Hold FBI accountable

 

Hold FBI accountable

     By by Gail Schoettler

     Sunday, June 24, 2001 - Timothy McVeigh has paid for his
     monstrous crime. While his execution can never atone for the
     suffering of the victims and their families society has held him
     accountable. Now, we Americans need to ask, will our premier
     law-enforcement agency, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, be
     held equally accountable for its irresponsible behavior in this case?

     We may not have much sympathy for Timothy McVeigh. But what
     if you or I, or one of our children, were accused of espionage, a
     crime bearing the death penalty? What if the FBI withheld files
     that would prove our innocence? Maybe they wouldn't be so lucky
     as to find them just before the penalty was carried out, but only
     after an innocent person had died.

     It's not just an individual who is now on trial; it is our system of
     justice. It is our top law-enforcement agency, the FBI. That the
     FBI could behave in such a callous manner when someone's life
     was at stake ought to frighten all of us. Because if the FBI could
     withhold evidence in Timothy McVeigh's trial, they could do the
     same to any one of us, anywhere, anytime, for any reason
     whatsoever.

     We Americans have every right to expect that our
     law-enforcement agencies will themselves obey the law. And, in
     most cases, they are highly professional, courteous, courageous
     and fair. In this case, however, the FBI, for whatever reason -
     indifference, incompetence, arrogance - simply didn't obey the law
     that it is sworn to uphold. The FBI is not alone. Remember how
     the Los Angeles police recently framed innocent people in a
     number of drug cases.

     It's not that these accused people are upstanding citizens. Most
     of them have been in trouble with the law before. But in our
     country, you can only be convicted of a crime you committed, not
     one that the cops wish you had committed. There must be proof
     beyond a reasonable doubt. Framing someone is not only blatantly
     illegal but is a threat to our system of justice. It is a threat to the
     rights, freedom and safety of every one of us.

     In the O.J. Simpson trial, as Alan Dershowitz pointed out, a pair of
     bloody socks presented as evidence clearly had been tampered
     with. In addition, the defense successfully attacked the credibility
     of a key detective in the case. Even jurors who believed Simpson
     was guilty had trouble voting to convict a man when they believed
     the police themselves had violated his rights in defiance of the
     law.

     Years ago, the Miranda decision required police to advise us of our
     rights when we are arrested. A whole network of laws limit police
     power, from illegal searches to abuse of prisoners. Our system of
     justice is based on the theory of innocence until you are proven
     guilty, on the right to a speedy and fair trial and the right to be
     judged by one's peers. It works well if everyone, including
     law-enforcement agencies, obeys those laws.

     We criticize China and other countries for not respecting human
     rights. In China, as in many countries, once arrested you could
     reasonably expect the police to manufacture evidence, to torture
     you into a confession or to withhold documents that would prove
     your innocence. Fortunately, we are not China. Fortunately, we
     have a system of justice that is designed to protect the innocent.
     What we do not always have, it seems, is a law-enforcement
     structure that follows the laws it swears to uphold and defend.

     Our law-enforcement agencies must always respect the law and
     the Constitution. Whether it's free speech or protecting the rights
     of the innocent or ensuring the safety of someone in their
     custody, these are essential protections in a democracy. That the
     nation's top law-enforcement agency ruthlessly ignored its
     responsibility in the Oklahoma bombing trials should be an outrage
     to all of us. And it should frighten all of us.

     If they could do this in one case, they could do it to any of us.
     The FBI needs to be held accountable.

     Gail Schoettler (gailschoettler@email.msn.com) has been a U.S.
     ambassador, Colorado lieutenant governor and treasurer, and a
     school board member.
http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495&article=3383
========================================================================

The Waco case ought to reopen.
http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495&article=3368

President Bush and Senator Leahy, reopen Waco investigation
http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495&article=3377

WHO WACO? (CONNECTING THE DOTS)
Hillary Rodham Clinton to visit Waco
http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495&article=3371

[WHO WACO]
Justice Department investigation should target UT
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/WHOWACO.HTM

Hillary Directed Waco
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/hillary_waco.htm

There are NO Statutes of Limitations on the Crimes of Genocide!
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/genocide.htm

WAR CRIMES - CLINTON IS NEXT?
http://disc.server.com/discussion.cgi?id=149495&article=3380

Cato Blasts Danforth Waco Report
Tuesday, 10 April 2001 17:05 (ET)
http://www.vny.com/cf/News/upidetail.cfm?QID=175900

Report to the Deputy Attorney General on the Events at Waco, Texas
February 28 to April 19, 1993
[SNIP]
Another major role for FBI Headquarters' personnel included contacting
various U.S. military components regarding the transportation of agent
and support personnel, and obtaining data about the effective range of
assorted weapons. The FBI also sought technical information about
certain military vehicles. According to DD Clarke, there was concern
and uncertainty as to the types of weapons inside the compound,
particularly in view of the reported presence of .50 caliber rifles
capable of penetrating any tactical vehicle in the FBI's inventory.
As a result of these concerns, the FBI requested Bradley fighting
vehicles from the U.S. Army. Nine of these -- without barrels, pursuant
to an agreement between the FBI and the Army to avoid posse comitatus
prohibitions -- were ultimately provided.
[SNIP]
http://www.usdoj.gov/05publications/waco/wacothree.html

FBI Behavioral Scientists
Throughout the 51-day standoff, agents at the Behavioral Science Unit
and the National Center for the Analysis of Violent Crime provided advice
to the on-scene commanders and negotiators. The advice was both oral
and written, and included background information that the FBI has
developed on cults, included profiles of cult leaders and followers.
http://www.usdoj.gov/05publications/waco/wacofour.html

APFN - WHY WACO - PAGES AND LINKS:
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/WACOPG.HTM

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whether it be good, or whether it be evil" ------(Ecclesiastes 12:14)
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Oklahoma Bombing Coverup
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/okc_coverup.htm


Why Waco?
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/wacopg.htm

 

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