any way and accusing the committee of playing politics.

"Andrew Gilligan has not changed his story. The committee launched a series of personal attacks on Mr Gilligan in an atmosphere which was largely hostile.

"The committee was determined to find fault with Mr Gilligan's story, but did not succeed. Mr Gilligan defended his journalism with vigour, pointing out among other things that many of his source's allegations have now been corroborated by other evidence. We deeply resent the way the committee was used to attack Mr Gilligan's integrity."


16.07.2003: Tory leader attacks government 'deceit'
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,999303,00.html

Tory leader attacks government 'deceit'

Jason Deans
Wednesday July 16, 2003


 

Campbell: accused of waging a 'personal vendetta' against the BBC's Andrew Gilligan
 

Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith has accused Tony Blair and his communications chief Alastair Campbell of creating a "culture of deceit" with their handling of issues such as the Iraq dossier row with the BBC.

Mr Duncan Smith, speaking at the last prime minister's questions before parliament breaks for the summer, also accused Mr Campbell of conducting a "personal vendetta" against Andrew Gilligan, the BBC journalist whose Iraq dossier story is at the centre of the dispute.

"The prime minister and Alastair Campbell have created a culture of deceit at the heart of government," he said.

Mr Duncan Smith called for Mr Blair to apologise to Dr David Kelly, the Ministry of Defence consultant whom the government claimed may have been the source of Gilligan's story.

The Tory leader's demands follow a similar request by the Labour chairman of the foreign affairs select committee, Donald Anderson, last night.

Following Dr Kelly's appearance before the committee yesterday, Mr Anderson wrote to the foreign secretary, Jack Straw, demanding an apology for the way he was treated.

Dr Kelly told the committee he did not believe he was the story's main source, whom Gilligan has refused to name.

The committee agreed, later issuing a statement saying Dr Kelly was "most unlikely" to have been Gilligan's source.

At prime minister's questions Mr Blair refused to apologise to Dr Kelly and called once again for the BBC to name Gilligan's source.

"The ministry of defence made it clear that of course they don't know who the source is. There's only one body that does - the BBC. All they have to do is say yes or no - why don't they?," said the prime minister.

Since grilling Dr Kelly the committee has written to Gilligan asking him to give evidence about the source for a second time.

The BBC is still considering whether to accede to the committee's demands.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857


15.07.2003: Mole casts doubt on MoD claims
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,998741,00.html

Mole casts doubt on MoD claims

Ciar Byrne
Tuesday July 15, 2003


 

Kelly: 'The account is not one that I recognise'
 

David Kelly, the Ministry of Defence mole who has admitted talking to BBC correspondent Andrew Gilligan, has told MPs he may not have been the main source for the contentious claims that Downing Street "sexed up" a dossier about Iraqi weapons of mass destruction.

Dr Kelly told the foreign afffairs select committee that he met Gilligan in September 2002, in February before he went to Iraq, and again on May 22 at the Charing Cross hotel in central London.

But asked by MPs whether he thought he was the main source for Gilligan's report, Dr Kelly said: "No."

"From the conversations I had with him, I don't know how he could have had the authority to make the statements he is making," Dr Kelly said.

"It's not a factual record of my interaction with him. The account is not one that I recognise from my conversations with him," he added.

However, he said that there were some elements of Gilligan's report that did seem to have stemmed from their conversation, and he admitted that Alastair Campbell's name did crop up in their conversation in May.

Gilligan's source alleged that Mr Campbell had put pressure on the intelligence chiefs preparing the dossier last September to include the claim that Saddam Hussein could deploy WMDs within 45 minutes.

"The Campbell word did come up from the conversation about Iraq, its weapons and the failure for them to be used," Dr Kelly said.

He continued to cast further doubt on whether he was the main source of Gilligan's report for BBC Radio 4's Today programme on May 29, which lead to a damaging row that has raged for weeks.

The BBC has always said that Gilligan had known the "senior intelligence source" whom he relied on in his report for several years.

When Dr Kelly first came forward and admitted he had briefed Gilligan, the MoD initially stated that he had known Gilligan for a few months, later changing this to years.

Today, Dr Kelly told MPs that he met Gilligan for the first time less than a year ago in September 2002, and then on two subsequent occasions.

"The approach by Mr Gilligan was to consult with me before he visited Iraq. The outcome of our meeting in February was that he would provide me with feedback of his visit to Iraq."

Of their subsequent meeting in May, he said: "It was an occasion when I expected to get information about Iraq, about some of the personalities he's encountered, his experiences during the war and with Iraqi minders before the war."

"My conversation with him was primarily about Iraq, his experiences in Iraq and the consequences of the war, the failure to use WMDs during the war and the failure to find - by May 22 - WMDs."

Dr Kelly said he could not be sure that he had not alluded to Campbell in his conversation with Gilligan, but said that it "didn't sound" like something he would say. "I find it very difficult to recall a conversation that happened six weeks ago. I couldn't say for certain that such a statement was made."

He added that it was not his decision to come forward publicly - "I don't know who made that decision, I certainly did not make it myself" - but said he "accepted" the process that had followed his decision to tell his superiors about the meeting with Gilligan.

Dr Kelly also confirmed that he had met Susan Watts, the Newsnight reporter who said she had talked to "a senior official intimately involved with the process of pulling together the September dossier".

Watts's source claimed the intelligence services came under heavy political pressure over the evidence that Saddam's weapons of mass destruction could be ready for use within 45 minutes.

The BBC has refused to confirm or deny whether Dr Kelly was the main source of Gilligan's story.

When he gave evidence to the committee, Gilligan said he had met with a number of contacts to discuss Iraq's weapons.

Dr Kelly, the former head of microbiology at MoD research centre Porton Down, has advised the ministry on Iraq, WMDs and weapons inspections for the last decade.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857
 


15.07.2003: Kaufman calls for BBC press ban

16.07.2003: MPs say scientist not BBC source
http://media.guardian.co.uk/presspublishing/story/0,7495,998630,00.html

Kaufman calls for BBC press ban

Ciar Byrne
Tuesday July 15, 2003


 

Gilligan: BBC defence correspondent wrote controversial article in Mail on Sunday about Iraq dossier claims
 

BBC journalists should be barred from writing columns for newspapers in the wake of the Iraq dossier row, veteran Labour backbencher Gerald Kaufman said today.

Mr Kaufman called on BBC bosses to force defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan to choose between writing "contentious, controversial" articles for the press and working for the corporation.

