ENRON-HERBERT "PUG" WINOKUR, JR-DYNCORP

February 23, 2002

Who Are the Terrorists?
DynCorp's Paul V. Lombardi in Federal Court

DynCorp Charged

with Terrorism

Lawsuit Unites U.S. Workers &

Ecuador Farmers vs. Fumigation

Part I of a Series

By Al Giordano

A class-action lawsuit filed in Washington, DC, on behalf of 10,000 farmers in Ecuador and the AFL-CIO allied International Labor Rights Fund has DynCorp CEO Paul V. Lombardi running scared and lashing back with intimidation tactics.

Lombardi's DynCorp, one of the top 20 federal contractors, has already sprayed toxic herbicides over 14 percent of the entire land mass of the nation of Colombia, purportedly to eliminate coca crops.

Although DynCorp's taxpayer-sponsored biological warfare has not made a dent in the cocaine trade, it has caused more than 1,100 documented cases of illness among citizens, destroyed untold acres of food crops, displaced tens of thousands of peasant farmers, and harmed the fragile Amazon ecosystem, all in the name of the "war on drugs."

DynCorp has also been exposed for contracting mercenary soldiers-of-fortune for the covert activities of the US-imposed "Plan Colombia."

But DynCorp may be about to get its comeuppance in federal court, where Justice Richard W. Roberts is presiding over a lawsuit brought by labor, environmental and indigenous groups against the aerial herbicide program. The text of the legal complaint is available online for all to read:

http://www.usfumigation.org/compliant.htm

The Narco News Bulletin has learned that DynCorp's top corporate director, Lombardi, attempted last October to intimidate the International Labor Rights Fund, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit.

According to documents obtained by Narco News, on October 25, 2001, Lombardi wrote to each of the board members of the AFL-CIO allied Rights Fund in an unsuccessful attempt to scare them off the lawsuit. In that letter (the full text appears below), Lombardi accused the group, without offering evidence, of fronting for illicit "drug cartels."

Lombardi also attempted, bombastically, to portray the Rights Fund as an enemy in the war on terrorism. He wrote:

"Considering the major international issues with which we are all dealing as a consequence of the events of September 11th, none of us need to be sidetracked with frivolous litigation the aim of which is to fulfill a political agenda."

And DynCorp's Lombardi attempted to cause the Rights Fund to drop the lawsuit, saying, "Clearly it is NOT in our mutual best interests to continue politically charged litigation."

But Bishop Jesse DeWitt, president of the International Human Rights Fund, responded in a November 5, 2001 letter to DynCorp's Lombardi, suggesting that it is DynCorp that engages in terrorist actions. Narco News has obtained that letter, too (full text below) . In it, Bishop DeWitt stated:

"We found your reference to September 11 particularly apt, but for a very different reason. Based on what appear to be uncontested facts, a group of at least 10,000 Ecuadoran subsistence farmers have been poisoned from aerial assault by your company. Imagine that scene for a moment - you are an Ecuadoran farmer, and suddenly, without notice or warning, a large helicopter approaches, and the frightening noise of the chopper blades invades the quiet. The helicopter comes closer, and sprays a toxic poison on you, your children, your livestock and your food crops. You see your children get sick, your crops die. Mr. Lombardi, we at the International Labor Rights Fund, and most civilized people, consider such an attack on innocent people terrorism. Your effort to hide behind September 11 is shameful, and breathtakingly cynical."

Bishop DeWitt put Lombardi on notice that he and other DynCorp officials may be added as defendants in the lawsuit, now having been officially informed of the harm done by their fumigation program:

"If there is any further spraying done that causes similar harm, we will amend the legal complaint and name you and other DynCorp decision-makers as defendants in your personal capacities, and will charge you with knowingly conducting aerial attacks on innocent people. Again, based on well-established principles of international law, that would be terrorism."

Thus, DynCorp's first line of defense against the lawsuit - Lombardi's attempt to intimidate the International Labor Rights Fund into backing off the case - backfired.

Part II of this series will report on the failure of DynCorp's second line of defense against the lawsuit: an Affidavit by U.S. State Department fixer Randall "Randy" Beers on behalf of DynCorp that attempted to dismiss the lawsuit claiming the need for "national security" secrecy regarding the facts of the fumigation campaign.

