Thousands of carcasses burned as Britain battles foot-and-mouth crisis
Monday, 26-Feb-01 16:23:28

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207.254.7.11 writes:
Thousands of carcasses burned as Britain battles foot-and-mouth crisis


LONDON, Feb 26 (AFP) -
British farmers on Monday burned thousands of animals in a grim battle to stem the deepening crisis over foot-and-mouth disease and limit the impact of Europe's latest food scare.

Despite their desperate efforts, the outbreak grew worse as the disease was discovered at more sites, raising the total to 12.

The agriculture ministry on Monday confirmed five new cases at farms in northeast, west and southwest England.

On Sunday a farmers' union official warned the outbreak could turn into a "nightmare scenario".

On Monday, his fears seemed to be justified. Not only has the disease jumped species from pigs to cattle and sheep, but it has also spread across the country.

Meanwhile, foot-and-mouth found at a farm in Devon in the southwest owned by a sheep dealer who exports animals to Europe prompted fears that the disease might have already spread across the Channel.

Commuters on the M25 London ring road could see billowing clouds of smoke produced by two 100-metre (-yard) long piles of dead pigs and cattle burning on a farm at Little Warley, southeast England.

The outlines of blackened bones, piled high and silhouetted against the intense orange and yellow of the fires, formed a grisly sight.

The air was filled with the smell of charred carcasses, which included stock from the farm's neighbouring Cheale Meats abattoir -- where the first case of foot-and-mouth was confirmed last week.

A lane between the abattoir and farm, along which the bodies were transported on Sunday, was thick with the smell of disinfectant, sprayed behind each container lorry used to shift the dead animals.

Agriculture minister Nick Brown told parliament on Monday that the government is urgently tracing all exports of animals from suspect areas to EU states, adding that he would update the council of agriculture ministers on Tuesday.

Britain banned all exports of meat and livestock last Wednesday.

Chief veterinary officer Jim Scudamore said almost 7,000 animals had either been or were about to be slaughtered in a bid to stop the disease spreading, including 1,800 cattle, 1,600 pigs and 3,500 sheep.

"Farmers' hopes go up in flames" is how the Guardian newspaper summed up the latest developments, a sombre view shared by most of the national press on Monday.

Farms across the country have laid out bales of straw sprayed with disinfectant at their entrances in an attempt to fend off the disease.

The outbreak is seen as a potential threat to the famous Six Nations tournament, with the Irish rugby authorities warning they were monitoring the situation before a Wales-Ireland game on Saturday in Cardiff.

They fear Irish supporters could come away from the city's Millennium Stadium with the virus on their shoes.

Meanwhile, lessons have been suspended in a number of British schools located in agricultural areas where the disease has been found.

The army has cancelled manoeuvres in Scotland and north England involving soldiers parachuting into fields.

And the powerful Contryside Alliance lobby group postponed until early May a planned March 18 demonstration against a ban on hunting with hounds. Tens of thousands had been due to take part.

Several zoos have closed their doors to visitors while ramblers have been urged to stay out of the countryside.

The latest confirmed cases come as a blow to hopes that Britain's first foot-and-mouth outbreak in 20 years had been contained by prompt action ordered by the government.

Haunted by the country's BSE crisis in the 1990s, the authorities have moved swiftly, imposing a seven-day ban on all livestock movement last Friday.

Foot-and-mouth disease, which causes blistering on animals' mouth and legs, poses little danger to humans, but is highly contagious among pigs, cattle, sheep and goats.

EU agriculture ministers, meeting in Brussels to thrash out a solution to the lingering farming crisis over mad cow disease, were expected to give equal or greater attention to foot-and-mouth disease, a last-minute agenda addition.

An increasing number of countries are taking action to protect themsleves against the British foot-and-mouth outbreak.

Switzerland said on Monday it had banned all imports of British animals. Poland, Russia and Singapore had already imposed their own bans.

More than 3,000 animals, mainly sheep and deer, were slaughtered in the Netherlands over the weekend as a precautionary measure, though no foot and mouth cases were detected.

The German state of North Rhine-Westphalia announced it would destroy some 400 sheep, also as a precautionary measure, after confirming that some animals imported into the state had come from a British farm where the disease had been detected.

Belgium banned the movement of sheep and goats on Saturday, while French authorities have located some 47,000 recently imported British sheep and are monitoring them.

But French authorities said Monday that foot-and-mouth disease had not yet surfaced in the country.

Veterinary officials in Italy and Denmark said they too were on high alert, but had not yet uncovered any suspect animals recently imported from Britain.

Stockholm has banned imports of uncooked meat, milk products or other products from hoof animals by travellers returning to Sweden from Britain.

http://asia.dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/world/afp/article.html?s=asia/headlines/010227/world/afp/

Thousands_of_carcasses_burned_as_Britain_battles_foot-and-mouth_crisis.html  


Monday, February 26 11:47 PM SGT

Europe slaughters animals to prevent spread of foot-and-mouth disease

THE HAGUE, Feb 26, 2001 (AFP) -

The Netherlands and Germany were slaughtering thousands of animals Monday, racing to prevent the spread of foot-and-mouth disease which has dealt a fresh blow to British farming.

The outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease, the first in Britain in 20 years, is the latest crisis to hit European farmers after the mad cow scare and has further heightened consumer fears about food safety.

British farmers incinerated thousands of animals on Monday in a desperate attempt to halt the spread of the disease, but the number of sites in the country where infected animals were discovered rose to nine.

More than 3,000 animals, mainly sheep and deer, were slaughtered in the Netherlands over the weekend, and the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia announced it would destroy some 400 sheep as a precautionary measure.

EU agriculture ministers, meeting in Brussels to thrash out a solution to the lingering farming crisis over mad cow disease, were expected to give equal or greater attention to foot-and-mouth disease, a last-minute agenda addition.

Foot-and-mouth disease, which causes blistering on animals' mouths and legs, does not pose a significant danger to humans, but is highly contagious among pigs, cattle, sheep and goats.

It is not considered fatal to animals, but could spell financial ruin for farmers whose animals fall ill.

Authorities in Britain, haunted by the country's mad cow crisis in the 1990s, have moved swiftly in an effort to contain the foot-and-mouth outbreak, the first in the country in 20 years.

They banned all exports of British meat and livestock last Wednesday, and imposed a seven-day ban on all livestock movement two days later.

The European Commission, the EU's executive body, issued a simultaneous temporary ban on British meat exports to the other 14 EU member states.

But the ban is due to expire on Thursday, hopefully giving the bloc's veterinary committee enough time to develop risk assessments and appropriate recommendations.

Several other nations have adopted individual measures to combat the disease.

Germany's North Rhine-Westphalia ordered the destruction of nearly 400 sheep after confirming that some animals imported into the state had come from a farm where the disease had been detected.

Switzerland announced on Monday that it had banned all imports of British animals or meat after the first foot-and-mouth case was reported in Britain on February 20. Poland, Russia and Singapore had already imposed their own bans.

Belgium banned the movement of sheep and goats on Saturday, while French authorities were monitoring some 47,000 recently imported British sheep.

But French authorities said Monday that foot-and-mouth disease had not yet surfaced in the country.

Veterinary officials in Denmark said they too were on high alert, but had not yet uncovered any suspect animals recently imported from Britain.

British Agriculture Secretary Nick Brown was due to brief his EU colleagues at the agriculture ministers' meeting in Brussels on Monday, and then return to London to address the House of Commons later in the day.

http://asia.dailynews.yahoo.com/headlines/world/afp/article.html?s=asia/headlines/010226/world/afp/Europe

_slaughters_animals_to_prevent_spread_of_foot-and-mouth_disease.html

Wednesday, 28 February, 2001, 15:35 GMT
Foot-and-mouth outbreak in Hong Kong

Hong Kong

No plans to destroy infected animals in Homg Kong
More than 400 pigs have died after an outbreak

of foot-and-mouth disease in Hong Kong.

But unlike in Britain, where thousands of cattle, pigs and sheep are being slaughtered, the government in Hong Kong has said the outbreak does not warrant the slaughter of any animals.

Xinhua news agency quoted a government official as saying there was no need for public alarm.

A spokeswoman for the Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department said foot-

and-mouth disease was a common affliction among livestock in winter.

Mass buring of infected cattle in Britain
In Britain thousands of infected animals are being incinerated

Dr Leslie Sims said that the virus is easily killed by cooking and there was no risk to public health.

She said there were no known cases of human beings being infected with the virus and such transmission was "extremely unlikely".

The department urged farmers to properly dispose of dead animals including pigs at designated collection points.

But one local newspaper, Ming Pao, has reported that some pig farmers had been disposing of dead pigs in open areas near to rubbish collection points to cover up the outbreak.

In 1998, the Hong Kong authorities ordered the destruction of a million-and-a-half chickens after the discovery of a potentially deadly flu virus.

Three cases of foot-and-mouth disease have also been discovered in Taiwan, where in 1997 millions of pigs were destroyed to contain an epidemic.

Three pigs were discovered in a herd of 100 pigs awaiting slaughter at a market outside the capital Taipei, the Council of Agriculture said.

The three pigs were destroyed. http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/monitoring/media_reports/newsid_1194000/1194563.stm

 


Europe fights to contain foot-and-mouth, cases found in Turkey

BRUSSELS, March 2 (AFP) -

As most of Europe fought to keep foot-and-mouth disease within the borders of Britain, cases of the highly infectious animal illness were detected in villages in central Turkey late on Friday.

It was not immediately known if the cases in Turkey were connected to the outbreak that erupted last week in Britain, or how many animals were infected.

But Turkish agriculture officials, quoted by the Anatolia news agency, said a quarantine has been imposed on four villages in the Anatolian province of Konya.

The outbreak came as animals were being taken from Turkey's eastern regions -- where raising livestock is the main source of income -- to the urban west to be sacrificed during the Muslim feast of Eid al-Adha.

After the first case was confirmed in Northern Ireland on Thursday, the neighbouring Irish Republic found itself in the frontline of the battle to stave off the highly contagious "sub-type 0" Asian strain of the virus.