"Just as you sacked Rod Liddle [the Guardian columnist and former editor of BBC Radio 4's Today] you ought to give Mr Gilligan a choice between writing controversial polemical articles and continuing to work for the BBC. There's no doubt he should have been told long ago to stop writing these articles," said Mr Kaufman.

The MP told members of the BBC's board of governors the same choice should be presented to other senior BBC figures who write for newspapers, including Today presenter John Humphrys and the BBC's political editor, Andrew Marr.

Greg Dyke, the BBC director general, said Liddle had been given the choice to leave Today after he wrote a Guardian article about the countryside march that breached the corporation's rules on impartiality.

"We didn't sack him, he chose to leave. He was editor of the Today programme and wrote something we regarded as completely unacceptable," said Mr Dyke. "We have many people who present for the BBC, it is not an easy line to draw."

He added the BBC changed its guidelines on staff writing for newspapers following Liddle's resignation and said the governors had asked BBC management to review these rules again.

In a statement issued last week the BBC's board of governors demanded a review of BBC staff who write for newspapers and magazines.

Richard Sambrook, the head of news at the BBC, said: "I agree there's an issue we need to review and report back to the board of governors."

Gilligan, the Today journalist at the centre of the row between the BBC and Downing Street over the corporation's coverage of the weapons threat posed by Iraq, wrote about the situation in a piece for the Mail on Sunday.

BBC insiders have already admitted the Mail on Sunday article, written shortly after Gilligan's Iraq dossier story was broadcast on May 29, provided unnecessary ammunition for the prime minister's communications director, Alastair Campbell.

The article went further than his original BBC report. In the piece Gilligan said his intelligence source alleged claims that Saddam Hussein could launch weapons of mass destruction within 45 minutes had been personally ordered by Mr Campbell.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857

 



14.07.2003: Is Phil Bassett the new Alastair Campbell?
http://media.guardian.co.uk/marketingandpr/story/0,7494,998009,00.html

Is Phil Bassett the new Alastair Campbell?

Westminster is buzzing with speculation about what will happen when Alastair Campbell stands down. Despite apparent protestations from No 10's communications chief that Tony Blair 'couldn't cope' without him, few believe Mr Campbell will hold the same job this time next year. One name is already being touted as favourite to replace him - Phil Bassett

Julia Day
Monday July 14, 2003


 


Campbell: believed to be on the verge of resigning
 

The former Times journalist tipped to step into Alastair Campbell's shoes when the prime minister's closest aide quits is married to a baroness, sends his son to one of the country's most exclusive public schools and lives in a £750,000 manor house.

Phil Bassett, the head of the No 10 research and information unit, is well versed in controversy, having played a key role in the government's long-running dispute with the fire service.

He is well prepared to step from one of Downing Street's back rooms directly into the media spotlight.

Mr Campbell, the government's director of communications and strategy, is believed to be on the verge of resigning and may leave his post when his wife, Fiona Millar, departs her job as Cherie Blair's adviser later this year.

Mr Campbell decided to hand over the responsibility for the twice-daily lobby correspondent briefings to Tom Kelly and Godric Smith, two civil servants, following the 2001 election when he was branded "the real deputy prime minister".

However, he has never left the spotlight or lost the "chief spin doctor" tag.

If Mr Bassett succeeds Mr Campbell he will inherit one of the most controversial positions in government.

"He is a real back-room man, hardly any of us know him face to face," said one newspaper Westminster correspondent.

"We know very little about him but we won't be surprised if he takes over from Alastair.

"Phil Bassett is one of the inner circle and is trusted by Tony Blair. In that sense he could fill Alastair's shoes, although no one could fill them entirely."

Mr Bassett, a former industrial correspondent at the Times and the Financial Times, joined Downing Street after the 1997 election.

He now shapes the government's strategic media activity and has written many of the newspaper articles Mr Blair has put his name to.

He is married to the foreign office minister and future leader of the House of Lords, Baroness Symons, and divides his time between a country house in Hampshire and a mansion flat overlooking Westminster Cathedral. His son attends the £10,000-a-year public school St Paul's.

With his journalistic knowledge of industry, Mr Bassett has become a critic of the trade unions and has helped shape the government's industrial relations strategy.

Charlie Whelan, a former press secretary to the chancellor, Gordon Brown, accused Mr Bassett of "spoiling for a fight" with the unions and of using the firefighters' pay dispute as a means of teaching other unions a lesson.

Mr Campbell also has a journalistic background, having worked as the political editor of the Daily Mirror.

Another political journalist said: "Phil Bassett is very close to New Labour journalists like [the BBC's] Andrew Marr, is very hard working and is clearly keen on replacing Alastair Campbell."

Following the row over Mr Campbell's role in the publication of the Iraq weapons dossiers, the subsequent clash with the BBC and calls for the resignation of Mr Blair, the appointment of a communications chief could not come at a more contentious and crucial time for the government.

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857
 


12.07.2003: Speculation grows over Campbell
10.07.2003: MPs will question MoD arms consultant
10.07.2003: Scientist named as BBC contact
09.07.2003: Short attacks 'bully' Campbell
09.07.2003: Hoon names MoD 'mole' in move BBC brands a farce
09.07.2003: BBC rejects deal on naming dossier source
09.07.2003: BBC chairman's letter to Geoff Hoon
08.07.2003: MoD man admits he met Gilligan
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,994183,00.html

MoD man admits he met Gilligan

Jason Deans
Tuesday July 8, 2003


 

Gilligan: quoted single, 'senior' source in story
 

In an extraordinary development this evening, a Ministry of Defence official has come forward to admit meeting Andrew Gilligan, the journalist at the centre of the Iraq dossier row between the BBC and the government, shortly before he broadcast the story that ignited the whole affair.

The government has issued a statement saying that an MoD official has come forward and admitted meeting Gilligan on May 22.

Gilligan's story, which quoted a single intelligence source in claiming that Alastair Campbell had "sexed up" last September's Iraq dossier, was broadcast on BBC Radio 4's Today programme a week later.

The MoD official said he met Gilligan, who he had known for "some months", at a central London hotel, and that the BBC defence correspondent asked him about weapons of mass destruction and Alastair Campbell.

"He says that when Mr Gilligan asked about the role of Alastair Campbell with regard to the 45 minute issue, he made no comment and explained that he was not involved in the process of drawing up the intelligence parts of the dossier," the statement said.

"He made no other comment about Mr Campbell. When Mr Gilligan asked him why the 45 minute point was in the dossier, he says he commented that it was 'probably for impact'. He says he did not see the 45 minute intelligence report on which it was based."