Beers, according to sources close to the lawsuit, has now been subpoenaed for a February 27th deposition, in which attorneys for the Ecuador farmers and U.S. labor and environmental organizations will interrogate Beers under oath.

As we write, Beers, the State Department and DynCorp are desperately maneuvering to try and prevent the deposition from happening.

In our next report, Narco News will bring you Mr. Beers' Affidavit and report on his role in subverting democracy and promoting terror in our América.

==========================================================

Text of October 25, 2001 letter

by DynCorp CEO Lombardi:

October 25, 2001

Mr. Terry Collingsworth
Executive Director
International Labor Rights Fund
733 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20005

Dear Mr. Collingsworth:

You may be unaware of the fact that on September 11, 2001, the International Labor Rights Fund, of which you are a director, officer or advisor, brought suit in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia as counsel to an alleged class of Ecuadorian citizens against DynCorp and certain of its subsidiaries. The complaint is for alleged wrongful death, crimes against humanity and infanticide in connection with the alleged spraying of narcotic plant growth in Colombia near the Colombian border with Ecuador. The Fund filed the complaint on behalf of at least 10,000 Ecuadorian citizens who allegedly live near the border.

A DynCorps subsidiary has provided operations and maintenance support to the United States Department of State since 1991 in connection with a joint US/Colombian program for the eradication of illegal drug crops. A non-classified, abridged version of our contract sith the DOS can be reviewed at the following Department of State web address: www.usembassy.state.gov/bogota/wwwfdync.pdf.

I am assuming that, as a responsible director, officer or advisor of the International Labor Rights Fund, you will make a reasonable inquiry into the basis for the allegations that appear in the complaint (a copy of which I am enclosing with this letter.) I would encourage you in particular to give careful consideration to the following:

-- All of the allegations in the complaint arise from the performance of the above-referenced Department of State contract. As the contract makes clear, the State Department, in consultation with the Colombian government, provides detailed specifications as to when, where and how eradication of illicit crops is to take place. Additionally, any herbicides used in the eradication effort are provided by the Department of State. Indeed, any claims made against DynCorp and its subsidiaries for actions relating to this contract are the equivalent of asserting such claims against the federal government.

-- Considerable technical information is available on the material that is used in spraying of Colombian narcotic plant crops. The State Department has advised us that all this information confirms that at the concentration used and with the methods used to apply it, the glyphosate-based spray mix is highly unlikely to harm human beings or animals who happen to be in the coca fields at the time the fields are sprayed.

-- Each spray operation in Colombia is directed by the State Department and the Colombian government.

-- All aerial spraying of coca in Colombia is conducted under extremely stringent controls that give us a very high degree of confidence that there is no drift into Ecuadorian territory.

The allegations of the complaint are unfounded and irresponsible. In fact, considering the worldwide support for the elimination of harmful drugs from our cities and schools, it has been suggested by those who are aware of the lawsuit that the most logical supporters of such an action would be the drug cartels themselves. Notably, consistent with the drug cartels' objectives, the complaint also seeks to permanently enjoin further spraying of coca and opium poppy.

We are hardly in a position to preclude the filing of such baseless litigation. But we can and will defend against it. My purpose in writing is to request your personal due diligence in satisfying yourself from a public responsibility point-of-view that the suit is well founded and that you personally endorse its goals. Considering the major international issues with which we are all dealing as a consequence of the events of September 11th, none of us need to be sidetracked with frivolous litigation the aim of which is to fulfill a political agenda.

Subject to the typical restrains that apply whenever litigation is pending, I would be happy to discuss this letter with you if you would care to contact me. Clearly it is NOT in our mutual best interests to continue politically charged litigation with no substantive foundation.