Dublin went on a war footing.

Prime Minister Bertie Ahern, calling the disease a "once-in-a-generation" threat to Ireland, dispatched more than 1,000 troops and police to border crossings from the north, and ports and airports, to guard against the disease spreading.

Russia slapped a blanket ban on all cattle and meat product imports from Britain, having already tightened control of meat imports from a number of other European counties through which British products may have transited.

In Vienna, the Austrian government advised its nationals not to travel to Britain "unless absolutely necessary," until the disease has been cleared up. Air travelers arriving from Britain were made to tread over disinfectant carpets at Vienna airport.

Norwegian deputies meanwhile demanded that NATO exercises involving British troops be cancelled as a precaution.

"It is completely irresponsible for 300 British soldiers to arrive in an agricultural region where there are many farms in close proximity," said a deputy for the western Norwegian region of Soer-Troendelag, quoted by the NTB news agency.

The British troops were set to be deployed on Monday for three weeks.

France began taking measures within its borders on Friday, banning its own livestock markets and fairs in case foot-and-mouth has already made its way into the country.

The French agricultural ministry said it would be illegal to group pigs, cows, sheep or goats in markets, exhibitions or holding pens from March 6.

As the weekend approached, the crisis also hit sports events, with the cancellation of matches across Britain, including Saturday's rugby union Six Nations contest between Wales and Ireland.

Most sports fixtures in Ireland were called off for the weekend to minimise the risk of spreading the disease, frequently carried on clothing, footwear and vehicles.

Portugal, whose northern city of Oporto is to host a league quarterfinal match with Liverpool early next week, warned some 5,000 British fans expected that their footwear would be disinfected on arrival.

The foot-and-mouth outbreak has become a particularly sensitive issue for Britain, where mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) originated in the 1990s.

The BSE crisis, still a major and growing headache for the European Union although under control in Britain, has wreaked havoc on EU beef farmers, decimating markets and sending prices plummeting.

But BSE and foot-and-mouth are, medically, far apart.

BSE can hit humans in the form of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease, a fatal, brain-wasting condition that has killed at least 85 people in Britain alone.

Foot-and-mouth is more a financial scourge than a health one. It spreads rapidly through herds of sheep, cattle, goats and pigs, but the animals lose weight, and hence meat, from its effects and are destroyed to protect production.

Humans are not harmed by the illness but serve as effective carriers.

A European Commission spokesman said that no decision had been made for the mass vaccination of EU herds against foot-and-mouth disease, as London on Friday said at least 36 sites in the United Kingdom have now been confirmed.

"This would only be the worst case scenario," he said, adding that "so far scientists and veterinarians say that at this stage it's not necessary. Vaccination would only be the very, very last step to take."

http://sg.news.yahoo.com/010302/1/izi3.html

Mad Cow Disease Rampant in Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska
by William Cooper
 
Veritas News Service -- Exclusive, April 5, 2001 -- The cover-up of Mad Cow Disease in the United States is beginning to self destruct. According to a State of Colorado Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife (DOW) letter, Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy, in Europe it is known as Mad Cow Disease, is rampant in the mule deer, whitetail deer, and elk population of Colorado, Wyoming, and Nebraska. The very same disease in humans is called Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease. It is always fatal in animals and humans reducing the brain to a spongy mass over the period of infection.
 
 According to our confidential souces Colorado State University has been experimenting with injecting animals, deer, pronghorn, and elk with the disease. I can't prove it but I believe that some of the animals may have escaped quarantine and contaminated the whole area over a long period of time.
 
 The university is located in Glacier View northwest of Ft. Collins. For the last couple years hunters have been required to cut off the heads of their deer, put a tag on them, and drop it in barrels that have been placed at intersections of highways around the mountains. DOW tests the animals promising to notify the hunters if the meat is infected. If the hunter doesn't hear from DOW in six weeks, they are to assume that the
meat is okay. Some families who ate the meat after six weeks were notified after 8 weeks that the meat was contaminated.
 
 When hujnters send their deer to a meat processor it is mixed with all the other carcasses. There is no way to monitor this as the deer bodies are brought in fresh. They cannot hold a deer carcass for over six weeks before processing! They don't have that kind of storage facilities and/or freezers.
 
To cover-up the true nature of the disease in Colorado it has been called CWD or Chronic Wasting Disease. The problem became so serious that the Division of Wildlife was forced to tell the truth calling for a public meeting on April 7, 2000 to ask for public help in reducing the deer population by 50% in an effort to reduce spread of the disease.
 
 Most of the state of Colorado is infected. The heaviest concentration of the disease has been found in Game Management Unit 9 north of Fort Collins between US highway 287 and I-25 up to the Wyoming state line. Units around
the Red Feathers area, Masonville, Glacier View, and Estes Park are also experiencing high levels of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy.

Click here for full size version of letter from State of Colorado
Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife (DOW) Letter Dated March 23,2000 and Meeting held
to discuss this problem April 7,2000.
http://www.williamcooper.com/images/DivisionofWildlife.jpg


Madcow Human Blood Mix
http://www.apfn.org/apfn/madcow.htm

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