The government said the official was "not one of the senior officials in charge of drawing up the [Iraq] dossiers", in a move clearly designed to try and discredit Gilligan's story.

"He is not a member of the intelligence services or the defence intelligence staff," the statement added.

He said that, as an expert in the field who had advised ministers on the issue and had contributed towards drafts of the historical accounts of UN inspections in the first government dossier, he believed Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.

The MoD said the official was an expert on weapons of mass destruction. "We do not know whether this official is the single source quoted by Mr Gilligan. Mr Gilligan told [the Foreign Affairs select committee] he had only one source for his story and that the other three sources he mentioned to the FAC did not talk to him about the September dossier, or did so after the broadcast."

The MoD said that, with the agreement of the official concerned, it had now passed his name to the chairman of the parliamentary intelligence and security committee, Ann Taylor, in case the members wanted to interview him as part of their inquiry.

Gilligan and BBC News director Richard Sambrook have repeatedly stated that his source was senior enough to make the claims included in the journalist's Today story worth reporting.

It is almost certain that the MoD would have had a witchhunt for the intelligence moles who talked to Gilligan, and tonight's statement appears to be designed to put the BBC on the back foot.

Earlier today, the corporation's director general, Greg Dyke, insisted he would not be apologising for the story and urged Alastair Campbell to "agree to disagree" and to move on.

This latest development shows that the government have no intention of letting up in their war of words, and may mean that the row drags on for weeks.
 


MediaGuardian.co.uk special reports
The BBC
Iraq: the media war
http://media.guardian.co.uk/broadcast/story/0,7493,1000991,00.html

Iraq: the media war David Kelly Kelly latest Blair promises public inquiry over scientist


 

Kelly: Blair promises public inquiry

Jason Deans
Friday July 18, 2003


 


Police outside Dr Kelly's house this morning
 

Tony Blair has promised an independent judicial inquiry if David Kelly has died, journalists travelling with the prime minister on his flight from Washington to Tokyo have said.

His spokesman, Godric Smith, came to the back of the plane less than an hour ago to announce the possible inquiry.

He said a judge would be named this afternoon by the Ministry of Defence.

The development comes as Thames Valley police confirmed the description of the body found near Dr Kelly's home in Oxfordshire matched that of the MoD scientist.

A spokesman confirmed there would be no formal identification until tomorrow.

"We are currently treating this incident as an unexplained death and we will have to wait for the results of the postmortem," he said.

Tony Blair was told of the disappearance of Dr Kelly early this morning and spent much of his flight on the telephone, according to Sky News.

The prime minister's spokesman said he was very concerned for the family of Dr Kelly and promised a public inquiry if his death was confirmed.

"If it is Dr Kelly, there will be a public inquiry, I urge you not to jump to conclusions," said Godric Smith, the prime minister's official spokesman, who is travelling on the plane with Mr Blair.

His comments were reported by the political editor of Sky News, Adam Boulton and by BBC Radio 5.

Alastair Campbell, who usually travels with Mr Blair, is not on the plane - he is on his way back to London.

Mr Smith said he was unable to confirm whether the prime minister has spoken to Mr Campbell but said there was no reason to believe that he had resigned.

"While he understands there will be no formal identification until tomorrow, if it is Dr Kelly the prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family and the Ministry of Defence intends to hold an independent judicial inquiry and there will be an announcement this afternoon as to the name of the judge," Boulton reported.

The MoD said Dr Kelly had at no point been threatened with suspension or dismissal as a result of his admission he had spoken to Gilligan.

It was made clear to Dr Kelly at the time that he had broken civil service rules by having unauthorised contact with a journalist, but "that was the end of it", said a spokesman.

Dr Kelly was given five days to consider his options before the MoD issued its statement on Tuesday July 8 to say an unnamed official had spoken to Gilligan.

And he was given an opportunity to talk through the possible ramifications of going public before the statement was released.

The MoD spokesman said: "He was first interviewed before the weekend and then asked to think about what the options were over the weekend and a decision was taken to say nothing in the meantime.

"He was interviewed again on the Monday and the question of what was the best way forward was talked through with him.

"The contents of the statement were cleared with him before it went out and it was flagged up to him that it was possible his name might get into the public domain at some point and that it was likely the intelligence and security committee and foreign affairs committee would want to take evidence from him."

The spokesman added that the MoD had offered Dr Kelly the use of alternative accommodation to avoid any press attention at his home address.

When he appeared before the committee, Tory MP Sir John Stanley told Dr Kelly he had acted in a "proper and honourable manner" in coming forward to suggest he may have been Gilligan's source but had been "thrown to the wolves" by the Ministry of Defence.

Earlier today a scientist colleague of Dr Kelly said it was because he had so much integrity that he had come forward.

Professor Alistair Hay said the way Dr Kelly had been treated by politicians before the foreign affairs select committee earlier this week was "absolutely inexcusable".

"His whole demeanour during the foreign affairs committee was one of someone who had beaten by the process. I was just so worried by his whole demeanour at the FAC. I just think the pressure is intolerable for someone like him. He is a professional scientist, not somebody who should be a ping pong ball for politicians," Prof Hay told Radio 5 today after police revealed they had found a body near Dr Kelly's home.

Dr Kelly had met Gilligan in the Charing Cross Hotel in central London on May 22, a week before the claim that No 10 had inserted intelligence that Saddam Hussein could launch a chemical or biological weapons strike within 45 minutes was broadcast on the Radio 4 Today programme.

The story has sparked a lengthy and bitter row between the government, the BBC and critics of the war on Iraq.

Dr Kelly told the committee he did not think he could have been the source for the story because Gilligan's account of his conversation with the contact differed from his own version of events.

The foreign affairs committee chairman, Donald Anderson, told Sky News: "On the face of it, this appears to be a human tragedy, if the news is now confirmed, and puts much of the discussion which we have had in a very different and personal perspective."

Later Richard Ottoway, a Tory MP who was on the committee, said he felt the implications of the latest developments were very serious. He said the committee's conclusion that Dr Kelly was unlikely to have been Gilligan's source was flagrantly ignored by No 10, which reacted by saying it was 99% sure Dr Kelly was the BBC reporter's source.

He rejected the idea the committee's questioning of the former weapons inspector had been unduly harsh.

Mr Anderson said there was "no way in which government ministers can be blamed" for the way in which Dr Kelly's name became public.

And he rejected suggestions that the committee should reconvene to consider its position in the light of today's events.