Very truly yours,

Paul V. Lombardi

Cc: Dennis Gallagher, Esq.
Office of Legal Advisor
U.S. Department of State

 

Text of Bishop DeWitt's

response to Dyncorp:

November 5, 2001

To: Paul V. Lombardi
President and CEO
Dyncorp
11710 Plaza America
Reston, VA 20190-6010
Fax: 1-703-261-5080

Re: DynCorp Human Rights Violations

Dear Mr. Lombardi,

This responds to your letter of October 25, 2001. First, please be assured that the International Labor Rights Fund's decision to file a lawsuit against DynCorp for human rights violations in Ecuador was well-considered, and the Board of Directors has complete confidence in the legal judgment of Terry Collingsworth, our Executive Director and General Counsel. While all of us appreciate receiving a hard copy of the legal complaint from you, if you wish alert others to the complaint, please note that it is available on our Website, www.laborrights.org

We found your reference to September 11 particularly apt, but for a very different reason. Based on what appear to be uncontested facts, a group of at least 10,000 Ecuadoran subsistence farmers have been poisoned from aerial assault by your company. Imagine that scene for a moment - you are an Ecuadoran farmer, and suddenly, without notice or warning, a large helicopter approaches, and the frightening noise of the chopper blades invades the quiet. The helicopter comes closer, and sprays a toxic poison on you, your children, your livestock and your food crops. You see your children get sick, your crops die. Mr. Lombardi, we at the International Labor Rights Fund, and most civilized people, consider such an attack on innocent people terrorism. Your effort to hide behind September 11 is shameful, and breathtakingly cynical.

I must also formally protest your distorted representation of the facts. There is, as you well know, a growing consensus that there are serious health effects from the fumigation spray DynCorp is using. Further, there are numerous reputable organizations, such as the Institute for Policy Studies, the World Wildlife Fund, Greenpeace, the Latin American Working Group, and Earthjustice, that oppose further spraying until adequate testing is conducted. See, for example, www.fumigation.org. Likewise, a number of U.S. Senators and Representatives, people not normally viewed as the wild radicals you seem to think we are, are working to stop all further spraying until proper, independent testing is done to identify the health effects of spraying poison herbicide on people.

Regarding the factual basis for the Complaint, attached please find an October 12 letter sent by Terry Collingsworth to your lawyers at Spriggs and Hollingsworth. Mr. Collingsworth provided a copy of a declaration from Dr. Adolfo Maldonado (also attached), a medical expert who is probably the only qualified person to have examined actual victims of your aerial spraying in Ecuador. Dr. Maldonado confirms with medical and legal certainty that the people he examined were injured by the fumigant your company sprayed on them. You might review his declaration carefully before making further assertions that the case is baseless or frivolous. Dr. Maldonado's findings are confirmed by Judge Gilberto Reyes' recent ruling in Colombia enjoining further spraying based on evidence of health and environmental impacts in Colombia.

We also have credible evidence that DynCorp pilots have admitted that the spraying mechanism in the helicopters also jams up, causing the fumigant to be sprayed on non-target areas. In addition, we have evidence that the spray mechanism is directed by a computer program that is designed in your U.S. offices, and is utilized without regard to the specific wind speed or direction on the day of spraying.

Please note that in the October 12 letter, Mr. Collingsworth did attempt to facilitate discussion and stated in the last paragraph, "(a)ssuming that your client is not indifferent to whether the spraying is causing serious health problems for our clients, we would be interested in having a discussion about how to solve the problem before the litigation escalates into a costly and very public dispute." The October 18 response of your lawyers is attached. Apparently, they are not interested in discussing resolution of the case, at least just yet.

Mr. Lombardi, since you offered to discuss the situation, let's begin with the key question of allowing access to the spraying process. You place great weight on the assurances from the Department of State as to the safety of the fumigant you are spraying, but, again, as you well know, the Department of State has been less than forthcoming in releasing information about the actual mixture of chemicals being sprayed, and continues to refuse access to these chemicals for testing. A Freedom of Information Act request to the Department of State initiated by Earthjustice, on behalf of the Amazon Alliance, was refused, and is now the subject of litigation. Surely, if the program is as safe as you assert, there is no reason to refuse to provide available information and not to allow independent investigators to conduct tests.

You must concede that, at a minimum, there are some genuine issues of concern regarding the harmful effects of your fumigation program. Absent your intervention to address these concerns, we look forward to letting a Washington D.C. jury decide whether DynCorp should be liable for the health effects of spraying in Ecuador, where there was no contractual or political authorization to fumigate. Please note that Mr. Collingsworth has advised me that, in light of the clarity and certainty of Dr. Maldonado's finding that your spraying is causing great harm to people, you now have formal, actual notice of that harm. If there is any further spraying done that causes similar harm, he will amend the legal complaint and name you and other DynCorp decision-makers as defendants in your personal capacities, and will charge you with knowingly conducting aerial attacks on innocent people. Again, based on well-established principles of international law, that would be terrorism.

Sincerely,

Bishop Jesse DeWitt
President of the Board of Directors
International Labor Rights Fund

 

Background Information

Articles by Daniele Knight of the Inter Press Service (IPS):

ECUADORIANS FILE U.S. SUIT

OVER PLAN COLOMBIA

By Danielle Knight

WASHINGTON, Sep. 21 (IPS) -- Ecuadorian Indians are taking legal action in federal court here, charging that a U.S. company that was contracted to carry out fumigation of illicit crops in neighboring Colombia recklessly sprayed their homes and farms, causing illnesses and deaths, and destroying crops. U.S.-based attorneys representing 10,000 individuals living in the Amazon rainforest near the border with Colombia filed a class action complaint against Virginia-based DynCorp Corporation in federal court here Sep. 11.

A DynCorp spokesperson said the company has not been notified about the complaint and declined to comment further.

The legal complaint is the latest in a series of actions brought under the Alien Tort Claims Act, which allows foreign citizens to sue U.S. companies in courts here over acts committed abroad. "The spraying of a toxic herbicide over people and land is a stupid and reckless action," said Terry Collingsworth of the International Labor Rights Fund here, one of the lead counsels in the case.

In addition to charging DynCorp with violating the Alien Tort Claims Act, the complaint alleges the company also breached the U.S. Torture Victim Protection Act, among others. It seeks millions of dollars in compensation and an immediate halt to spraying that allegedly affects Ecuador. The complaint also calls into question Plan Colombia, the U.S.-funded strategy to combat narcotics launched last year by Colombian President Andres Pastrana. Plan Colombia involves $7.5 billion for social and economic development and $1.3 billion, pledged by the United States, mostly for military equipment and training, and aerial fumigation of illicit coca, marijuana, and poppy crops.

Colombian politicians and officials have said that although they favor eradicating narcotics crops, a new strategy is needed because fumigation with the herbicide glyphosate is causing illness, destroying pastures and food crops, poisoning livestock, and displacing thousands of small farmers. In March and July, Colombian legislators and governors came here and told reporters that fumigation was not hurting the narcotics industry but severely harming poor farming families. They said planes spraying the crops blanket entire communities with the herbicide and cause poor farmers to suffer illnesses and skin problems.

Indigenous leaders in Colombia also have voiced opposition to the spraying. Last year, Emperatriz Cahuache, president of the Organization of Indigenous Peoples of the Colombian Amazon, came to Washington and showed reporters a map illustrating how the areas of coca and marijuana cultivation overlaps with indigenous territories and the areas that have been fumigated. "These fumigations are contaminating the Amazon and destroying the forest," said Cahuache.

Proponents of Plan Colombia said glyphosate, marketed by the U.S.-based Monsanto company under the trade name Roundup, is as safe as salt. Critics countered that directions on glyphosate labels warn users not to allow the product to come into contact with people or water sources.

The lawsuit against DynCorp is the second time that indigenous communities in the Ecuadorian Amazon have used the Alien Tort Claims Act to sue a U.S. company in U.S. court for allegedly endangering human health and destroying crops. In 1993, a group of Ecuadorian indigenous people filed a class action suit against the Texaco oil company, charging that during two decades of drilling in the Amazon, it dumped more than 3,000 gallons of crude oil into the rainforest. The plaintiffs claimed that the company ignored oil industry standards and, instead of re-injecting the waste back into the ground, dumped a toxic cocktail of chemicals into unlined pits that eventually leached into streams and rivers. Their lawsuit is still pending in federal court in New York.

Cristobal Bonifaz, a Massachusetts-based attorney originally from Ecuador, is one of the lead attorneys in the case against Texaco. He is also a lead counsel representing Ecuadorians in the new action against DynCorp. Bonifaz said he became aware of the alleged fumigation in Ecuador after communication with his clients in the lawsuit against the oil company. "In the same region where Texaco devastated the environment and caused untold suffering to the people of the rainforest, a new enemy now comes from the air, poisoning the people, killing their crops, and destroying their land," said Bonifaz.