"It is awful, but this is not relevant any more to the work of our committee."

To contact the MediaGuardian newsdesk email editor@mediaguardian.co.uk or phone 020 7239 9857
http://media.guardian.co.uk/iraqandthemedia/story/0,12823,1001026,00.html
 

Timeline: Dr David Kelly

Friday July 18, 2003

July 8
At 5.55pm the government issues a statement saying a Ministry of Defence official has come forward and admitted meeting BBC defence correspondent Andrew Gilligan on May 22. The official said he met Gilligan, whom he had known for "some months", at a central London hotel, and that he had been asked about weapons of mass destruction and Alastair Campbell.

"He says that when Mr Gilligan asked about the role of Alastair Campbell with regard to the 45 minute issue, he made no comment and explained that he was not involved in the process of drawing up the intelligence parts of the dossier," the statement said.

"He made no other comment about Mr Campbell. When Mr Gilligan asked him why the 45 minute point was in the dossier, he says he commented that it was 'probably for impact'. He says he did not see the 45 minute intelligence report on which it was based."

The government says the official is not one of the senior officials involved in drawing up the September dossier, but an expert who has advised ministers on weapons of mass destruction.

The BBC responds, saying the description issued by the government does not match Gilligan's source in important ways - "Mr Gilligan's source does not work in the Ministry of Defence and he has known the source for a number of years, not months," the BBC says in a statement.

July 9
Geoff Hoon, the defence secretary, writes to BBC chairman Gavyn Davies asking him to confirm or deny whether Dr David Kelly, a renowned microbiologist and advisor to the Ministry of Defence, was the original source of Gilligan's story. The BBC steadfastly refuses to reveal any information about its source, saying it will not be drawn into a trap.

Tony Blair's spokesman says the approach is "not an assault on journalistic sources, this is not an assault on the BBC, it is not a vendetta". He insists it is a "genuine attempt to get at the truth behind what is one of the most serious allegations you can make against a government".

The BBC responds by saying the story has descended into farce. "The MoD has lost all credibility on this issue. It completely changed its story overnight for spurious reasons, and we intend to draw a line under the matter. We are not going to discuss our source," the corporation says in a statement.

The MoD issues a statement saying it has named the official who has come forward in a letter to the BBC, but not naming the source. However, by the end of the day some lobby journalists have mysteriously learnt of his identity.

When the Times political reporting team contacts the MoD and put Dr Kelly's name to the department, his name is confirmed. By 11.40pm he has been named as Gilligan's source on the Press Association newswire.

Downing Street categorically denies being the source of the leak. In its report on July 10, the Times says Downing Street is "99% convinced" that Dr Kelly is Gilligan's source.

July 15
Dr Kelly is called to give evidence before the foreign affairs select committee. Asked by MPs whether he thinks he is the main source for Gilligan's story he says: "No." He admits meeting Gilligan on three occasions since September 2002, including a meeting on May 22 at the Charing Cross hotel in central London.

Dr Kelly says that while certain aspects of Gilligan's report tallied with their conversation, his account of Campbell's intervention in the September dossier was not "a factual record of my interaction with him". "From the conversations I had with him, I don't know how he could have had the authority to make the statements he is making," Dr Kelly told the committee.

He also admits meeting with Newsnight science correspondent Susan Watts after a talk he had given on November 5 last year, and to speaking to her in several telephone conversations subsequently.

MPs on the committee back Dr Kelly's denial, issuing a statement saying he was "most unlikely" to have been the source behind the "sexed up" dossier claim and criticising the government's treatment of him. The committee says Dr Kelly has been "poorly treated" by the defence minister, and Labour member Andrew Mackinlay says he had been used as a "fall guy".

Donald Anderson, the chairman of the committee, writes to foreign secretary Jack Straw demanding an apology for the way Dr Kelly was treated.

July 16
Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith calls on Tony Blair to apologise for the treatment of Dr Kelly. Speaking at prime minister's questions, Mr Blair refuses to apologise and once again calls on the BBC to name Gilligan's source.

"The Ministry of Defence made it clear that of course they don't know who the source is. There's only one body that does - the BBC. All they have to do is say yes or no - why don't they?" asks the prime minister.

July 17
At 3pm Dr Kelly leaves his home at Southmoor, near Abingdon in Oxfordshire, telling his wife he is going for a walk. Although he is accustomed to walking for several hours at a time in the footpaths near his home, he is dressed inappropriately for the wet weather, wearing only a shirt and not taking a coat with him. When he fails to return home by 11.45pm, his family contacts the police.

July 18
Dr Kelly is reported missing by Thames Valley Police. Around 9.20am, police find the body of a male at Harrowdown Hill near to Dr Kelly's home. There are no other reported missing persons in the area, and Dr Kelly is known to have enjoyed walking near the hill, about 45 minutes to an hour from his home.

Reuters
WMD Scientist's Death Rocks British Government
Fri Jul 18 17:28:40 2003
208.152.73.116

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A11298-2003Jul18.html

WMD Scientist's Death Rocks British Government
Reuters
Friday, July 18, 2003; 1:37 PM

By Gideon Long

LONGWORTH, England (Reuters) - A mild-mannered British scientist was found dead in the woods Friday after being unwittingly dragged into a fierce political dispute about intelligence used to justify war on Iraq.

British police said they had found a body matching that of soft-spoken defense ministry biologist David Kelly, a former U.N. weapons inspector, who had been grilled in parliament over allegations the government hyped intelligence to justify war.

The political fallout was immediate. Prime Minister Tony Blair, who learned about the discovery of the body while flying from Washington to Tokyo, promised an independent judicial inquiry into the death if the body was confirmed to be Kelly's.

But opponents called for Blair to return and face a broader probe into the case he made for war. The shock even sent Britain's pound tumbling half a percent on currency markets as traders weighed the severity of the crisis for Blair.

Kelly's family reported him missing overnight after he went for a walk in the Oxfordshire countryside Thursday with no coat and stayed out despite a rainstorm.

He had denied being the source for BBC reporter Andrew Gilligan, who said in May a senior intelligence source had told him the government had "sexed up" intelligence on Iraq.

That report sparked parliamentary hearings into how the government made the case for war, forced Blair onto the defensive and pitted government officials against the BBC.

News of Kelly's death completely overshadowed Blair's rapturous reception by the U.S. Congress Thursday, although there was no indication the prime minister would turn back from a scheduled week-long trip to Asia.

"The prime minister is obviously very distressed for the family of Dr Kelly," a spokesman said aboard the flight.