 

From the Inter Press Service

January 16, 2002

GROUPS SEEK U.N. PROBE

OF COLOMBIAN FUMIGATION

By Danielle Knight

WASHINGTON, Jan. 16 (IPS) -- Environmentalists and indigenous organizations in the Amazon river basin have asked the U.N. human rights commission to urge the United States and Colombia to stop fumigating illicit crops in the Latin American country. The aerial fumigation is part of the Plan Colombia anti-narcotics strategy partly funded by Washington and launched in 2000 by Colombian President Andres Pastrana. The effort includes $7.5 billion for social and economic development. The United States has pledged $1.3 billion, mostly for military equipment and training, and aerial fumigation of illicit coca, marijuana, and poppy crops.

Earthjustice, a U.S.-based law firm, wrote the request to the Geneva-based U.N. commission on behalf of Amazon Alliance, a network of indigenous communities and environmental organizations. According to the document, a mixture of herbicides sprayed from the air "drifts" over vast expanses of the countryside in Colombia and neighboring Ecuador. Thus, the petition states, deprives poor farmers and indigenous communities of their rights to a clean and healthy environment, health, life, sustenance, and property.

"The spray mixture and the manner in which it is applied have resulted in numerous health problems for residents, destruction of their food resources, contamination of their surface water, damage to surrounding wilderness areas, and tremendous deforestation," it says. The U.S. and Colombian governments have said the herbicide used in the fumigation -- glyphosate, which is marketed by the U.S.-based Monsanto company under the trade name Roundup -- is as safe as salt.

Critics have countered that directions on glyphosate labels warn users not to expose humans and water sources to the product. Even more toxic than the herbicide itself are two additives, known as surfactants, that are added to enhance its effect on plants, according to the complaint. Scott Pasternack, an associate attorney with Earthjustice's international program, said both governments have attempted to conceal this information by only asserting that glyphosate is harmless.

"The State Department has concealed information about the true toxicity of the spray mixture and has failed to conduct proper environmental and assessments," said Pasternack. State Department officials could not be reached for comment.

The complaint says that although Monsanto has recommended that aerial application not occur more than about three meters above the top of the largest plants, Colombian anti-narcotics police fly aircraft 10-15 meters above the tops of vegetation. "This difference in altitude would be expected to greatly increase drift of the mixture to non-target areas and communities such as those in Ecuador," it says.

The document is the latest in a series of efforts by environmentalists and indigenous organizations to stop the aerial spraying. In September 2001, U.S.-based attorneys filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of 10,000 Ecuadorean Indians who charged DynCorp, a U.S.-based company, of recklessly spraying their homes and farms, causing illness and deaths and destroying food crops. That suit was brought under the Alien Tort Claims Act, which allows foreign citizens to sue U.S. companies in courts here over acts committed abroad.

"The spraying of a toxic herbicide over people and land is a stupid and reckless action," said Terry Collingsworth of the International Labor Rights Fund here, one of the lead counsels in the case. Last year, Colombian legislators and governors came to Washington to plead their case against fumigation. They told reporters that fumigation was not hurting the narcotics industry but was severely harming poor farming families.

Between August 2000 and May 2001, Colombia's Public Ombudsman received 1,158 reports of damage to human health, the environment, and food crops allegedly caused by fumigation, they said. Planes spraying the crops, they added, blanket entire communities with the herbicide, causing sickness and skin problems. Indigenous leaders in Colombia also have voiced opposition to the spraying.

Last year, Emperatriz Cahuache, president of the Organization of Indigenous Peoples of the Colombian Amazon, came to Washington and showed reporters a map illustrating how indigenous territories overlap with and are affected by areas under coca and marijuana cultivation and targeted for fumigation. "These fumigations are contaminating the Amazon and destroying the forest," said Cahuache. In response, several U.S. legislators have called for investigations into the impact of the spraying.

In July 2001, Representative Steve Rothman, a Democrat, successfully added language to an appropriations bill that required the State Department to report to Congress on the health and environmental impacts of fumigation in Colombia. The language also directed the State Department to establish guidelines and verification methods to ensure that future aerial fumigation efforts do not harm the health of Colombians, their water supply, or legal crops.

Two years ago, U.S. lawmakers on a diplomatic visit to Colombia gained first hand knowledge of the potential impacts of fumigation. In December 2000, Democratic Senator Paul Wellstone and several members of his staff were hit with a fine mist of glyphosate from a helicopter demonstrating aerial fumigation. Police officials said it was an accident, blaming the wind for blowing the glyphosate from its intended path. Wellstone winced and rubbed his eyes later, but managed a joke, saying he could become a case study on possible dangers linked to the chemical.

 

Text of February 16, 2002 article
From the daily El Comercio, Quito, Ecuador
Translated by The Narco News Bulletin

Lawsuit in U.S. vs. Fumigation

on Ecuador Border

The lawsuit was filed by Quichuas and farmers from the state of Sucumbíos. The case proceeds in the Court of the District of Columbia, Washington, DC. The judge ruled on January 7th. Justice Richard W. Roberts accepted the complaint presented by the indigenous and farmers of Sucumbíos, inhabitants of Northeast Ecuador, on the border of Colombia.

In his order, Judge Roberts opined that the investigation of Dyncorp, sued by the plaintiffs, will proceed. Dyncorp was contracted by the U.S. Department of State to fumigate coca crops in Colombia.

According to the complaint, Dyncorp has committed crimes against humanity, torture and cultural genocide. This lawsuit is based on an investigation that Acción Ecológica published in June 2001.

The report indicated that herbicide spraying in Colombia, near the Ecuador border, with the herbicide called Round Up Ultra, caused "harm to the health and the crops of 100 percent of the population within five kilometers of the border with Colombia."

In July 2001, the U.S. Embassy in Quito denied that the fumigations in Colombia use Round Up Ultra.

According to the Court's order, the "use by DynCorp of the toxic herbicide in a prolongued and repetitive form has caused continuous and severe harm to the plaintiffs, which constitutes Crimes Against Humanity."

The Quichua indigenous and farmers of Sucumbíos filed their lawsuit on September 11, 2001, as a class action suit. They seek civil damages for harm caused by the fumigations to the inhabitants of Ecuador communities near the Colombian border.

DynCorp, which has a $600 million dollar contract to fumigate, asked the judge to dismiss the case because it involves national security interests of the United States.

For Lucía Gallardo of Acción Ecológica, "the acceptance of this complaint is a success."

See also: http://www.usfumigation.org/Lawsuits/Ecuador.htm

         http://www.narconews.com/dyncorpterrorism1.html

I. PUG WINOKUR'S BACKGROUND. Click.
II. MORE ON THE PLAYERS IN PUG'S BACKGROUND. Click.

A. PACIFIC HOLDING. Click.
B. PENN CENTRAL. Click.
C. VICTOR PALMERI & CO. Click.
D. ICF, INC. Click.
E. CAPRICORN HOLDINGS. Click.
F. DYNCORP. Click.
G. ENRON. Click.
H. COUNCIL FOR FOREIGN RELATIONS. Click.
I.  BACKGROUND RELATED TO ROBERT STONE AND KIRBY CORPORATION. Click.
J. NATCO GROUP. Click.
K. CCC INFORMATION SYSTEMS. Click.

III. ADDITIONAL AREAS WORTH RESEARCHING. Click. 

A. DynCorp's role in the Gulf War. Click.
B. DynCorp's role in the Kosovo war. Click.
C. Note re; Ron Brown's fatal plane crash. Click.
D. DynCorp's role in Columbia. Click.
E. DynCorp's role in DOJ asset forfeiture. Click.
F. DynCorp's role in GETS: Government Emergency Telecommunications System (GETS). Click.
G. DynCorp's POP. Click.
H. DynCorp & Capricorn Holdings. Click.
I.   DynCorp & Oklahoma City. Click.
J.  Political Relationships. Click.

K. Documentation: Herbert S. Winokur and Oscar Wyatt $100,000
Donations and Enron $25,000 to 1993 Presidential Inaugural Foundation Click.