Opposition Conservative Party leader Iain Duncan Smith said Blair should return from abroad and any inquiry should cover the entire issue of intelligence used to justify the war.

"If I was the prime minister, I would cut short this visit and return home. There are very many questions that will need to be asked over the coming days," he said.

RELUCTANT WITNESS

Kelly had clearly been reluctant to enter the public debate over Iraq intelligence.

Speaking so softly he could barely be heard, he admitted to parliament's foreign affairs committee he had met Gilligan, but denied telling him that Blair's communications chief Alastair Campbell had ordered intelligence to be hyped.

Kelly appeared shell-shocked when parliamentarians at the hearing described him as "chaff" and a government "fall guy" put forward to shield top officials from blame.

Kelly's wife Jane described Kelly as deeply upset, family friend Tom Mangold, a television journalist, told ITV News.

"She told me he had been under considerable stress, that he was very, very angry about what had happened at the committee, that he wasn't well," Mangold said.

The government said that if Kelly was Gilligan's source, their differing accounts proved the BBC story was wrong. Gilligan, who never named his source, was questioned at a closed-door hearing around the time Kelly vanished Thursday.

(Additional reporting by Peter Graff and Dominic Evans in London, and Katherine Baldwin in Tokyo)
_____________________________________________________________________
"At a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act" - George Orwell
 

BBC News
Journalists 'must protect whistleblowers'
Fri Jul 18 15:46:56 2003
208.152.73.146

Journalists 'must protect whistleblowers'
BBC News
Friday, 18 July, 2003, 13:56 GMT 14:56 UK

The apparent death of Dr David Kelly has put the spotlight back on the BBC 's refusal to name its source for the story that an Iraqi weapons dossier was "sexed up".

The missing weapons expert had been identified by the government as a contact of journalist Andrew Gilligan and the possible source of his reports - a claim questioned by the BBC and Dr Kelly himself.

The plight of Dr Kelly's family continued as Mr Gilligan made a second appearance before a Commons committee, which said journalists should be forced to name sources if speaking under Parliamentary privilege.

It is a demand likely to alarm many journalists, who are expected to honour a long-standing tradition of protecting those who come forward with information.

No case has provoked more interest than that of 'Deep Throat', who tipped off journalists about the Watergate scandal in 1973 and has never been formally identified.

Mr Gilligan's refusal to name his contact is one of many other examples of journalists standing by their sources - with reporters and their employers often finding themselves the subject of expensive legal actions.

'Golden rule'

Jeremy Dear, general secretary of the National Union of Journalists, said "whistleblowers" must be protected as they "will not come forward if they think they are going to be grassed up at a later stage".

He called on reporters not to be swayed, arguing that one of the key roles of journalists was to expose wrong doing and bad practice by public institutions and big corporations.

"For that reason it is the golden rule of journalism that we don't betray our sources and are prepared to go to prison to uphold that principle," he told BBC News Online.

"It is not our job to act as information providers for state institutions. They have thousands of people employed to do that work."

'No dilemma'

It is a position backed by Robin Ackroyd, who was ordered by the High Court to say who gave him medical information about Moors murderer Ian Brady, which he used in a story for the Daily Mirror.

Mr Ackroyd, who won an appeal against the decision but still faces an ongoing legal battle, said: "Journalists protect their sources because they have a professional duty of confidence to them.

"It is not a standpoint we take because we are being difficult or precious."

The freelance journalist said Andrew Gilligan deserved the support of the media and the public and that the Commons committee had been naive to expect him to name names.

He said: "Journalists must stand their ground. And they do stand their ground.

"I have never had one iota of doubt about my own position. I simply have no dilemma.

"I do not reveal confidential sources of information as an overriding matter of conscience."

Bloody Sunday

Last year journalists were also forced to protect their sources under questioning at the Bloody Sunday inquiry into the events of 30 January 1972, when 13 civilians were shot dead by British army soldiers. A 14th person died later.

BBC reporter Peter Taylor refused to reveal several republican, British Army and police sources to the investigation.

Mr Taylor said: "My motivation is simply my wish to preserve my ability to carry out my duties as a journalist and to protect those who have assisted me in the past."

Under cross examination at the inquiry, former Sunday Times reporter Derek Humphry refused to reveal the identities of two republicans.

They were the head of the Bogside IRA and a woman who was reported to be at a hastily arranged meeting of Provisionals when the shootings on Bloody Sunday started.

Cruise Missiles

But journalists are not always able to defend their sources.

Sarah Tisdall famously received a six-month jail sentence in 1983 after the Guardian named her as the source of its story about the arrival of Cruise Missiles in the UK.

She had been a clerk in the office of the Foreign Secretary Michael Heseltine and had passed documents on to the paper.

The paper named her after it was ordered by a court to reveal its contact.

Ms Tisdall ended up spending four months in prison.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3076813.stm
----------------------------------------------------------
President Delivers "State of the Union"

For Immediate Release
Office of the Press Secretary

January 28, 2003
CLICK:

 

Ghulam Muhammed
Blair in trouble
Fri Jul 18 14:08:49 2003
202.68.150.4

Friday, July 18, 2003

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR

There is no way; Tony Blair can assuage people’s horror at the death of Dr. Kelly as being a by-product his government’s tireless efforts to put a lid on the ongoing scandal ready to explode, now that the bogus intelligence cited by Blair and company has turned out to be a fraud perpetrated on the British public. Dr. Kelly had appeared before the parliamentary enquiry denying that he was the source to alert BBC reporter Andrew Gilligan, about the spin doctoring of intelligence reports to sex up the case to invade Iraq. More than even Bush, Blair fought both a skeptical nation and his own divided party to persist in going to war by declaring the Saddam can deliver his WMD within 45 minutes. At least Bush has the Jewish cabal to take the heat for imposing a self-serving agenda on the willing Bush coterie. The public in Britain should be wondering as to who was blackmailing Blair to take such a politically suicidal course.

In the event this has turned out to be very ugly. And criminal. Nothing will save Blair now, even if he is personally not involved in any way with the death of Dr. Kelly. Blair had gone on a limb to support America’s illegal war and much before Bush will reap the bitter harvest of his own perjuries coming to haunt him, Blair will be lucky, if he can wiggle out of this mess.

GHULAM MUHAMMED, P.O.BOX: 16685, BANDRA WEST, MUMBAI - 400 050
ghulam_muhammed2@yahoo.co.in
 

Gentle man with core of steel
 
Dr Kelly wanted to help journalists understand a complex topic

Friends and colleagues have been paying tribute to Dr David Kelly.