WINOKUR AND DYNCORP

As Federal investigations swirl around Winokur and
other board members, doubt has been raised about
the viability of independent investigation, given
Enron's enormous political clout, Winokur's leading
role in the company that manages information systems
for many of the investigative agencies raises a
special set of concerns.

Winokur owes much of his wealth to his role in
reconstructing Dyncorp, one of the Federal government's
largest private contractors. He is a former Dyncorp
chairman and remains a director of the company. At
present, Dyncorp manages e-mail and information
systems for the Department of Justice, the Securities
and Exchange Commission and the Federal Bureau of
Investigations.

Investigators are reportedly concerned that Dyncorp's
control of agency information systems could compromise
their investigations of Winokur and Enron.

more.... Harvard Watch Org.
See Full Report http://www.harvardwatch.org  

=========================================

One such corporation, heavily involved in both Colombia and in Kosovo is
the Virginia based DynCorp. DynCorp, according to Alex Cockburn and Jeff St
Clair, is the nation's tweet-second largest defense contractor with 1998
Government contract revenues of $475 million. DynCorp, which currently has
between 300-600 contracted employees in Colombia, is performing functions
like crop eradication (using defoliants - like Vietnam), to sophisticated
aerial reconnaissance, to combat advisory roles training military and
possible even paramilitary forces. When the history of the Colombian War is
written it may well be noted that the first U.S. casualties were actually
three Dyn Corp employees killed when their reconnaissance aircraft crashed
on a mountain top in the drug growing regions last summer. DynCorp
employees have been described as being arrogant and more than willing to
get "wet" by going out on combat missions and engaging in firefights. A
British source reminded us recently that DynCorp Chairman, Pug Winokur,
begged out of Commerce Secretary Ron Brown's ill fated last flight in the
Balkans. The same Pug Winokur is on the board of Harvard Endowments which
had a behind the scenes hand in destroying the economic research conducted
by former Assistant Secretary of Housing, Catherine Austin Fitts in 1996.
That research was beginning to illuminate how the drug trade generates
profits for Wall Street through the subsidized HUD housing market where
Harvard is a heavy investor.
http://www.mail-archive.com/natnews@egroups.com/msg01280.html

==========================================================

AIMCO – The largest owner and manager of HUD subsidized property, having acquired many HUD managers and owners, including NHP and Insignia. At the time of its purchase of NHP, Harvard Endowment, Capricorn (headed by Pug Winokur) and Warburg, appear to have remained as equity investors in AIMCO through stock exchanges.
http://solari.com/media/who's%20who.html

Capricorn Investors – A private investment group based in Connecticut and led by Pug Winokur. It has significant investment in NHP, Inc (HUD Housing), AIMCO (HUD Housing), WMF (HUD multifamily mortgage banking), and DynCorp (DOJ and HUD asset forfeiture and litigation, PROMIS and information systems support, and War on Drugs support in Latin America).
http://solari.com/media/who's%20who.html

Dyncorp – Lead contractor to the DOJ Asset Forfeiture Fund, lead contractor for the Justice Office Consolidated Network supporting the DOJ Civil Division, and lead contractor for HUD OIG information systems, and support to Lockheed for HUD computer and information systems. Capricorn (Pug Winokur) has been the largest outside investor to Dyncorp since 1989 with Pub Winokur serving as Chairman of the Board until 1997, when he reduced his investment position and became a member of the Board.*
http://solari.com/media/who's%20who.html

Enron Fallout
http://www.dyncorp-sucks.com/enron.htm

ENRON'S Herbert S. Winokur, Jr.
http://www.apfn.org/enron/winokur.htm

More on Herbert "Pug" Winokur, Jr.
http://www.apfn.org/enron/winokur2.htm
 


THE "HERBERT (PUG) S. WINOKUR DATA DUMP"
.
http://www.newsmakingnews.com/catharvardpugdd.htm

WHY THE HARVARD CORPORATION PROTECTS THE DRUG TRADE. Part 1
http://www.newsmakingnews.com/lmharvardpart1.htm

DYNCORP - ENRON - ROBERTS - BUSH - HARVARD CONNECTION
http://www.apfn.or/apfn/DYNCORP-letters.htm

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