Scott Ritter, who worked with him as part of the UN weapons inspections team in Iraq, said he was a man of "integrity, character, and somebody who cared deeply about his country".

 

Mr Ritter, who lead the UN inspection team up until it left Iraq in 1998, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that Dr Kelly was somebody who had doggedly pursued the Iraqi biological weapons program and who had never caved in to pressure.

He said: "My experience of David is that he is a man who does his job and does it quietly.

"While a gentle man, he had a core of steel in him. I've seen him interact with Iraq government officials; there was no give in this man."

 

Tremendous loss

Tom Mangold, a television journalist and close friend of Dr Kelly, said he had made himself available to many serious journalists because he wanted to help them understand a complex topic.

Mr Mangold said: "He was a man whose brain could boil water, he used words with tremendous precision, he used them as weapons.

"There was nothing he didn't know about biological warfare and there wasn't much he didn't know about WMD."

Mr Mangold said Dr Kelly had not been particularly interested in journalism or journalists.

"He was passionately interested in what happens in Iraq," he said.

"That was one of the reasons why Saddam Hussein wanted him out more than anybody else."

Great loss

Richard Butler, former chief United Nation weapons inspector in Iraq, said he had known David Kelly well.

"He was one of the lead biologists on my team. I liked him as a man. Above all I had a deep faith in his honesty and professional integrity. He's a great loss.

"I will never forget the way he always insisted to me no matter what political pressure that was put on us, that we had to tell the truth, absolutely the truth, maybe this is part of why these terrible events have taken place."

 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/3079775.stm

From: Dstacey
To: 
Sent: Sunday, July 20, 2003 5:02 AM
Subject: Dr. Kelly: was he assassinated?

 

The strange death of Dr. Kelly in England raises the possibility that he was assassinated. Many would doubt that there could be an assassination effort involving governments. Here are a couple of recent items on the subject.

In the first, THE PEGASUS FILE: A former CIA deep-cover agent turns whistleblower at great risk. His shocking allegations expose powerful names controlling the international drug trade in very high places, an article by David G. Guyatt appearing in NEXUS Magazine( http://www.nexusmagazine.com/pegfile1.html ), the story of Chip Tatum,a 25 year deep cover CIA agent, contains some information about "Pegasus" the code name for an assassination team that he ran under George H. W. Bush.

The second and third items relate to the Mossad and Israel's assassination capability.

+++++++++++++++

 PEGASUS: ASSASSINATION & NEUTRALISATION

Tatum has gone into considerable additional detail regarding the role of Pegasus as he knew it. He believes Pegasus was established during the Eisenhower years as a secret group inside the CIA to spy on that agency on behalf of the President. At some point - believed to be after the assassination of President Kennedy - Pegasus went AWOL from direct US Government control and came under the direction of an international Board of Directors which Tatum alleges now includes George Bush and Henry Kissinger.

The directors of Pegasus meet once a year in secret conclave following G7 meetings. The group has "representation" from a number of intelligence agencies throughout the world. Included are the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF) as well as agents from British, Israeli, Turkish and Danish Intelligence plus "others who performed various functions for Pegasus".7 The mission of Pegasus, Tatum explains, is "to 'align' world leaders and financiers to our [US] policies and standards".

One of Tatum's Pegasus duties included flying "Archer Teams" (four-man hit teams) in his helicopter to their insertion point.8 He states that Enrique Bermudez was assassinated in 1991 by a Pegasus team, adding he "was shot in the back of the head while walking down the street...from about 150 yards". Bermudez, known as "Commander Three Eight Zero" was the senior Contra leader. Tatum received two broken ribs when he came under small-arms fire during the assassination.9

Following the Nicaraguan war, Bermudez sought a prominent position in the new government. Spurned by President Chamorro, "Commander 380" tried to pressure George Bush to intercede on his behalf, threatening to expose Bush's role in the cocaine trafficking enterprise. According to Tatum, Bush ordered his disposal.

Another Pegasus assassination was that of General Gustavo (Dr Gus) Alvarez Martinez, the "cooperating" Armed Forces Commander-in-Chief, Honduras. Alvarez was assassinated in 1989, following his demand for a bigger split of the cocaine profits.

Tatum also describes his involvement in the assassination of Amiram Nir, the former Israeli Mossad agent who went under the assumed name of Pat Weber. Nir was scheduled to testify to the Senate subcommittee and it was feared he would reveal the truth. He perished, following the shooting-down of his aircraft with missiles from Tatum's helicopter.

Other "neutralisations" verge on the bizarre. An individual who must remain nameless for a variety of reasons - but whose name is known to this writer - underwent an experience that is both horrific and chilling. Readers are warned that what follows is not at all pleasant. For the sake of ease, I shall call this individual "Mr X" or, simply, "X".10

Mr X was a leader of one of the largest CIA-backed Contra groups. He recently testified before the US Senate Intelligence Committee. Formerly, X was a senior executive in a South American subsidiary of a leading US soft drinks corporation. During his Senate testimony, he denied any knowledge of CIA involvement in the narcotics trade, adding that condoning such activity would have been foreign to his way of life. Not so, says Tatum. Mr X had been recruited into the CIA by then-Director William Casey, with the assistance of Oliver North.

In 1990, when Nicaraguan leader Daniel Ortega announced there would be "free elections", X was ecstatic. He began jostling for position and asked President Bush to ensure he be given a prominent position in the new government - in return for his years of toil at the behest of the CIA and the Enterprise. The pressure came in a form that Bush could not ignore. Failure to help his friend would result in X's intimate knowledge of Bush's involvement in the dope trade being made public. His threat left Bush with a sour taste. A Pegasus team was assigned to "neutralise" him in early 1990.

Mr X, Tatum states, "fancied himself a lover of women. Tall, large-breasted blondes were his favourite. It was determined that, if effectively neutralised, [X] could be an asset. Therefore, it was decided that intimidation would be used to control [X]."

They chose to use the drug Scopolamine, which also went by the nickname "Burundanga" or "the Voodoo drug". The drug is extracted from the pods of a flowering shrub that grows in remote regions of South America. In its processed, powdered form, Scopolamine is "void of smell, void of taste". When properly administered "it causes absolute obedience" without this being "observable by others". Importantly, the target will not recall any of the events that occurred during the period they were under the spell of the drug.

In outlining these details, Tatum adds that it is important to administer the drug in the correct dosage, for he has known targets to die from too high a dose. Others have "remained under the influence of Burundanga for up to three weeks". Precise dosage can be achieved by liquid ingestion, the powder being readily soluble. Ingestion via cigarettes is also an optimum method of ingestion. It is fast-acting and takes no more than 20 minutes to work.

Tatum states that X was invited to spend a relaxing weekend at a luxury hotel as a guest of his friend George Bush. His host for the weekend was a trusted 18-year veteran field-intelligence officer. The evening started with cocktails and was followed by a fine meal. "'Nothing but the best' were the orders."

Following the meal, he was ushered into the suite of a "blonde bombshell" supplied by the CIA. Mr X had already ingested a dose of Burundanga during pre-dinner cocktails. X was gallant with the blonde as they both moved into the bedroom where video cameras were already set up in one corner. In short order, the blonde had X standing naked in front of her and began to indulge his desires. All the while, the video cameras whirred. Slowly stripping off, the "blonde" revealed his manhood in all its glory. Mr X was instructed to reciprocate the favour and perform fellatio. He obliged, his intimate activities recorded at 24 frames a second on videotape.

Tatum says the male prostitute was hired from a bar in New York and killed that same evening.

Two weeks later, X - wholly unaware of the events of that evening - was visited in Nicaragua. He was presented with a copy of the video footage, along with instructions. Tatum says that X can never allow that video to be seen: "Not only does it reveal his homosexuality, but it also reveals his bestiality and satanic worship rituals." As frame after frame flicked by, X reportedly wept, forced to watch himself kill his homosexual "lover" and then engage in the most grisly cannabalistic ritual imaginable.

Neutralised, Mr X became a leading member of the Nicaraguan government a few short weeks later.11

++++++

 

7. I wrote this sentence based on information provided to me and also extracted from a long list of Q&As prepared by author Rodney Stich for Tatum's attention (and now in my possession). In reviewing this article for errors and omissions, Tatum stated that "there were no US DEA or ATF agents in Pegasus". This appeared to conflict with an earlier reply to one of Stich's questions which stated, in part, that "DEA was represented. We had DEA agents, ATF agents." Naturally, I wanted this clarified and asked Tatum to explain this quite significant amendment. He replied, advising that "there were joint missions where DEA and ATF agents were used...they were not officially part of Pegasus". Nancy Tatum advises that since Chip Tatum was in prison at the time he answered questions submitted by Stich, the "misunderstanding" was hers.

8. Tatum adds that he also "flew fixed-wing, multi-engine props and jets...for the various missions" and he was not limited to rotary-wing aircraft.

9. These injuries occurred during the departure of the "Team", six hours after the assassination itself, when they came under anti-aircraft fire as they flew low-level across the border. Tatum was wearing two Kevlar (lightweight body armour) vests which absorbed the impact of incoming rounds.

10. Tatum has provided me with the name of this individual, a well-known politician. He also asked that I consider excising this account from the article, for a variety of understandable reasons. I have elected to keep it, as I believe it is both an important and highly significant account.

11. I phoned and spoke with Ron Lard, an official at the DEA HQ, Virginia, to ask about the properties of Burundanga. He was unable to provide any information. However, through other sources I can confirm that this drug is well known to cause both amnesia and a zombie-like trance in which the target follows all orders. Dr Camilo Uribe, head of BogotŠ's toxicology clinic, says "it's like chemical hypnotism". See Wall Street Journal, 3 July 1995.

 

 
 
Israeli Operatives Will Assassinate People Inside the U.S. and Other Allied Nations :.


Israel is embarking upon a more aggressive approach to the war on terror that will include staging targeted killings [this means assassinations] in the United States and other friendly countries, former Israeli intelligence officials told United Press International.

Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has forbidden the practice until now, these sources said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The Israeli statements were confirmed by more than a half dozen former and currently serving U.S. foreign policy and intelligence officials in interviews with United Press International.

 
                        http://www.cryptogon.com/2003_01_12_blogarchive.html#87535042
 
Kidon: Mossad's Assassination Squad :.

Interesting article about Israel's wet workers by Gordon Thomas:

A killing war between Israel's Mossad and Islamic fanatics came closer this weekend in Britain.

The Israeli intelligence agency has sent four members of its kidon assassination squad to this country, to join fifteen other handpicked katsas, its relentless field agents.

Their brief is to "disable" any of the "close to 50" British Muslims that the extremist Islamic group, Al-Muhajiroun, last week boasted were ready to carry out suicide missions similar to the one in Tel Aviv.

Al-Muhajiroun spokesman, Asif Butt, said the 50 were "primed and ready to go".

The threat was sufficient for Mossad to send its own termination squad to head off any further threat to Israel or to synagogues and other Jewish institutions in this country.

"In Mossad-speak 'disable' means taking them out permanently", said an MI5 source grimly. "We know from past experience that the kidon can make murder look like an accident. It is their speciality".

Two of the kidon are women. They have been trained to be ready to sleep with someone to obtain vital information.

Former Mossad chief Meir Amit said that "sex is a woman's weapon. Pillow talk is not a problem for her. But it takes a special kind of courage - to sleep with the enemy".

Mossad often operates outside the law of this country - or any country.


                http://www.cryptogon.com/2003_06_29_blogarchive.html#105723670164412953


From:                 "Donna ." <divulge@hotmail.com >
BCC to:              
Subject:              Kelly case arouses Mid-East suspicions
Date sent:            Sun, 20 Jul 2003 12:45:51 -0500

Last Updated: Sunday, 20 July, 2003, 16:52 GMT 17:52 UK


Kelly case arouses Mid-East suspicions


Middle East media have been looking at the death of Dr David Kelly,
the weapons inspector at the heart of the BBC 'mole' row.

Several newspapers consider his death as being at least suspicious.
Others accuse the government of "assassination".

The issue of the causes of the war in Iraq has been progressing like
a
large ball slowly rolling down the hill, seemingly unstoppable. The
scenario doubled its momentum with the death of British expert David
Kelly, which stamped the affair with a tormented human image and with
a whiff of conspiracy.

Yediot Aharonot - Israel


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

David Kelly - the British Government's adviser on Iraqi weapons who
was dispatched to Baghdad before the war, among the UN inspectors
without anybody finding anything of importance - was assassinated!

Al-Jumhuriyah - Egypt


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

The scandal has now started to go beyond its political dimensions to
encompass the physical elimination of all those who want to
demonstrate the falseness of the main accusation against Iraq over
its
possession of WMD... as is the case with the British weapons expert,
David Kelly.

Al-Watan - Saudi Arabia


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

The suspicious death of David Kelly, a member of the UN arms
inspectors team, is a big disgrace for the British and American
governments... While they deafen the world with their cries of
support
for human rights, they resort to lies, deceit, threats and killings
in
order to perpetuate their dirty and inhuman rule.

Jomhuri-ye Eslami - Iran


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

The suspicious death of the British weapons specialist David Kelly
has
plunged the cabinet of the British Prime Minister Tony Blair in a
serious crisis....The question now is why the British government
tried
to forge the "Iraq dodgy dossier"?

Tehran Times - Iran


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

Getting rid of Kelly is undoubtedly a strong and final warning to the
British media and media men that challenging the state in the
"secrets" of war leads to destruction, even if these secrets are
fabricated. It remains to be seen to what extent Kelly's absence can
serve the images of Blair and Bush.

Al-Hayat - London


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

Time has proved that Washington and London deliberately exaggerated
the Iraqi threat to justify their launching of the war, and that what
happened was carefully planned.

Al-Thawrah - Syria


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

His death shows that the information used by the British government
on
Iraq's WMD was false and that the British government lied to the
people about the war against Iraq.

Iranian radio


----------------------------------------------------------------------

----------

BBC Monitoring, based in Caversham in southern England, selects and
translates information from radio, television, press, news agencies
and the Internet from 150 countries in more than 70 languages.


http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3082203.stm

 

How long will it take to drag it out of them that he WAS assassinated?
Madd Maxx-
---------------------------
BBC says Kelly was weapons source
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3081027.stm
The BBC has disclosed that Dr David Kelly was the principal source for its controversial report claiming Downing Street "sexed up" an Iraq weapons dossier.
BBC director of news Richard Sambrook broke the news after speaking to the family of the Iraq weapons expert, who was found dead on Friday.
He said the corporation believed it correctly interpreted and reported the information obtained from Dr Kelly during interviews.
BBC journalist Andrew Gilligan, the author of the report, added that Dr Kelly had not been "misquoted or misrepresented".
Mr Sambrook said the BBC had, until now, owed Dr Kelly a duty of
confidentiality and was "profoundly sorry" that his involvement as the
source for the reports had ended in tragedy.
Prime Minister Tony Blair, speaking as he left Korea for China, said: "I am pleased that the BBC has made this announcement. Whatever the differences, no one wanted this tragedy to happen.
Dr Kelly expressed very similar concerns about Downing Street interpretation of intelligence in the dossier and the unreliability of the 45-minute point to Newsnight.
Andrew Gilligan BBC journalist "I know that everyone, including the BBC, have been shocked by it. The independent Hutton Inquiry has been set up, it will establish the facts.
"In the meantime our attitude should be one of respect and restraint, no recrimination, with the Kelly family uppermost in our minds at this time."
Earlier Mr Blair said he would accept responsibility for all the actions of government ministers and officials, but ruled out recalling Parliament.
Police confirmed on Saturday Dr Kelly, a senior Ministry of Defence adviser, had bled to death from a cut to his wrist. 'Not source'
In an e-mail reportedly sent to a New York Times journalist hours before his death, Dr Kelly had apparently warned of "many dark actors playing games". The Sunday Times says Dr Kelly told one of its reporters that he felt betrayed by the leaking of his name by the Ministry of Defence and was under "intolerable" pressure by being placed at the centre of the weapons row.
In the end the government is my responsibility and I can assure you the judge will be able to get to what facts, what people, what papers he wants Tony Blair Prime minister
Last week Dr Kelly had told MPs he had spoken to Mr Gilligan, but said he did not believe he was the main source for a story about claims that a dossier on Iraq had been "sexed up" to boost public support for military action.
He told the MPs: "From the conversation I had I don't see how he could make the authoritative statement he was making from the comments I made." According to television journalist Tom Mangold, a friend, Dr Kelly believed he was the source for about 60% of Mr Gilligan's report. Responsibility The government has set up an independent judicial inquiry, led by Lord Hutton, into the circumstances surrounding Dr Kelly's death. Both Mr Blair and the BBC have said they will cooperate fully.
The BBC statement prompted Dr Kelly's local MP, Tory Robert Jackson, to call for the resignation of the BBC chairman Gavyn Davies.
Ex-Labour minister Glenda Jackson has called for Tony Blair to quit, saying the blame for Dr Kelly's death lay with Downing Street, which, she said, used a battle with the BBC to divert attention from the failure to find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.
Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith has called for Parliament to be recalled and for a broadening of the inquiry to investigate the government's handling of intelligence on Iraq.
But the prime minister told Sky News' Sunday With Adam Boulton programme that a recall of Parliament would "generate more heat than light" and that Dr Kelly's family should be allowed time to grieve.
Mr Blair said he would take responsibility for the actions of officials such as his communications director Alastair Campbell: "In the end the government is my responsibility and I can assure you the judge will be able to get to what facts, what people, what papers he wants." He added: "At the present time this is far more something to do with the personal tragedy of Dr Kelly and I think that's actually what should be uppermost in our minds and has been in mine."
Asked if he had the appetite to go on as prime minister, Mr Blair replied: "Absolutely." Obsession Dr Kelly's family said he was a "loving, private and dignified" man and appealed for time to grieve.
His body was discovered in woodland near his Oxfordshire home on Friday morning, with a knife and a packet of painkillers close by.
Events over recent weeks made David's life intolerable and all of those involved should reflect long and hard on this fact
Kelly family statement Richard Butler, former chief UN weapons inspector, said it appeared the British, American and Australian governments had "pumped up" the threat in the run-up to war.
Mr Butler told BBC Radio 4's The World This Weekend that Dr Kelly, a friend and colleague, was a "good man... of probity and integrity".
"It follows logically from that, if he thought that things were being pumped up, he would have objected to it."
Dr Kelly is survived by his wife, Janice, and three daughters Sian, 32, and 30-year-old twins Rachel and Ellen.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk_politics/3081027.stm

Published: 2003/07/20 17:44:18 GMT

© BBC MMIII

##############################################

For liberty in our lifetimes.
by ANY means necessary.
Madd Maxx-

"And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been
like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an
arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say
goodbye to his family?  Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for
example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city,
people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling in terror at every
bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had
understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the
downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers,
or whatever else was at hand.  The Organs would very quickly have suffered a
shortage of officers and transport and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's
thirst; the cursed machine would have ground to a halt!"

The Gulag Archipelago,
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
 

Without Justice there is Just_Us!
 

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